Dred Scott

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - A Maryland state senator wants the chamber to censure Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller over remarks about Roger Taney.

A monument to the late U.S. Supreme Court justice, who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision that upheld slavery and denied citizenship to African Americans, was removed Friday from the Maryland State House grounds in Annapolis.

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - A statue of the of the U.S. Supreme Court justice who wrote the Dred Scott decision that upheld slavery and denied citizenship to African-Americans has been removed from the grounds of the Maryland State House.

The statue of Roger B. Taney was lifted away by a crane at about 2 a.m. Friday. It was lowered into a truck and driven away.

A panel voted by email Wednesday to remove the statue, which was erected in 1872.

creative commons

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is asking for the removal of a statue of the Supreme Court justice who wrote a decision upholding slavery that sits on the front law of the state house.

Hogan said in a statement on Tuesday that he believes removing the Roger B. Taney (TAW-nee) statue from the State House grounds is the right thing to do.

The Republican governor's statement comes a day after Speaker of the House Michael E. Busch, a Democrat, said the Confederate monument doesn't belong at the state house in Annapolis.

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FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - A statue of the U.S. Supreme Court justice who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery will be removed from a City Hall courtyard in western Maryland this weekend.

Frederick officials announced Thursday that busts of Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney (TAW-nee) and a bust of Maryland's first governor and slave owner Thomas Johnson will be moved Saturday. Both will go to Mount Olivet Cemetery, where Johnson is buried.

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - The family of the chief justice who presided over the Supreme Court 160 years ago apologized to the family of a slave who sued for his freedom.

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FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - A court battle is brewing over the city of Frederick's plan to rid City Hall of a statue of the man who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery.

Three people have filed a petition for judicial review of the local historic commission's Oct. 13 decision approving the removal from a City Hall courtyard of the bust of Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney (TAW-nee), and a nearby bust of Maryland's first governor, Thomas Johnson, who owned slaves.

City aldermen voted in 2015 to remove the Taney statue, which some find offensive.

pbs.org

FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - A Maryland city's plan to rid its City Hall courtyard of a statue of the man who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery won't be second-guessed by the state.

Maryland Historical Trust Director Elizabeth Hughes wrote in a Sept. 2 letter to officials in Frederick that the agency lacks jurisdiction because the bust of Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney (TAW'-nee) is not covered by an easement for a 1983 building preservation grant.

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CROWNSVILLE, Md. (AP) - A state panel is reviewing a proposal to remove from the grounds of Frederick City Hall a statue of the Supreme Court chief justice who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery.

It's on the agenda for Tuesday's meeting of the Maryland Historical Trust's Easement Committee in Crownsville. The committee makes recommendations to the trust's director. Its meetings are closed to the public.

pbs.org

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - A bill before the Maryland House of Delegates would remove from the Maryland State House grounds a statue of the Supreme Court chief justice who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery.

The Frederick News-Post reports that the bill regarding the statue of Roger Brooke Taney was introduced Monday by Democrat Jill Carter of Baltimore.

It comes amid a national debate about the appropriateness of racially divisive symbols in public spaces.

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BALTIMORE (AP) - A commission appointed by Baltimore's mayor is recommending that the city remove two of four Confederate monuments on public property.

The seven-member panel voted on Thursday to urge removal of Roger B. Taney Monument on Mount Vernon Place and the Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson Monument in the Wyman Park Dell, The Baltimore Sun reported.

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