Warren Deschenaux

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - A leading budget analyst for Maryland's legislature is telling lawmakers they need to do more to address future state spending, especially due to uncertainties about how federal spending decisions could affect the state.

Warren Deschenaux said Gov. Larry Hogan's budget plan makes hard decisions to balance the books for the next fiscal year. But he says the Republican governor's plan to address mandated spending in future years is "relatively weak tea."

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland's leading budget analyst says state lawmakers and policy makers need to "get real" about addressing ongoing budget shortfalls.

Warren Deschenaux, the legislature's chief budget analyst, told a panel of lawmakers on Tuesday that the state appears to be in a period of comparatively slow economic growth. He says the state needs to trim its sails in order to accommodate that.

Don Rush

Governor Larry Hogan’s proposal for a 2 percent across the board cut for state agencies without any mention as to what should be slashed is being criticized by a top Maryland budget analyst.

Warren Deschenaux, director of the Office of Policy Analysis for the Department of Legislative Services, told a panel of lawmakers that he believes the lawmakers should know details.

He called the new governor’s approach “very dangerous.”

Don Rush

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland lawmakers will be facing a shortfall of about $593 million under current projections when they work on the budget for the next fiscal year.

Warren Deschenaux, the Legislature's chief budget analyst, gave a briefing to the state's Spending Affordability Committee on Wednesday.

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - A top Maryland budget analyst is encouraging lawmakers to create a greater budget cushion than one included in Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget plan.

Warren Deschenaux said Monday lawmakers should aim to create a fund balance of about $100 million for the next fiscal year. He says the budget submitted by O'Malley last week has about a $30-million cushion.

That's above the state's Rainy Day Fund of about $800 million, but lawmakers and analysts always aim to have that money safely set aside without needing to be tapped.