Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

A state board in California has approved a proposal to require solar panels on all new homes beginning in 2020, a measure that would increase the cost of new construction but provide savings on utilities — and help the state meet ambitious targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

California, which is routinely a leader in environmental regulatory efforts, would be the first state in the country with such a requirement. Several cities, including San Francisco and South Miami, Fla., have residential solar panel requirements.

An NBC Universal investigation into multiple accusations of sexual misconduct by former Today host Matt Lauer found that the allegations were credible, but that the conduct in question was never specifically reported to human resources or to senior NBC News executives.

Updated at 12:50 a.m. ET on Tuesday

A volcanic eruption on Hawaii's Big Island continues to spew lava and toxic gases into a residential neighborhood, days after the shift in volcanic activity first prompted evacuations.

Some 35 structures — including at least 26 homes — have been destroyed and there are now 10 active fissures, according to the Hawaii County Civil Defense agency. More than 1,700 people have been ordered to evacuate their homes.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

Retired Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North, infamous for his involvement in the Iran-Contra scandal in the 1980s, will be the next president of the National Rifle Association, the organization says in a statement.

On Sunday night, the Tampa Bay Lightning defeated the Boston Bruins to head to the NHL's Eastern Conference Finals.

And nobody licked anybody.

That was not a guarantee. Bruins left wing Brad Marchand licked opposing players twice this postseason.

Update at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, May 10:

A New Orleans energy company now acknowledges that it provided funds that were used to pay "supporters" at public meetings about a proposed power plant, but says the company didn't know the funds were being used for that purpose.

NASA's InSight lander is on its way to Mars, after a successful launch on Saturday morning.

The lander was launched by an Atlas V rocket taking off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California shortly after 4 a.m. local time. It successfully separated from the upper stage more than an hour later.

The lander is in contact with mission control as it heads off on its six-month trip to the Red Planet.

A "computer algorithm failure" in the U.K. kept hundreds of thousands of women from getting notified it was time for a mammogram, potentially shortening the lives of up to 270 women, the National Health Service says.

The U.K. sends letters to women who are due for breast screening, according to British national guidelines, which call for exams every 3 years for women age 50-70. Because of the computer glitch, an estimated 450,000 women in England around the age of 70 did not receive their mammogram invitation.

The Basque militant group ETA, which killed hundreds of people over a bloody, decades-long campaign for independence, has ceased to exist, the organization announced Wednesday in an open letter.

After nearly 60 years, ETA's "journey has ended," the letter states. Aiming to "end a cycle of conflict," the group said it has dismantled its structures, stopped its initiatives and will no longer engage in political activity.

Updated at 11:25 p.m. ET

An Air National Guard cargo plane crashed near Savannah, Ga., on Wednesday morning. At least nine people were killed, according to the local sheriff's office.

The cargo plane, which is attached to the Puerto Rico Air National Guard's 156th Airlift Wing, went down shortly after taking off from the airport in Savannah in the course of a routine mission to Arizona.

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