Arts

Arts and culture

'Mariam Sharma' Nails The Fun Road-Trip Vibe

Jun 7, 2018

Summer is the season for road-trips, and Mariam Sharma Hits the Road makes for a saucy, yet emotional ride. It follows three Pakistani-American teens as they journey through the Deep South, looking for escape, answers, trouble, and above all, a fabulous adventure.

Peek into the walk-in refrigerators of the most lauded restaurants in the country, and you will likely find just one store-bought ingredient: Duke's Mayonnaise. But what most people don't know is that the company was founded by a Southern woman at a time when many women like her didn't run businesses.

In a 2000 essay for The New Republic, literary critic James Wood coined a term that's become familiar to lovers of fiction: "hysterical realism." Wood's target was Zadie Smith's "White Teeth," along with novels by Salman Rushdie, David Foster Wallace and others. "The big contemporary novel is a perpetual-motion machine that appears to have been embarrassed into velocity," he wrote.

If you tune into Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Thursday, it's unlikely you'll hear NBC hockey announcer Mike "Doc" Emrick use the word "pass" very often to describe action on the ice.

You may hear that a player "squirts" the puck — or possibly, he "ladles" it.

Steven Soderbergh's Oceans Eleven was released in December 2001. It arrived early in a long winter in which debates bubbled along over what people wanted from entertainment in the post-Sept. 11 environment. Would they seek out simple diversions? Or something uplifting?

Are you a Miranda or a Charlotte? NPR's All Things Considered wants to know what you think of Sex and the City 20 years after it premiered.

Your responses may be used in an upcoming story, on air or on NPR.org. A producer may reach out to you to follow up on your response, too.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

In the beginning, there is the woman who walks.

"I have somehow become a woman who yells," she says. "And because I do not want to be a woman who yells, whose little children walk around with frozen, watchful faces, I have taken to lacing on my running shoes after dinner and going out into the twilit streets for a walk."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Twenty years ago today, a TV show debuted that reverberated far beyond its setting in Manhattan.

(SOUNDBITE OF "SEX AND THE CITY" THEME)

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