slavery

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FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - A statue of the U.S. Supreme Court justice who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery will be removed from a City Hall courtyard in western Maryland this weekend.

Frederick officials announced Thursday that busts of Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney (TAW-nee) and a bust of Maryland's first governor and slave owner Thomas Johnson will be moved Saturday. Both will go to Mount Olivet Cemetery, where Johnson is buried.

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - The family of the chief justice who presided over the Supreme Court 160 years ago apologized to the family of a slave who sued for his freedom.

Don Rush

WASHINGTON (AP) - Maryland's U.S. senators are sponsoring legislation to bring a statue of Harriet Tubman to the U.S. Capitol Building.

The Maryland General Assembly passed legislation in 2012 creating the Harriet Tubman Statue Commission to raise money and commission a statue for display in the U.S. Capitol Building. But Congress must pass legislation to accept the donation.

The bill Sens. Chris Van Hollen and Ben Cardin announced Monday will direct the Joint Committee on the Libraries to enter into an agreement to accept the statue.

women on currency

Senator Chris Van Hollen paid tribute to former slave and abolitionist Harriet Tubman at a ceremony on the campus of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore.

The Maryland Democrat told the historically black college that it was important to mark the incredible story.

He said hoped legislation in Washington will soon allow a statue of Tubman in the nation’s capital.

President Obama slated her image to replace that of President Andrew Jackson on the twenty-dollar bill.

wikipedia

AUBURN, N.Y. (AP) - Federal parks officials have formally established the Harriet Tubman National Historical Park in upstate New York.

Members of the state's congressional delegation joined U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell in Washington, D.C., for the official signing ceremony Tuesday that makes the park part of the National Park Service system. It encompasses the site of Tubman's old home on the outskirts of Auburn, about 25 miles west of Syracuse, and a nearby church where she worshipped.

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FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - A court battle is brewing over the city of Frederick's plan to rid City Hall of a statue of the man who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery.

Three people have filed a petition for judicial review of the local historic commission's Oct. 13 decision approving the removal from a City Hall courtyard of the bust of Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney (TAW-nee), and a nearby bust of Maryland's first governor, Thomas Johnson, who owned slaves.

City aldermen voted in 2015 to remove the Taney statue, which some find offensive.

wikipedia

Harriet Tubman would never have imagined it.

But the picture of the abolitionist is set to grace the $20 dollar bill.

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew made the announcement yesterday for one of the most circulated denominations in the US.

Born in Dorchester County she escaped slavery in 1849 only to return a year later to rescue her niece who was about to be sold in Cambridge.

Tubman’s rescues as part of the Underground Railroad that led slaves to freedom became legendary.

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland House lawmakers have stalled a bill to revise the state song to remove Civil War-era references to "Northern scum" and other phrases some consider offensive.

A leading lawmaker said Thursday that House delegates voiced different opinions on what to do about "Maryland, My Maryland," the song written in 1861 and adopted in 1939.

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Governor Jack Markell is set to sign a measure that apologizes for Delaware’s role in the institution of slavery.

The measure acknowledges the cruelty and brutality of not only slavery but the injustice of the Jim Crow laws that imposed segregation for the next hundred years.

On the 150 anniversary of the ratification of the 13th amendment that ended slavery Markell said it was essential that the state publicly acknowledge the everlasting damage of “those sins.”

Governor's Office Flicker

Governor Jack Markell gave is last state of the state address yesterday hailing the changes that have taken place as Delaware emerges from the Great Recession.

The Delaware Democrat said the state must still evolve calling for higher pay for teachers and to meet the changing economy he wanted to expand job training programs.

In addition, he said it was time to revamping health care coverage for state employees.

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WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) - The state House has approved a resolution apologizing for Delaware's role in slavery and wrongs committed against blacks during the Jim Crow era.

The resolution passed on a 38-1 vote Thursday and now goes to the Senate.  Gov. Jack Markell has said he supports the measure.

Chief House sponsor Rep. Stephanie Bolden acknowledged that the resolution is a symbolic measure aimed at promoting "reconciliation and healing."

