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On a pristine field at the Philadelphia Cricket Club, 22 men in white pants and cable-knit sweaters take their places. They may be gathered in the U.S. today, but most of the men grew up playing in countries where cricket is serious business.

Tobago, Guyana, India, Scotland — they come from all over. But here, at least, there isn't exactly an abundance of experienced players around. So when they find them, they scoop them up.

That's how Aussie David Anstice got recruited by a teammate.

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And part of what makes life go on is the love of sports. Our Tom Goldman joins us on a sad morning. Good morning, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Scott.

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#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. On Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you three items.

From Sarah McCammon, a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk:

Update 4:25 p.m. ET

Some called it unwatchable — and that wasn't just because the Jets and Bills were playing. Thursday night's NFL game is drawing criticism for featuring teams in all-red and all-green uniforms, making them virtually indecipherable to fans with red-green colorblindness.

The uniforms were part of the Nike's new "Color Rush" line, tied to a four-game promotion for the NFL's Thursday night games. But the combination of red and green drew a range of negative responses, on both practical and aesthetic counts.

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A high school runner was disqualified after finishing third in the Georgia cross-country AAAAA state championship race for wearing a headband with writing on it.

John Green, a senior at West Forsyth High School, ran the race wearing a white headband with a Bible verse written on it. After the race, he was disqualified for a uniform violation. Though the school appealed the disqualification, the Georgia High School Association has said the decision will stand.

This summer, football players at Northwestern University came very close to successfully forming a union — not to demand that they be paid, but to demand better scholarships and safety protocols. Had their bid succeeded, it might have changed college athletics — and, indeed, higher education — in some fundamental ways.

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U.S. leagues love playing games abroad. At first it was more just to show off our indigenous sports and hope the simpleminded foreigners would see what they were missing and start playing the red, white and blue games themselves.

New York state's attorney general has ordered the two biggest daily fantasy sports companies to stop accepting bets there. He says those games constitute illegal gambling under state law.

In making the announcement, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says the games "cause the same kinds of social and economic harm as other forms of illegal gambling" and mislead consumers:

In football, a sport that demands military-style discipline and singular focus, there's ample precedent for speaking out against the status quo.

What happened at the University of Missouri in recent days, with African-American football players calling for a boycott with the support of coaches, is dramatic, but it's the kind of action that was quite common around 50 years ago, according to historian Lane Demas, a professor at Central Michigan University.

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Daily fantasy sports have been getting a ton of publicity. It started with nonstop TV ads from companies that allow you to play fantasy sports for money.

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One day after an investigating committee said Russia's athletics system is plagued with rampant and systematic doping problems, the World Anti-Doping Agency has suspended Russia's official sports drug-testing lab.

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The World Anti-Doping Agency has found evidence of "deeply rooted culture of cheating" and use of performance-enhancing drugs by Russian athletes and coaches. It is calling for Russia to be suspended from international track events. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with German journalist Hajo Seppelt, who helped break the story.

The University of Illinois has fired its athletic director, Mike Thomas, following months of criticism about different athletic programs at the school.

The six horsewomen of the Castro clan are gathered in the center of the rodeo ring. They sit high on their imported sidesaddles, their ruffled skirts tucked neatly beneath them. These women are bound by blood or marriage. During the week, one works as a hairdresser, another is a nanny, two are students, and the others clean houses. But when the northern Virginia weather allows, they spend their Saturday afternoons on horseback.

Updated 7:50 p.m. ET

Over the weekend, players of color on the University of Missouri football team announced they would not participate in any football-related activities until university system president Tim Wolfe resigned, saying Wolfe had failed to address racist incidents on campus. As many have noted, the players' strike could have cost the university's football program millions of dollars.

This morning, Wolfe resigned.

They sit high on their imported sidesaddles, their ruffled skirts tucked neatly beneath them at a ranch in northern Virginia. Las Amazonas del Dorado — this riding group slated to perform — are preparing for their next ride.

These six women are engaging in the sport of escaramuza, a group riding event performed only by women at Mexican rodeos.

University of Missouri football players have pledged to go on strike until university President Tim Wolfe resigns. They're joining several other student groups criticizing the way he has handled a string of racially charged incidents. Koran Addo, a reporter for the St. Louis Post Dispatch, explains the situation.

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