Keep Your Head Above Water

Nov 26, 2011
Originally published on November 27, 2011 11:51 am

On-Air Challenge: Each answer is a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase containing the consecutive letters H-H-O, as in H2O. For example, given the clue "Dutch province containing Rotterdam and The Hague," the answer would be "South Holland."

Last Week's Challenge: Name a food item. Divide this word in half. Take the second half followed by the first half twice, and you'll get a familiar saying. If you take the second half twice, followed by the first half, you'll name a well-known person. What are the food item, saying and person's name?

Answer: The food item is mayo, the saying is "Yo, mama," and the person's name is Yo-Yo Ma.

Winner: Rob Dobrusin of Ann Arbor, Mich.

Next Week's Challenge from listener Dan Pitt of Palo Alto, Calif.: Think of a common five-letter word in one syllable. Change the fourth letter to the next letter of the alphabet, and you'll get a common word in two syllables, also in five letters. What words are these?

Submit Your Answer
If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. Time now for the puzzle.

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CORNISH: Let's start with last week's challenge from Will Shortz. He's, of course, the puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Name a food item. Divide this word in half. If you take the second half followed by the first half twice, you will get a familiar saying. And if you take the second half twice followed by the first half, you'll name a well-known person. What's the food item and what's the saying and name?

CORNISH: Well, more than 900 of you figured out the correct answers and our randomly-selected winner this week Rob Dobrusin from Ann Arbor, Michigan, who's on the line now. Congratulations, Rob.

ROB DOBRUSIN: Thank you very much.

CORNISH: So, what was the answer to last week's challenge?

DOBRUSIN: Well, the food was mayo and the answers were yo mama and Yo-Yo Ma.

CORNISH: Oh, OK. How did you figure that out?

DOBRUSIN: I actually worked it through from the end first. I tried to think of a person who had a name of that pattern of two syllables the same at the beginning, and Yo-Yo Ma jumped right into my mind.

CORNISH: Are there that many other names that have that kind of repetition?

DOBRUSIN: This was the first one that came to mind. In fact, I asked my daughter about it a few days later, and I said do you know anybody with a pattern of a name like this, and she said to me, like Yo-Yo Ma? So...

CORNISH: And what do you do in Ann Arbor, Michigan?

DOBRUSIN: I'm the rabbi of a synagogue out here in Ann Arbor.

CORNISH: Does that give you any advantages to solving puzzles?

DOBRUSIN: I don't know. I mean, working with words, you know, I do a lot of reading texts and things like that, but who knows?

CORNISH: Well, before we continue, let's welcome puzzle master Will Shortz. Good morning, Will.

SHORTZ: Hi, Audie.

CORNISH: Rob, do you have any questions for Will? This is your chance, if you've been playing for a long time.

DOBRUSIN: Well, the only question I have is how does he think of these puzzles? I look at the books and I see them and I say I can solve them pretty well, but I can't imagine putting them together, so, I wonder what that process is.

SHORTZ: Yeah, you never know when ideas will come to you. I sometimes read a newspaper, I'll hear something, I'll see a sign. Sometimes just lying at bed at night, something will swim in my brain.

CORNISH: All right. Seeing a sign - maybe that's helpful to you then, Rob, right? All right. Will, take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, Rob. Well, in today's puzzle, all the answers may be said to carry water. Each answer is a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase containing the consecutive letters H-H-O as in H2O. For example, if I said Dutch province containing Rotterdam and The Hague, you would say South Holland, 'cause South Holland has the consecutive letters H-H-O. All right?

DOBRUSIN: Yep.

SHORTZ: Number one is a period from noon to one o'clock for many workers.

DOBRUSIN: Lunch hour.

SHORTZ: Lunch hour is right. Number two: a familiar name for a bar at a golf club.

DOBRUSIN: Nineteenth hole.

SHORTZ: Excellent. Place to put a worm.

DOBRUSIN: Fish hook.

SHORTZ: Um-hum. Domicile along a sandy shore.

DOBRUSIN: Beach house.

SHORTZ: That's it. Low-priced lodging for vacationing kids.

DOBRUSIN: Low-priced housing for vacationing kids.

SHORTZ: Lodging. Say, you were a kid overseas and you wanted to stay...

DOBRUSIN: Oh, youth hostel.

SHORTZ: Youth hostel is it, good. If you're a hottie or a contemptuous, somebody might tell you to get off your...

DOBRUSIN: High horse.

SHORTZ: That's it. Former name for Belize.

DOBRUSIN: Well, it's Honduras. Is it British Honduras?

SHORTZ: British Honduras, good. Words before and charity in an old expression.

DOBRUSIN: Faith, hope.

SHORTZ: That's it. Something fed to livestock to make them get bigger artificially.

DOBRUSIN: Is it hay, is the last word hay?

SHORTZ: No. It's not really a food item. It's something I think you would inject in the livestock (unintelligible)...

DOBRUSIN: Oh, growth hormone.

SHORTZ: Growth hormone is it. Rosh Hashanah or Passover.

DOBRUSIN: A Jewish holiday.

SHORTZ: Thought you'd get that one. Uh-huh. How about elasticized stockings?

DOBRUSIN: Elasticized stockings. Hose, hosiery would be the second word?

SHORTZ: Yes, it is. And the...

DOBRUSIN: Stretch.

SHORTZ: Stretch hose is right. Translation of cum laude.

DOBRUSIN: With honor.

SHORTZ: That's it, with honors. And your last one: exclamation from the Seven Dwarfs as off to work they go.

DOBRUSIN: Heigh-ho.

SHORTZ: Heigh-ho is it. Nice job.

CORNISH: Wow, Rob.

DOBRUSIN: Thank you.

CORNISH: Great job. Give the people at home a chance, man. Well, Rob, for playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at NPR.org/Puzzle. And, Rob, which member station do you listen to?

DOBRUSIN: WUOM. We're members of Michigan Public Radio.

CORNISH: Rob Dobrusin, thanks so much for playing the puzzle this week.

DOBRUSIN: It's been a lot of fun.

CORNISH: So Will, what's our challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes, it comes from listener Dan Pitt of Palo Alto, California. Think of a common five-letter word in one syllable. Change the fourth letter to the next letter of the alphabet, and you'll get a common word in two syllables, also in five letters. What words are these? So again, a common five-letter word, one syllable. Change the fourth letter to the next letter of the alphabet, and you'll get a common word in two syllables. What words are these?

CORNISH: Of course, when you have the answer go to our website, NPR.org/puzzle, and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Just one entry per person, please. And our deadline for entries is Thursday, December 1st at 3 P.M. Eastern Time. So, include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner we'll give you a call and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's Puzzlemaster, Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Audie. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.