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Let's talk for a few more minutes about one of the key reasons the president gave for pulling the U.S. out of the climate accord. He said it was to save American jobs such as the jobs in coal.

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This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

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Trump's withdrawal from the Paris Agreement is where we start with our Friday political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and The Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times. Good to see you both.

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In explaining his decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement, President Trump said the deal hurt American industry.

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When President Trump announced this week that he was taking the United States out of the Paris climate agreement, there were swift and vocal reactions from many industries --- but most of the organizations that represent American agriculture were silent.

Chris Clayton, though, a veteran reporter at one of the leading farm publications in the country, took to Twitter:

As he announced his decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, President Trump said he was putting American jobs ahead of the needs and desires of other countries.

"I was elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris," he said Thursday.

Trump said the agreement was "very unfair" for the U.S., especially the U.S. coal industry. And he alluded to some recent good news for the battered industry: the development of new mines.

Michael Bloomberg is pledging to fill a funding gap created by President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord, offering up to $15 million to support the U.N. agency that helps countries implement the agreement.

Friday News Roundup - International

Jun 2, 2017

Afghanistan’s president says cowards were behind this week’s bombing in Kabul. After their latest meeting, Germany’s Chancellor calls out President Trump. And of course, the President makes his decision on the Paris climate accord. A panel of journalists joins Joshua Johnson for analysis of the week’s top international news stories.

GUESTS

Susan Glasser, Chief international affairs columnist, Politico

Eli Lake, Columnist, Bloomberg View

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Jun 2, 2017

Paris deals, Jared’s secret channels and a spate of worrying hate crimes seen across the country. Plus, the ongoing mystery that surrounds covfefe. A panel of journalists joins Joshua Johnson for analysis of the week’s top national news stories.

GUESTS

Ed O’Keefe, Congressional correspondent, The Washington Post

Nia-Malika Henderson, Senior political reporter, CNN

Reid Wilson, National correspondent, The Hill

After President Trump announced that the U.S. would be withdrawing from the international agreement to fight climate change, the responses were immediate — from denunciation to celebration.

And some reactions were particularly pointed — and personal.

French President Emmanuel Macron gave an address, in English, in which he riffed on Trump's campaign slogan.

"Make our planet great again," Macron said, calling the decision to leave the agreement a mistake and inviting scientists in the U.S. to "come and work here with us" on efforts to combat climate change.

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Millions of jobs over the next decade - that's what President Donald Trump said was at stake if the U.S. stayed in the Paris climate deal.

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World leaders, scientists and a whole lot of business executives pleaded with him not to do it, but it was a promise Donald Trump had made over and over again to his base.

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And let's listen to another perspective now on the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement. Matthew Continetti is the editor of the conservative Washington Free Beacon.

Matthew, thanks for coming in.

Can white artists understand the racial traumas people of color undergo in America enough to apply them to their work? Creating art about cultures other than your own — especially of populations that have been marginalized or oppressed — has once again come under fire.

Crude oil is now flowing through the Dakota Access Pipeline, despite months of protests against it by Native American tribes and environmental groups.

The pipeline spans more than 1,000 miles from North Dakota to Illinois and cost some $3.8 billion to construct. It is expected to transport approximately 520,000 barrels of oil daily.

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During the campaign, President Trump vowed to, quote, "cancel U.S. participation" in an historic international agreement, the Paris climate accord. Today, he did it.

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