Business

Money Coach
11:19 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Here's How You Protect Your Kids From Identity Theft

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 4:58 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to turn now to personal finance. We've been hearing a lot about identity theft in recent years. Law enforcement says it's one of the fastest growing crimes, and it can have serious repercussions. Victims of identity theft have often been denied credit they deserve and even jobs, not to mention the hours of time spent writing letters and making telephone calls to clean up the mess.

Read more
Business
5:20 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Time Warner, DirecTV Squabble Over Dodgers TV Network

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 11:15 am

The Dodgers launched a network to carry their games. But a dispute over broadcast fees and whether the network should be offered ala carte has kept it dark in 70 percent of the Los Angeles market.

Parallels
3:06 am
Tue May 13, 2014

The Global Economy: A World Of Acronyms

Shoppers gaze at a jewelry store display window in the Turkish capital Ankara on Feb. 19. Some economists have coined the term MINT to include the up-and-coming emerging markets of Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey. But Turkey has been hit by street protests, and others in the group have had their share of recent turbulence.
Adem Altan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 11:42 am

The world of finance gave birth in 2001 to a new buzzword: BRIC. The word is an acronym for Brazil, Russia, India and China. Jim O'Neill, an economist with Goldman Sachs who's been credited with coining the term, saw those four countries as turbo-charged engines among emerging markets, ones that would give Western economies a run for their money.

O'Neill says when he dreamed up the acronym 13 years ago, people didn't really focus on the potential importance of some of these countries.

Read more
Parallels
3:05 am
Tue May 13, 2014

The French Ask: Should We Be Building Warships For Russia?

The Vladivostok warship, a Mistral class LHD amphibious vessel ordered by Russia, at the STX France shipyard in Saint-Nazaire, France, on Friday. The Vladivostok is one of two ships Russia ordered from France.
Jean-Sebastien Evrard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 9:57 am

French President Francois Hollande says that for now, France intends to go through with a deal to build two warships for the Russian navy. The first of the Mistral-class assault vessels is supposed to be delivered in October.

The $1.6 billion deal is the biggest sale to Russia ever by a NATO country. And three years ago, when the contract was signed, French officials hailed it as a sign that Moscow should be considered a partner, not an enemy. Still, there were critics among NATO allies even then.

Read more
Economy
4:38 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

For Geithner, Financial Crisis Was Like Landing A Burning Plane

Then-Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies before the House Financial Services Committee in 2012. He says he struggled with communicating why he had to help the banks during the financial crisis.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 8:27 pm

Timothy Geithner was president of the New York Federal Reserve when the Wall Street bank Lehman Brothers collapsed in 2008. A few months later, he became Treasury secretary as the crisis deepened on his watch.

Geithner received mixed reviews of his performance during that time. Wall Street types take him for a champion of excessive government intervention and regulation, while Occupy Wall Street types consider him a tool of the banks. Geithner, however, says he was just trying to get the financial system out of a multifaceted crisis with the threat of a Great Depression looming.

Read more
Politics
12:07 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Is White House Doing Enough To 'Bring Back Our Girls'?

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 12:24 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to start the week with politics, but it is a political story that is hitting close to home for many Americans and, as it turns out, for the White House. There was a very personal message from the White House this weekend about the hundreds of school girls who were kidnapped in Nigeria in April by religious extremists. First lady Michelle Obama focused on the issue for her Mother's Day video statement.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Read more
NPR Story
5:06 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Mormon Bishop Highlights Health Coverage Gap Among Utah's Poor

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:06 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Many republican governors have taken a stand against Obamacare by refusing to expand Medicaid. Utah, which is one of the most republican states in the nation, remains undecided. But in a state where the majority of the population are Mormons, one bishop from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints says helping the poor is a moral obligation. Andrea Smardon from member station KUER in Salt Lake City has more.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHECKOUT SCANNER)

Read more
The Salt
4:07 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Why Take-And-Bake Pizza Is Giving The Tax Guys A Headache

Papa Murphy's is a chain that sells take-and-bake pizza. It built its name on low prices, and a willingness to accept food stamps. But now that may be in jeopardy.
Nicholas Eckhart Flickr

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 1:21 pm

In 24 states, a Hershey bar is candy but a Twix is not. That's because a Twix contains flour, and in those states — which all share a sales tax code — candy is defined as being flour-free. And since groceries aren't taxed, you'll pay tax for the Hershey but not for the Twix.

If that seems strange, consider the case of take-and-bake pizza — uncooked pies you take home and bake later. Take-and-bake is at the center of an ongoing tax-code debate. Many states consider it a grocery item, like eggs or flour. But now they're re-evaluating whether take-and-bake should be tax-free.

Read more
Business
5:40 am
Sun May 11, 2014

On Income Inequality: A French Economist Vs. An American Capitalist

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 9:11 am

Picture a cozy cafe. At a small table, an economics professor from Paris is chatting with a wealthy businessman from New York.

As they sip coffee, they discuss economic history, and often nod and agree.

Then, as they stand to leave, each states a conclusion drawn from their conversation. But what they say is exactly, completely opposite.

