Environment

Americans throw away about a third of our available food.

But what some see as trash, others are seeing as a business opportunity. A new facility known as the Heartland Biogas Project is taking wasted food from Colorado's most populous areas and turning it into electricity. Through a technology known as anaerobic digestion, spoiled milk, old pet food and vats of grease combine with helpful bacteria in massive tanks to generate gas.

Renewable energy like solar and wind is booming across the country as the costs of production have come down. But the sun doesn't always shine, and the wind doesn't blow when we need it to.

This challenge has sparked a technology race to store energy — one that goes beyond your typical battery.

Heat Storage: Molten Salt And A Giant Solar Farm

Batteries are often used to store solar power, but it can be a costly endeavor.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Don Rush

The Maryland state senate has approved a measure that would require the University of Maryland to set harvesting levels for the oysters in the Chesapeake Bay.

The aim is to create a sustainable stock of oysters for the future.  

The measure’s supporters say that the state’s oyster population is being over harvested.

But the seafood industry says the new measures would be too costly and are unnecessary.

The legislation is now pending in the House of Delegates.

Living on Earth: April 1, 2016

Apr 3, 2016

New York Confronts Exxon On Climate Risks / Dam Funders Halt Support After Murders In Honduras / Beyond the Headlines / Clearing The View For The Grand Canyon / Sexual Harassment Blights National Parks and Forests

Women in some divisions of the Forest Service and Park Service are now coming forward with disturbing stories of sexual harassment in the work place, ending public silence about years of abuse and official neglect. An investigation by the Inspector General of the Department of the Interior has now confirmed that there has been a long-term pattern of sexual harassment and a hostile work environment in Grand Canyon National Park.

New York Confronts Exxon On Climate Risks

Apr 3, 2016

Thomas DiNapoli iis the Comptroller of New York State and trustee of its $178.3 billion Pension Fund. He won an appeal to the Securities and Exchange Commission to force ExxonMobil to report the risks the oil giant will face from climate change and likely increased fossil fuel regulation. Comptroller DiNapoli tells host Steve Curwood that states and their pension funds can help shape industry’s response to global warming. (published April 1, 2016)

Two major financiers of the Agua Zarca dam project in Honduras have suspended their financial support in the wake of the high-profile murders of Berta Cáceres and Nelson Garcia, activists who opposed the dam. Peter Bosshard of International Rivers and host Steve Curwood discuss the potential far-reaching consequences for development international aid programs. (published April 1, 2016)

Clearing The View For The Grand Canyon

Apr 3, 2016

Cement plants are big air polluters and in 2009 industrial giant Cemex wanted to build a new plant near the Grand Canyon, causing concern about increasing the haze that already plagues the national park. We revisit a report by Arizona Public Radio’s Laurel Morales, and host Steve Curwood catches up on the story with environmental engineer Bill Auberle who discusses current threats facing the iconic attraction and hopeful signs for its future. (published April 1, 2016)

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

If you've been following any of the big news stories on food fraud lately, you'll know that it's tough to know what exactly is in our food — and where it's been before it makes it onto our dinner plates.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Two major financiers of the Agua Zarca dam project in Honduras have suspended their financial support in the wake of the high-profile murders of Berta Cáceres and Nelson Garcia, activists who opposed the dam. Peter Bosshard of International Rivers and host Steve Curwood discuss the potential far-reaching consequences for development international aid programs. (published April 1, 2016)


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Beyond the Headlines

Apr 2, 2016

Peter Dykstra’s weekly round-up with host Steve Curwood discusses the US lag in high-speed rail system development, the decline in workplace deaths over the past few decades, and how famed crime boss “Lucky” Luciano was never convicted of murder, but fined for one death he caused--by shooting a pheasant out of season. (published April 1, 2016)


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Clearing The View For The Grand Canyon

Apr 2, 2016

Cement plants are big air polluters and in 2009 industrial giant Cemex wanted to build a new plant near the Grand Canyon, causing concern about increasing the haze that already plagues the national park. We revisit a report by Arizona Public Radio’s Laurel Morales, and host Steve Curwood catches up on the story with environmental engineer Bill Auberle who discusses current threats facing the iconic attraction and hopeful signs for its future. (published April 1, 2016)


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Living on Earth: April 1, 2016

Apr 2, 2016

New York Confronts Exxon On Climate Risks / Dam Funders Halt Support After Murders In Honduras / Beyond the Headlines / Clearing The View For The Grand Canyon / Sexual Harassment Blights National Parks and Forests


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Women in some divisions of the Forest Service and Park Service are now coming forward with disturbing stories of sexual harassment in the work place, ending public silence about years of abuse and official neglect. An investigation by the Inspector General of the Department of the Interior has now confirmed that there has been a long-term pattern of sexual harassment and a hostile work environment in Grand Canyon National Park.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Crisis and Response

About Ken Kamler's TED Talk

Physician Ken Kamler describes his experience as a doctor on Mount Everest during one of its deadliest days in its history.

About Ken Kamler

Copyright 2016 Michigan Radio. To see more, visit Michigan Radio.

Tesla, the maker of electric vehicles, Thursday night unveiled its mass-market Model 3. The car is expected to have a range of 215 miles at a base price of $35,000 ($27,500 after federal tax credits).

Tesla CEO Elon Musk told a crowd of loyal fans in Hawthorne, Calif., he is "fairly confident" the vehicle will go on sale in 2017. That the assembled crowd laughed at the statement is a sign of the near-cult following Tesla (and Musk) enjoy.

By 10 p.m. PDT, the company had received 140,000 advance orders, according to Musk, for a car almost no one had seen.

It was a controversial move when Madison, Wis., decided to replace all its lead pipes in 2001. But that decision put the city ahead of the curve — allowing it to avoid the lead water contamination that is plaguing cities like Flint, Mich., now.

Madison started using copper instead of lead water pipes in the late 1920s. The bulk of the lead lines were located in the older part of the city, which is downtown near Wisconsin's state Capitol.

Copyright 2016 Alaska Public Telecommunications Inc.. To see more, visit Alaska Public Telecommunications Inc..

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Water safety concerns aren't just in Flint, Mich., these days. Communities in three states in the Northeast have found elevated levels of a suspected carcinogen — perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA.

Used to make Teflon, the chemical has contaminated water supplies in New York, New Hampshire and Vermont.

After a four-month ban in the village of Hoosick Falls, N.Y., the New York State Department of Health declared the water safe to drink and cook with again on Wednesday. A temporary filtering system has brought PFOA levels down to nondetectable levels for weeks.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

On a cold night in January 2012, Dustin Bergsing climbed on top of a crude oil storage tank in North Dakota's Bakken oil field. His job was to open the hatch on top and drop a rope inside to measure the level of oil. But just after midnight, a co-worker found him dead, slumped next to the open hatch.

Massive 'Bleaching' Affects Great Barrier Reef

Mar 29, 2016

Huge areas of the Great Barrier Reef are experiencing "the worst, mass bleaching event in its history" according to Australia's National Coral Bleaching Task Force, which has just completed an aerial survey of the more than 500 individual reefs that make up the northern part of the reef.

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