ignition interlock

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - The group Mothers Against Drunk Driving will release its first report on the number of times drunken drivers are stopped from using their vehicles by ignition interlock devices in all 50 states.

The group will release the report Wednesday in Annapolis.

MADD is releasing the report in a state where lawmakers are pushing to require all drunken drivers with blood alcohol content of .08 or greater to have the ignition interlock devices.

State law now requires them for those with a BAC of 0.15, nearly twice the legal limit for driving.

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Supporters of putting ignition interlocks in the vehicles of all drunk drivers in Maryland are moving quickly to underscore how it could save lives.

Del. Ben Kramer and Sen. Jamie Raskin held a news conference Wednesday with Lisa Spicknall, the state program director of Mothers Against Drunk Driving.

They were joined by Capt. Tom Didone, a Montgomery County police officer and a colleague of Officer Noah Leotta, who was killed in December while working on a driving under the influence assignment.

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WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) - Gov. Jack Markell is signing legislation that requires all people convicted of drunken driving in Delaware to have ignition interlock devices installed on vehicles they drive.  

The bill to be signed Wednesday cleared the General Assembly in June on the final day of this year's legislative session.

Previously, interlock devices were required only for first offenders arrested with a blood-alcohol concentration of .15 or higher or who refused to take a chemical test, and for repeat drunken drivers.  

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DOVER, Del. (AP) - State lawmakers have given final passage to a bill requiring all people convicted of drunken driving in Delaware to have ignition interlock devices installed on vehicles they drive. 

The Senate passed the measure on a 20-to-1 vote Monday on the final day of the legislative session. The legislation now goes to Gov. Jack Markell for his signature.

Currently, interlock devices are required only for first offenders arrested with a blood-alcohol concentration of .15 or higher or who refuse to take a chemical test, and for repeat drunken drivers.