The resolution states that it is the General Assembly's intent that it not be used in, or be the basis for, any litigation.

creative commons

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) - Gov. Jack Markell has announced his support for a resolution that condemns and apologizes for slavery.

On the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, Gov. Markell visited the congregation at Bethel AME Church Sunday morning, saying he joins House representatives in support of a joint resolution that will say Delaware denounces and deplores slavery.

sons of confederate veterans logo

ROANOKE, Va. (AP) - The prospect of a Confederate battle flag flying in a holiday parade in Roanoke has prompted civil rights officials to call on the city to ban the Civil War symbol of the South.

The Sons of Confederate Veterans are scheduled to march Friday in The Roanoke Times Dickens of a Christmas parade.

At a news conference Saturday, the president of the city chapter of the NAACP called on city officials to banish the flag from the parade route, according to the Times.

kgov.com

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) - Delaware's Human Relations Commission voted to urge Gov. Jack Markell and state lawmakers to issue a formal apology for slavery.
 
The Wilmington News Journal reports the 24-member commission voted unanimously during a special meeting Tuesday. The commission is a state panel charged with promoting positive relationships among racial and ethnic groups.
 

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DOVER, Del. (AP) - Gov. Jack Markell is issuing a posthumous pardon for a free black man from Kent County who was convicted almost 170 years ago of helping slaves trying to escape from their owners on the Underground Railroad.

Descendants of Samuel D. Burris planned to join Markell and state lawmakers on Monday for a ceremony at the Old State House in Dover, the same location where Burris's trial was held.

Officials also will dedicate a new historical marker honoring Burris.

19th century sketch

A free black man convicted of helping slaves escape to freedom in the 19th century is to be posthumously pardoned by Delaware's governor.

Ocea Thomas of Atlanta said in a telephone interview Tuesday that she received a phone call this weekend letting her know that Gov. Jack Markell would pardon Samuel Burris, a free black man and conductor on the Underground Railroad who died in the 1860s and is one of Thomas' ancestors.

Phone and email messages left Tuesday for Markell's spokeswoman, Kelly Bachman, weren't immediately returned.

pbs.org

FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - Frederick officials have approved a resolution to move a bronze bust of the U.S. Supreme Court chief justice who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery.

The Frederick News-Post reports that the Board of Alderman's unanimous decision Thursday begins a process that could lead to removing the bust of Roger Brooke Taney (TAW'-nee) from outside City Hall, where it has been since 1931.

Alderwoman Donna Kuzemchak says other commissions will be asked for their input on possibly relocating the statue.

government photograph

FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - It's been vandalized, glorified and criticized. Now Frederick's Board of Aldermen must decide whether a bronze bust of the U.S. Supreme Court chief justice who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery should be removed from the grounds of City Hall.

The scheduled vote Thursday night follows years of debate about the legacy of Roger Brooke Taney (TAW'-nee), who practiced law in Frederick before becoming the nation's fifth chief justice.

Creative Commons

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland's Board of Public Works has approved a $100,000 grant for a memorial to abolitionist Frederick Douglass.

The board voted on Wednesday on the proposed grant from Maryland Historical Trust's African American Heritage Preservation Program.

The memorial is being built in the plaza in front of Hornbake Library at the University of Maryland College Park campus. It will be called Frederick Douglass Square.

The memorial will feature Douglass quotations on a steel wall, paving stones, planting beds, and benches.

Don Rush

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland's Board of Public Works is scheduled to vote on a $100,000 grant for a memorial to abolitionist Frederick Douglass.

The Board will vote Wednesday on the proposed grant from Maryland Historical Trust's African American Heritage Preservation Program.

The memorial is being built in the plaza in front of Hornbake Library at the University of Maryland College Park campus. It will be called Frederick Douglass Square.

The memorial will feature Douglass quotations on a steel wall, paving stones, planting beds, and benches.

government photograph

FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - Frederick city officials are considering a proposal to remove from City Hall a sculpture of the U.S. Supreme Court justice who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery.

The plan proposed last week by Alderman Donna Kuzemchak (koo-ZAM'-chak) is on the agenda for Wednesday's workshop meeting of the Board of Alderman. No decision is expected.

