phospherous

Don Rush

A new environmental report says that improvement for habitat areas in the Delaware Inland Bays has stalled.

It also reports that the water quality in the bays is still rated fair or poor.

WBOC says that the report by the Delaware Center for the Inland Bays found the largest non-point source of nutrient pollution came from fertilizers, animal waste and storm water runoff.  

But the report notes that of the original 13 point sources of discharges into the bay are only two left.

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The U.S. Supreme Court has turned back a challenge by the American Farm Bureau Federation and others to the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint.

The Farm Bureau claimed that the Environmental Protection Agency exceeded its authority in efforts to clean up the Bay and its tributaries.

The high court’s decision let’s stand lower court panel’s ruling that the EPA did not exceed it authority.  

The Farm Bureau and the National Association of Homebuilders among others had argued that the Blueprint trampled on state authority in setting clean up goals for the Bay.

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The poultry industry attacked a measure in Annapolis that would make poultry companies responsible for absorbing excess chicken manure.

During a four hour hearing yesterday before a legislative committee Dave Patey with Mountaire Farms blasted the measure saying that it demonstrates that Maryland is becoming unfriendly to business.

Meanwhile, environmental groups staged a protest yesterday saying that the legislation would be better for small farmers because the poultry firms have deeper pockets.

Don Rush

The latest proposal by the Maryland Department of Agriculture regulating phosphorous levels has been scrapped before it voted on the new rules.

The department held two rounds of public hearings where strong opposition came from the poultry industry.

However, the department said it will continue to work with stakeholders to come up with a set of regulations which will be resubmitted sometime next year.

Don Rush

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland's Agriculture Department has withdrawn its request to seek emergency status on proposed regulations on fertilizer use aimed at reducing Chesapeake Bay pollution.

The department announced it was pulling back the request on Monday. That's two days before a legislative panel was scheduled to take up the proposal.

The department sought emergency status in order to get the regulations in place in time for the fall planting season. The regulations are designed to use new research to reduce the amount of phosphorous that gets into waterways.