Environment

Arizona Tribes Wade Into The Water Business

Jan 18, 2016
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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Separation of church and state? When it comes to fighting food waste, the U.S. government is looking to partner up with the faithful.

Copyright 2016 Wyoming Public Radio Network. To see more, visit Wyoming Public Radio Network.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Florida's Everglades is known for its alligators, and in recent years, pythons. Burmese pythons aren't native to the Everglades. But over the last two decades, the snakes, which can grow up to 20 feet, have become established there and taken a big toll on native wildlife.

With the pythons, there's another new Florida species — the python hunter. They've been featured on National Geographic and the Discovery Channel. And hunters are descending on the Everglades this month for a competition — the Python Challenge.

Today marks a major milestone in the Iran nuclear deal.

It's known as Implementation Day, the day when the International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA, says that Iran has curbed its nuclear program enough to begin receiving relief on sanctions. The terms were laid out last July by Iran, the U.S. and five other world powers.

President Obama recently delivered his final State of the Union address, outlining his vision for the last year of his Presidency and beyond. Host Steve Curwood chats with Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News about the speech and what signals it sends about President Obama’s environmental agenda in the months ahead. (published January 15, 2016)

Saving a Bear Cub

Jan 16, 2016

2015's heat and drought in Montana forced many black bear families to forage far from their natural habitat, and many young cubs were orphaned during the trek. Reporter Clay Scott follows game wardens as they rescue one such cub and transport him to safety. (published January 15, 2016)

Polar Bear Summits Talus Mound

Jan 16, 2016

Up in the arctic north of Canada’s Akpatok Island, a large, male polar bear climbs crags in search of murre fledglings, but instead finds a plane full of sightseers rounding the bluff, surprising each other. Writer Mark Seth Lender reports from the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Nunavut, Canada. (published January 15, 2016)

GOP Campaigns Diverge on Climate Questions

Jan 16, 2016

In the mere weeks leading up to the nation’s first presidential primary election in New Hampshire, Republican candidates are campaigning heavily in a vital effort to sway voters. Host Steve Curwood tracked down Florida Governor Jeb Bush, Ohio Governor John Kasich and Florida Senator Marco Rubio to find out how the candidates would address climate change, if they occupied the White House. (published January 15, 2016)

Financing the Renewable Revolution

Jan 16, 2016

During the December 2015 climate summit in Paris, nearly 200 countries have effectively pledged to phase out fossil fuels by 2050 to help curb global warming. Host Steve Curwood and green financier Tom Steyer discuss the economics of this transition, including how California’s carbon pricing system is creating jobs and growth, and what could work in developing countries like India. (published January 15, 2016)

Living on Earth: January 15, 2016

Jan 16, 2016

President Obama and the State of the Environment / GOP Campaigns Diverge on Climate Questions / The Changing Climate in the GOP Race / Financing the Renewable Revolution / Saving a Bear Cub / Polar Bear Summits Talus Mound

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

More Bad News For Coal Mine-Reliant States

Jan 16, 2016
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

In President Obama's State of the Union address, there was a line you might have missed, but it caught the ear of people in the energy industry.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The company that owns the leaking natural gas well in Los Angeles understated the number of air samples showing higher-than-usual levels of benzene, The Associated Press reports.

Adding to concerns over the disaster, efforts to stop the leak appear to have destabilized the well, the Los Angeles Times reports, raising the risk of a blowout.

Citing concerns over pricing and pollution, the Obama administration on Friday unveiled a moratorium on new coal leases on federal lands. The change won't affect existing leases, which generated nearly $1.3 billion for the government last year.

The Department of the Interior says it wants to make sure the money it's charging for coal leases takes into account both market prices and what's often called the "social costs" of coal — its impact on climate change and public health.

The agency says federal lands account for roughly 40 percent of all U.S. coal production.

Millions of bats are dying due to a deadly disease sweeping across the United States, their tiny bodies strewn across cave floors.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Since October, a leaking underground natural gas storage facility near Los Angeles has released vast amounts of methane, its main ingredient, into the atmosphere, becoming one of the nation’s worst environmental accidents, as methane starts off 100 times more potent than CO2 as a greenhouse gas. Host Steve Curwood and Anthony Ingraffea, a civil and environmental engineer at Cornell University discuss the blowout, including. Professor Ingraffea's belief that this disaster may be a harbinger of what's ahead for these aging storage facilities. (published January 8, 2016)

Cleaning Up A Coal-Fired Power Plant

Jan 13, 2016

Coal-fired power plants must clean up their emissions to comply with expected EPA air rules. The Allegheny Front's Reid Frazier visits the Homer City Generating Station in Indiana County, Pennsylvania as they install upgrades to reduce toxic mercury emissions. (published January 8, 2016)

Debunking the Myths About Hunger

Jan 13, 2016

In their new book, World Hunger: 10 Myths, Frances Moore Lappé and coauthor Joseph Collins make the case that there’s plenty of food to go around, but it’s just not getting to those who need it most. Lappé and host Steve Curwood discuss how tackling inequality and expanding democracy can feed the world. (published January 8, 2016)

Beyond the Headlines

Jan 13, 2016

In this week’s trip beyond the headlines, Peter Dykstra and host Steve Curwood discuss the armed takeover of a wildlife refuge facility in Oregon, debate a new ban on microbeads, and remember the implementation of the 55-mile per hour speed limit. (published January 8, 2016)

Living on Earth: January 8, 2016

Jan 13, 2016

Massive Natural Gas Disaster Hits Los Angeles / Renewable Energy Boosted in Federal Budget Compromise / Cleaning Up A Coal-Fired Power Plant / Beyond the Headlines / Debunking the Myths About Hunger

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In sunny Nevada, solar panel companies are shutting down operations. It's a protest of sorts because state regulators changed the rules.

Here's NPR's Jeff Brady.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Two teams of geologists say portions of the seafloor along the Aleutian Islands in southwestern Alaska could produce tsunamis more devastating than anything seen in the past century. They say California and Hawaii are directly in the line of fire.

The California Air Resources Board has rejected Volkswagen's plan to recall cars with 2-liter diesel engines that trick emissions tests, saying the company's plan is incomplete. The Environmental Protection Agency says it concurs.

The bananas you find in the average U.S. grocery store are pretty much the same: They're the genetic variety known as Cavendish.

In the market in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico, though, you have choices.

A new traffic law has some New Delhi residents wondering: "How the heck do I get to work?"

Following the lead of Beijing and Mexico City, the Delhi government put into effect an "odd-even" policy for cars starting Jan. 1. Residents can only drive their cars on either odd or even days, based on the last digit of their license plate numbers — though everyone gets a pass before 8 a.m., after 8 p.m. and on weekends.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We have a glimpse this morning of a community facing environmental disaster. It's an affluent area in the far reaches of Los Angeles. And for months now, it's been the site of a massive natural gas leak.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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