pollution

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DARLINGTON, Md. (AP) - Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is planning to make an announcement after the second Conowingo Dam Summit.

The event is scheduled for Tuesday in Darlington.

The Hogan administration has been focusing on ways to reduce Chesapeake Bay pollution that comes by way of the dam. The Republican governor highlighted the significance of addressing sediment overflows at the dam during his 2014 campaign.

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The Environmental Protection Agency could be coming to the aid of businesses and residents near Newark to clean up some polluted groundwater.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that there are two plumes of polluted water near the Delaware Route 72 corridor.

Along with local businesses there is also a city well-water plant in the area.

Delaware environmental officials say the water has been polluted with tetrachloroethylene which the federal government says is carcinogenic.

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BALTIMORE (AP) - Scientists say the Conowingo Dam is no longer holding back pollution in the Susquehanna River from entering the Chesapeake Bay.

The Baltimore Sun is reporting that Gov. Larry Hogan will announce a plan to make progress at the dam, based on proposals the state has received from private industry.

Hogan told the newspaper he will seek a contractor next month to deal with the sediment and dissolved phosphorous and nitrogen pollution that erodes the health of the nation's largest estuary.

Don Rush

The Nanticoke River has received a grade of C+ from an environmental group.

This is down from the Nanticoke Watershed Alliance report in 2015.

WBOC reports that the downgrade is probably due to localized rain fall during the summer and fall of 2016.

In addition, samples at the Transquaking River showed high bacteria levels than in the past indicating human activity including septic tank or other sewage leakage.  

Over 40 citizen scientists participated in the monitoring taking samples and measurements every other week from late March through early November.  

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DOVER, Del. (AP) - A proposal to open Delaware's environmentally protected coastal zone to new heavy industry is getting its first hearing in the legislature.

A House committee hearing on the bill was set for Wednesday amid opposition from several environmental groups.

The bill establishes a permitting process for new use of 14 existing industry sites, most of them abandoned and polluted brownfields.

Delaware Center for Inland Bays

A Delaware task force says that the state needs to do more to clean up its waterways.

So, it has proposed that the First State’s residents shell out $40 to $80 a year to pay for it.

This would be added to an individual’s income taxes with a $45 surcharge on business license fees.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that officials say that would raise around $20 million each year.

That money would then go to deal with cleaning up pollution and investment in infrastructure.

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Breathing might be just a little easier in Kent and Sussex Counties.

The American Lung Association says in its annual report that they received an A for daily and annual particle pollution.

WBOC also reports overall they did improve from an F rating in 2015.

The report also looks at the number of days of pollution from ozone smog.

Lung Association believes that diesel exhaust and coal-fired generators is the cause of much of the pollution.

Don Rush

It may be a blip but the Wicomico River has the highest levels of fecal bacteria in its recorded history and algae has made a comeback.

That was the conclusion of a report by the environmental group Wicomico Creekwatchers.

Given the rainy season last year it is believed to be a onetime event.

Judith Stribling, a biology professor at Salisbury University and with the Creekwatchers, told the Salisbury Daily Times that wet years always look bad while dry years produce better results.

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Supporters of doing more to protect forests in Maryland are holding a rally.

It's being held Wednesday in front of the Maryland State House before a hearing on legislation to strengthen the state's Forest Conservation Act.

State reports indicate more than 14,480 acres of forest have been lost to development statewide in the past eight years. That's despite a law intended to minimize the clearing of forests, which helps reduce pollution runoff into the bay.

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There's a new report that finds the health benefits from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative between 2009-2014 added up to $5.7 billion. The initiative covers the northeast states with the exception of Pennsylvania. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush spoke about the new report with Professor Sara Via who is with the University of Maryland, College Park biology department and co-lead on the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility's Climate Health Action Team .

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