Supporters of the proposal say they equate the bust of Roger Brooke Taney (TAW'-ney) with the Confederate battle flag.

government photograph

FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - A Frederick alderwoman is renewing a call for removing a statue of U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney from City Hall.

Taney wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision upholding slavery. The ruling became a catalyst for the Civil War.  It called black people "beings of an inferior order."

Taney practiced law in Frederick from 1801 to 1823.

creative commons

DELMAR, Del. (AP) - Dozens of Confederate flag supporters held a rally Saturday as they drove to the Delaware Confederate veterans monument in Georgetown.

The Wilmington News Journal  reports that more than more 40 drivers participated in the procession. The drivers started in Delmar and then drove to Harrington and Georgetown.

Organizer Kenneth Morris, with the Sussex County Mudslingerz organization, says he was helping to lead the rally in order to defend what he called his "heritage."

Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles

DANVILLE, Va. (AP) - A judge in the Virginia city that was the final refuge for the Confederacy is set to hear arguments over the state's bid to erase the Confederate battle flag from license plates.

The hearing Friday in Danville comes as the city grapples with the enduring symbols of the Confederacy, a debate sparked across the South by the killings of nine African-Americans in a Charleston, South Carolina, church in June.

The suspect in the shootings had been photographed posing with a Confederate battle flag.

An Apology for Slavery?

Jul 8, 2015
Historical drawing

There could be an apology for slavery in Delaware.

Governor Jack Markell received a request for such a proclamation last week from Harmon Carey, founder and executive director of the Afro-American Historical Society in Wilmington.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that he wrote that there was a “moral imperative”0 to acknowledge the inhumanity of slavery and the unjust prosecution of Abolitionists.

Carey says he believes an apology would heal the wounds still being felt to this day.

creative commons

DOVER, Del. (AP) - Gov. Jack Markell's office is mulling a request to pardon three 19th-century Delawareans convicted of helping smuggle slaves.

Pennsylvania resident Robert Seeley has asked Markell to pardon his ancestor, Thomas Garrett, a prominent Quaker abolitionist credited with helping more than 2,700 slaves reach freedom. Seeley also is seeking pardons for John Hunn and his partner, Samuel Burris, a free black man. Hunn was convicted with Garrett in 1848 for aiding a slave family.

creative commons

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) - A descendant of a Delaware man credited with helping more than 2,700 slaves reach freedom is asking Gov. Jack Markell to pardon his ancestor and two others.

Sixty-four-year-old Robert Seeley of Havertown, Pennsylvania, got the idea after outgoing Illinois' governor granted clemency on New Year's Eve to three abolitionists convicted for hiding and helping escaped slaves.

Seeley says he sent Markell his request on Facebook on New Year's Day, and then again in an email Monday.

creative commons

BALTIMORE (AP) - Maryland is celebrating the 150th anniversary marking the end of slavery in the state, a milestone that came after the Emancipation Proclamation.

While President Abraham Lincoln signed the proclamation in January 1863, slavery remained in place for many states, including Maryland.

Maryland amended its constitution on Nov. 1, 1864, more than a year before slavery was abolished nationwide with the 13th Amendment.

creative commons wikimedia

This evening the Seaford Town Council is set to vote on whether to put up a monument to former slave and abolitionist Harriet Tubman.

Jim Blackwell, a local historian told WBOC, that on October 22nd, 1856 Tubman passed through Seaford aboard the Steamer Kent a boat that came from Baltimore.

He said that she brought with her a slave named Tilly who was trying to escape from the south.

Blackwell said that Tubman brought Tilly to the only hotel in Seaford.

That plot of land is located at the Gateway Park across from the town hall.

Don Rush

Site

In Easton, archeologists from the University of Maryland and researchers at Morgan State are carrying out small excavations to uncover evidence of what could be the oldest neighborhood of free African Americans in the country.

The Hill

The neighborhood known as The Hill claims the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church established in 1818 and the home of Grace Brooks, a free black woman, who bought a home there in 1792. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush visited the site and prepared this report: