landfill

crerative commons

OCEAN CITY, Md. (AP) - Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is repealing a policy on waste management that he says took authority away from local officials and caused problems.

The Republican governor announced the repeal in a speech to local officials Tuesday night.

The policy put in place by his predecessor, Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley, limited new or expanded landfill capacity to encourage alternatives to storing waste in landfills.

But Hogan says the policy created unnecessary hardships and overflowing landfills. He says he's replacing it with a more balanced approach.

creative commons

The Wicomico County Council wants to know why a commercial hauler got a 50 percent price break at the county landfill resulting in a loss over $87-thousand.

Assistant Director of Administration Weston Young asked for a waiver on the uncollected tipping fees from the hauler and for a way so that it would not happen again.

The Salisbury Daily Times reports that the council did consider a price break for the construction and demolition waste but never took final action.

The paper reports that the regular price is $60 a ton while the reduced price was $30 a ton.

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Representative John Kowalko has launched a petition drive aimed at removing a half million tons of waste at an Edge Moor pigment plant.

The Newark Democrat said he is worried that the Chemours’ facility could pollute the surrounding area if the plant is sold or left abandoned after the company closes it.

That would leave the taxpayer to fund the cleanup of the 15 acre site if the waste leaked into the groundwater.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that a Chemours spokesperson said that there were no plans to sell the facility.

Don Rush

A $75 million price tag and questions about the technology has at least one Wicomico Council member oppose -- at least for the moment -- to  the construction of a gasification plant to ease the strain on the county’s landfill.

Council Vice President Bob Culver says the price tag for construction of the plant is one problem.

“As far as spending $75 million I would not be in favor of that right now. The other part of the gasification project would be that it’s new and not been tried in the United States.”

Under a deal negotiated with Honeywell International a Wilmington City Council panel moved to approve a $35 million plan for a landfill-gas-fueled plant that would generate power and dry sludge at the city’s regional wastewater plant.

The full council is expected to vote as early as Thursday on the plan for the 20-year construction and operation agreement with the company.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that Honeywell projected that the new operation would save Wilmington a total of $16.7 million by 2034.