dead zone

creative commons

GLOUCESTER POINT, Va. (AP) - Researchers say the total amount of oxygen-deprived dead zones in Chesapeake Bay this summer was the biggest since 2014.

The Virginia Institute of Marine Science also said Monday that the total amount of dead zones this summer increased by 10 percent over last year.

The institute has used a three-dimensional forecast model since 2014 to gauge areas of oxygen depletion - or hypoxia - in which oxygen dissolved in water falls so low it no longer supports fish, crabs, oysters and other aquatic organisms. Pollution has been blamed.

Chesapeake Bay Foundation

WASHINGTON (AP) - Scientists say this year's summer "dead zone" in the Chesapeake Bay will be larger than average.

"Dead zone" refers areas of low or no oxygen that can kill fish and aquatic life.

Scientists with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Geological Survey gave a forecast on the dead zone on Wednesday.

They say this year's dead zone could be about 1.89 cubic miles, or nearly the volume of 3.2 million Olympic-size swimming pools.

Chesapeake Bay 123rf.com

BALTIMORE (AP) - The size of the Chesapeake Bay's low oxygen "dead zone" is down and dry weather is getting the credit.

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources says testing last week found nearly 12 percent of the bay had poor oxygen levels, nearly half of the long-term average for this time of year. The dead zone dropped from about 30 percent of the bay in July, which typically is when the zone peaks each year.