Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Don Rush

The cold snap has left many on the islands that dot the Chesapeake Bay a bit stranded.

Tangier Island has been iced in with the low temperatures.

And, the Accomack County Board of Supervisors has sent a letter to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources complaining that the agency did not send an ice-breaking ship to the island.

Supervisor Wanda Thornton called this an emergency situation.

A spokesman for the state agency told the Salisbury Daily Times that DNR was ready to send supplies by boat if it is needed.

dnr photo

Maryland Department of Natural Resources Secretary Joe Gill’s reconfirmation could be in trouble.

It began following a hearing on a measure last week that would allow DNR to open, close or modify fisheries in a 48 hour period.

Maryland Watermen’s Association president Robert Brown said Gill came up to him and said that if the legislation did not pass he could curt quotas that would hurt him.

Gill says that his comments were misunderstood.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - The Maryland Department of Natural Resources says it is seeking volunteers to teach children about the Chesapeake Bay and other state waterways.

The volunteers will be part of the Teaching Environmental Awareness in Maryland program. More than 1,200 classroom presentations have been given since the program was started in 1998. Students are told about the bay's six-state watershed, oysters, oyster reefs, horseshoe crabs and Chesapeake watermen.

SNOW HILL, Md. (AP) — The Maryland Department of Natural Resources says it is seeking the public's input on proposed changes to hunting areas in the Chesapeake Forests on the lower Eastern Shore.

The department says it is accepting public comments until Aug. 11 on the changes proposed for the 2012-2013 hunting season. DNR owns the Chesapeake Forests, which cover nearly 67,000 acres in six lower Eastern Shore counties. The proposed changes affect more than 7,800 acres.

The Chesapeake Bay has seen a good year so far when it comes to – what are called – dead zones.

Because of the mild winter, a dry spring and a hot summer not much rain has been around…to move pollution from farms and city streets into water ways.

As a result the dead zones that usually show up this time of summer…are much smaller.

The nutrient pollution feeds algae blooms that eventually eat up the oxygen in the water.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Chesapeake Bay dead zones are down this June from last spring when heavy rains pushed them to levels not seen in decades.

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources says samples collected in early June show 12 percent of the bay's main stem had low oxygen levels, down from the same period last spring when a third had levels too low for life. The long-term average is 17 percent.

DNR says warmer, drier conditions this winter, compared to the extremely wet spring last year may be the difference.

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is clamping down on poaching in the Chesapeake Bay with radar and more cameras.

Later this year the maritime Law Enforcement Information Network is set to go online with 24/7 surveillance of areas in the Chesapeake Bay.

The Salisbury Daily Times reports that more than a year ago there were efforts to put GPS units on all boats.

But that was turned down by the US Supreme Court on a 5-to-4 vote ruling that it was a violation of the Constitution and would require a warrant or a judge’s consent.


ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland natural resources officials say Diamond Jim is on the loose.

The first specially tagged Diamond Jim was among dozens of striped bass released Thursday into the Chesapeake Bay as part of an annual fishing challenge. Anyone who catches the fish wins a prize that increases the longer the fish goes uncaught. Diamond Jim is worth $10,000 to the angler who catches it before midnight June 30. A new Diamond Jim is released each month and the prize increases to $20,000 in July, and $25,000 in August.


     ST. MICHAELS, Md. (AP) - The Maryland Department of Natural Resources says state and federal officials are planning a major oyster restoration effort for Harris Creek on the Eastern Shore.

     DNR officials along with their counterparts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plan to discuss the effort Wednesday at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels.