winter storm

Don Rush

As this week’s snow draws near a coastal flood advisory is in effect for the Delaware coastline into tomorrow morning.

The National Weather Service says the alert bean at 5 a.m. this morning through 4 a.m. tomorrow morning.

The storm surge is expected to be as high as 2 and a half feet.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that as the winter storm advances tomorrow the ocean waves are expected to reach 8 to 10 feet.

The bay could see a height of up to 5 feet.

Governor's Office

REISTERSTOWN, Md. (AP) - Maryland officials say they intend to pursue federal disaster assistance after this weekend's snowstorm.

Russell Strickland, the director of the Maryland Emergency Management Agency, announced Monday he has sent the letter of intent to seek assistance to federal officials.

Gov. Larry Hogan says he has directed the agency to work with the federal government and seek all available assistance to support recovery efforts.

Weather Channel

With the oncoming snow storm Maryland and Virginia have declared a state of emergency as Delaware Governor Jack Markell urges residents to prepare for the winter blast.

Delaware is expected to be hit the hardest on Delmarva with up to 8 inches in Sussex County while in Salisbury the snow is expected to be 2 to 4 inches deep.


The National Weather Service has declared a blizzard watch for New Castle and Kent counties, while Sussex County is under a winter storm watch.

Snow, Once Again

Mar 18, 2014
Don Rush

Delmarvans were once again digging themselves out of the snow yesterday and braving the slushy roads.

Monday brought 5 to 7 inches of snow in the Salisbury area bringing this season’s total to 18.5 inches.

In Sussex County as much 9 inches blanketed the region.

The Salisbury Daily Times reports that none of this comes close to the 2009-2020 season that saw 40 inches of snow.            

Is it over?

The region has seen as much as 10 inches of snow in April but that was in 1915.

Creative Commons

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) - Delaware transportation officials say fixing the bumpy roads left behind after this particularly rough winter may be a budget buster.

The Department of Transportation budgeted nearly $6.3 million for road patching this fiscal year, but it only has about $2.2 million left. Officials expect the Pavement Management Section will have to make up the difference by shifting funds from scheduled spring paving work.