One says economic history proves governments must impose very heavy taxes to break up concentrations of wealth. The other says governments should cut taxes to encourage wealthy people to pursue even bigger profits.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:40 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

What Are The Most (And Least) Charitable U.S. States?

A map of the U.S. shows the states where residents were the most and least likely to say they had recently donated to charity.
Gallup

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 6:55 pm

There are only two U.S. states where at least 50 percent of residents say they've recently given either money or time to charity: Utah and Minnesota, according to a new Gallup poll. Nevada and Kentucky tied for the lowest rate of charitable giving.

The poll was conducted in the last six months of 2013, when at least 600 residents of each state were asked whether they had donated money to a charity or volunteered at an organization within the past month.

Read more
Economy
12:18 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Controversy Over Spouses Of Tech-Saavy Immigrants Working In US

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 12:39 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'd like to begin today's program by talking about immigration. This week the Obama administration announced plans to allow the spouses of some highly skilled, temporary immigrants to work in the United States. The administration hopes this change will help keep the best and brightest technology workers and scientists in this country. But there are critics on both sides. Some say the proposal is too narrow, others say their promise leaves fewer jobs for Americans.

Read more
Planet Money
10:11 am
Fri May 9, 2014

What's Your Major? 4 Decades Of College Degrees, In 1 Graph

Quoctrung Bui/NPR

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 10:28 am

In honor of college graduation season, we made a graph. It answers a few questions we had: What is the mix of bachelor's degrees awarded today, and how has the mix changed over the past several decades?

Hover over the graph to see how the popularity of each category changes over time. Click or tap to see a category individually.

A few notes:

Read more
The Record
3:56 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Well Into Spring, 'Frozen' Soundtrack Keeps The Charts Cool

Singer Idina Menzel (center) and Frozen songwriters Bobby Lopez (left) and Kristen Anderson-Lopez pose with gold records in February. Since then, the movie's soundtrack has sold over 1.5 million more copies.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images for Disney

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:26 pm

Disney's animated film Frozen has been racking up impressive statistics since it was released last November. Its box office earnings total $1 billion, worldwide, the movie won two Academy Awards, and on the first day the home video came out, it sold 3.2 million copies. But one stat has taken both Disney and industry analysts by surprise: The soundtrack has become a phenomenon, topping the Billboard 200 chart 13 times.

Read more
Business
6:13 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Drug Industry Moves To Cut Costs, Banks On Future Big Sellers

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 6:32 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
War On Poverty, 50 Years Later
5:11 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

One Family's Story Shows How The Cycle Of Poverty Is Hard To Break

Desiree Metcalf, here with one of her three daughters, is one of many poor Americans who find themselves trapped in a system meant to help.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 9:59 am

Desiree Metcalf's story is heartbreaking, but among the 46 million Americans who are poor today, her story is not unique.

Metcalf is 24 years old.

She's the mother of three little girls — ages 6, 4 and 2. They all have different fathers.

"That about sums me up, I think," she says.

Read more
The Salt
4:37 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

For Many, Farming Is A Labor Of Love, Not A Living

Miller with one of his cows.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 9:59 am

Every five years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture carries out a census of farmers: who they are, and what they are doing on their farms.

The agency just released the latest one, and it's a feast for all ag geeks. And here's the very first, most basic piece of new information: There are 2,109,303 farmers in this country.

But look a little closer at that number, and you can see that it's not quite what it seems. Most of those farmers are not actually making a living by farming.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:07 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Reported $147 Million Home Price Would Set New U.S. Record

A satellite image depicts a beachfront estate that reportedly sold for $147 million in East Hampton, N.Y.
Google Maps

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 4:12 pm

The stock market has been on a winning streak — and that means these are busy times in exclusive U.S. housing markets. How else to explain three homes that each reportedly sold for more than $100 million in the past three months?

News that hedge fund founder Barry Rosenstein is buying an East Hampton, N.Y., property for $147 million prompted Bloomberg News to declare, "The U.S. trophy-home market is shattering price records this year."

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:41 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Employers Eye Moving Sickest Workers To Insurance Exchanges

Would he be happier with a health plan bought on the exchange? His boss probably would be.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 12:40 pm

Can corporations shift workers with high medical costs from the company health plan into online insurance exchanges created by the Affordable Care Act? Some employers are considering it, say benefits consultants.

"It's all over the marketplace," said Todd Yates, a managing partner at Hill, Chesson & Woody, a North Carolina benefits consulting firm. "Employers are inquiring about it, and brokers and consultants are advocating for it."

Read more
Business
6:14 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Nigeria's Economy Leads Other African Nations

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 10:27 am

Steve Inskeep talks to Matthew Bishop, New York bureau chief at The Economist, about Nigeria's economy. The biggest country in Africa has also just become the continent's largest economy.

War On Poverty, 50 Years Later
3:34 am
Wed May 7, 2014

The Changing Picture Of Poverty: Hard Work Is 'Just Not Enough'

Victoria Houser of Painted Post, N.Y., is raising her son, Brayden, on her own. She says she feels stuck in a never-ending cycle, constantly worried that one financial emergency will send everything tumbling down.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 5:27 pm

There are 46 million poor people in the U.S., and millions more hover right above the poverty line — but go into many of their homes, and you might find a flat-screen TV, a computer or the latest sneakers.

And that raises a question: What does it mean to be poor in America today?

Read more
The Two-Way
5:35 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

China's Alibaba Files To Go Public In The U.S.

Alibaba founder Jack Ma dresses as a pop star and sings at an event to mark the 10th anniversary of China's most popular online shopping destination Taobao Marketplace, in Hangzhou on May 10, 2013.
Peter Parks AFP/Getty Images

The Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba has filed for an initial public offering in the United States.

The company runs the largest online and mobile commerce site in the world, controlling a huge portion of the Chinese market. Its intent to go public marks the biggest IPO of the Internet age since Twitter went public in November of 2013.

Read more
Your Money
11:51 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Is Bitcoin Where The Smart Money Is Now?

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 1:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we'd like to turn to matters of personal finance. It turns out that money is more than what you have in your pocket. Today we want to take a look at the digital currency known as bitcoin.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:04 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Bayer Will Buy Merck Consumer Unit For $14.2 Billion

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 5:44 pm

German drug company Bayer has agreed to acquire the consumer care business of U.S.-based Merck & Co., in a deal that would bolster Bayer in the over-the-counter drug sector. The $14.2 billion purchase includes brands such as Claritin, Coppertone and Dr. Scholl's.

From Reuters:

Read more
The Two-Way
8:55 am
Tue May 6, 2014

New Report Finds Climate Change Already Having Broad Impact

People survey the damage on Scenic Highway in Pensacola, Fla., after part of it collapsed following heavy rains and flash flooding on April 30.
Marianna Massey Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 11:22 am

A new U.S. government report released Tuesday finds that climate change is already having a broad impact on both weather and the economy.

NPR's Elizabeth Shogren tells our Newscast unit the third National Climate Assessment is the most comprehensive look at climate change that the government has ever produced. It was put together by more than 300 experts "guided by a 60-member Federal Advisory Committee."

She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Read more
The Two-Way
6:03 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Poll: Prestigious Colleges Won't Make You Happier In Life Or Work

Harvard's Hasty Pudding Theatricals. According to a recent Gallup poll, only 2 percent of college graduates with $20,000 to $40,000 in undergraduate loans said they were "thriving."
TPapi Flickr

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 9:38 am

There's plenty of anxiety in the U.S. over getting into a top college. But a new Gallup poll suggests that, later in life, it doesn't matter nearly as much as we think. In fact, when you ask college graduates whether they're "engaged" with their work or "thriving" in all aspects of their lives, their responses don't vary one bit whether they went to a prestigious college or not.

Read more
Business
4:59 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Fiat Chrysler To Outline 5-Year Strategic Plan

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's a big day for Fiat Chrysler. The Italian-American automaker will outline a strategic plan for the next five years.

The marriage between two once troubled companies, Chrysler and Fiat, has surprised many in the auto industry by thriving - not just surviving. Now, the company is looking to build on its strengths, as Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports.

Read more
Business
4:02 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Target's Top Executive Steps Down, Brought Low By Data Breach

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 11:49 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Five months after Target disclosed a massive data breach, its CEO has lost his job. Greg Steinhafel is stepping down from his dual posts as president and CEO at Target Corporation. His resignation underscores the company's effort to overhaul its entire business. Here's NPR's Yuki Noguchi.

Read more
Remembrances
4:02 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Remembering Economist Gary Becker, Who Described 'Marriage Market'

Gary Becker was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom at the White House in 2007.
Roger L. Wollenberg UPI/Landov

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 7:59 pm

University of Chicago economist Gary Becker died Saturday at the age of 83. He won the Nobel Prize in 1992 for broadening the horizons of economics, using economic analysis to explore social issues like crime, racial discrimination and drug addiction.

Becker was a giant in the field of economics, and his pioneering application of economic theory to social questions extended to the marriage market. In an NPR interview on the day he was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics, Becker explained:

Read more
Planet Money
11:48 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Most Americans Make It To The Top 20 Percent (At Least For A While)

promo
Quoctrung Bui/NPR

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 3:07 pm

We often talk about income as if it's this fixed thing. Those people over there are the 1 percent. These over here live in poverty. That other group is the people in the top 20 percent. That's not the way it is.

While economic mobility hasn't increased in this country over the past few decades, there is still churn. Lots of people move up and down the income ladder over the course of a career.

Read more
Business
5:36 am
Mon May 5, 2014

David Weil To Begin Serving As First Wage And Hour Administrator

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 7:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A Boston University economist will become the nation's Wage and Hour administrator when he's sworn in today. David Weil will enforce laws, like the minimum wage and the 40-hour week. Even though Weil is a business professor, some business interests are expressing concern about his appointment.

Here's Chip Mitchell of member station WBEZ.

Read more

Pages