Business

TED Radio Hour
8:44 am
Fri February 6, 2015

How Should We Distribute Our Wealth?

Nick Hanauer says increasing the minimum wage would be good for the poor and the super rich.
Ryan Lash TED

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 4:50 pm

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Seven Deadly Sins

About Nick Hanauer's TED Talk

Nick Hanauer is a rich guy with several houses, but is he greedy? He argues that an increase in minimum wage would be good for everyone.

About Nick Hanauer

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Planet Money
5:25 am
Fri February 6, 2015

Federally Regulated Banks Begin To Work With States' Pot Businesses

Originally published on Wed February 11, 2015 1:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We've been hearing a lot about how hard it is to do banking when the business is selling marijuana.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Even though in 23 states, medicinal marijuana is legal.

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NPR Story
5:02 am
Fri February 6, 2015

Economists Expect Data To Show A Pullback In Job Creation

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 11:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Parallels
6:23 pm
Thu February 5, 2015

In 'Red Notice,' Success Draws Treachery, Tragedy In Putin's Russia

Bill Browder crosses Red Square in 2004, at the height of Hermitage Capital Management's success.
James Hill Courtesy of the Browder Family Archives

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 11:48 am

William Browder's new book, Red Notice, is named for the type of warrant the Russian government has sought from Interpol in hopes of capturing him.

The hedge fund manager made huge profits with Hermitage Capital Management, a company he started in Russia in 1996. That, he says, drew the attention and machinations of a corrupt group of Russian officials.

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Business
6:23 pm
Thu February 5, 2015

Planning Through Oil Booms Helps Small Producers Weather The Busts

Tracy Perryman is production manager for his family's small oil company in Luling, Texas. B.J.P. Inc. owns 116 wells that, combined, produce about 100 barrels a day.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 10:55 am

Hard times have hit the oil fields. A barrel of West Texas Intermediate crude has dropped from a high of over $100 to less than $50. But Tracy Perryman, a small oilman in Luling, Texas, has learned how to survive the lean times.

Oil companies that take on a lot of debt sometimes don't survive the downturns. But veterans of oil busts have learned how to plan for the inevitable price plunges.

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Planet Money
5:20 pm
Thu February 5, 2015

Map: The Most Common* Job In Every State

Quoctrung Bui/NPR

*We used data from the Census Bureau, which has two catch-all categories: "managers not elsewhere classified" and "salespersons not elsewhere classified." Because those categories are broad and vague to the point of meaninglessness, we excluded them from our map.

What's with all the truck drivers? Truck drivers dominate the map for a few reasons.

  • Driving a truck has been immune to two of the biggest trends affecting U.S. jobs: globalization and automation. A worker in China can't drive a truck in Ohio, and machines can't drive cars (yet).
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Planet Money
4:35 pm
Thu February 5, 2015

How Corruption Affects The Time It Takes To Do Business

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 6:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
4:18 am
Thu February 5, 2015

Stuck In Traffic? It's Likely To Be Worse In 30 Years, Report Says

Traffic clogs the 101 Freeway in Los Angeles.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 1:27 pm

Moving from crisis to crisis — for too long that's been America's strategy for dealing with the challenges of an aging transit infrastructure, from roads to bridges to ports. The result is a system that's crumbling and in desperate need of attention, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Transportation. The massive study both looks at the current state of the country's transportation systems and forecasts the challenges that lie ahead.

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The Two-Way
7:51 am
Wed February 4, 2015

Staples Says It's Buying Office Depot For $6.3 Billion

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 10:52 am

Nearly 20 years after an earlier proposed merger was rejected by U.S. regulators, Staples says it is acquiring Office Depot for $6.3 billion. Combined, the two office supply giants would have annual sales of some $39 billion.

"Staples began discussions to acquire Office Depot in September 2014," the companies said in a news release. "The agreement has been unanimously approved by each company's Board of Directors."

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Energy
5:12 am
Wed February 4, 2015

Keystone XL Pipeline Benefits U.S. And Canada, Alberta Premier Says

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 7:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Your Money
6:09 pm
Tue February 3, 2015

Looking For Even Cheaper Gas? Go Generic At An Indie Station

Traffic moves along Route 21 in downtown Newark, N.J., where a gas station lists the price for regular unleaded gasoline at $1.72.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Tue February 10, 2015 2:44 pm

By now, the surprise of cheap gas has probably worn off.

But drivers on the hunt for the very best prices have noticed a new trend: Small, independent gas stations are often the first to cut prices when the price of crude oil falls. This has a lot to do with how gas is bought, sold and moved from pipeline to pump.

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Law
12:27 pm
Tue February 3, 2015

Justice Dept. Settles S&P Lawsuit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
8:55 am
Tue February 3, 2015

S&P Pays Nearly $1.38B To Settle Mortgage Crisis Claims

Originally published on Tue February 3, 2015 11:34 am

Financial ratings service Standard & Poor's will pay almost $1.38 billion to settle charges that it took part in a scheme in which investors lost billions of dollars after putting money into securities whose credit ratings didn't reflect their true risk.

Under the settlement, S&P parent company McGraw Hill Financial will make two payments of $687.5 million: one to the U.S. Justice Department and another that's divided among 19 states and the District of Columbia.

McGraw Hill says it will also pay $125 million to the California Public Employees' Retirement System.

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Politics
6:13 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Budget Sent To Congress Values Middle-Class Economics

Originally published on Tue February 3, 2015 10:28 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
5:17 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Wis. Budget Proposal Reignites Debate Over Private, Public Sector

Originally published on Tue February 3, 2015 12:27 pm

Copyright 2015 Wisconsin Public Radio. To see more, visit http://wpr.org/.

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Business
4:59 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Budget Proposal Calls For Billions In New Government Spending

Originally published on Tue February 3, 2015 12:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Economy
4:59 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Workers Should Be Prepared To Start Over In New Jobs, Stats Show

Originally published on Tue February 3, 2015 12:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Business
3:59 am
Tue February 3, 2015

With Oil Prices So Low, What's That Fuel Surcharge For, Exactly?

The price of jet fuel has dropped, but airlines are still adding fuel surcharges to the price of many tickets. Many other industries that use large amounts of fuel, like shipping and delivery services, have also maintained extra fuel fees.
Nam Y. Huh AP

Originally published on Tue February 3, 2015 12:27 pm

When oil prices shot up a few years ago, many transportation and delivery businesses started adding fuel surcharges to their prices.

Now, fuel prices are plunging, but lots of those surcharges still linger, and consumer advocates are crying foul.

The drop in the cost of oil is a huge factor in the airline industry, where 30 percent of all expenses are for fuel. But airlines, along with other industries with large fuel expenses, have been slow to respond with lower prices.

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New Boom
6:19 pm
Mon February 2, 2015

Economists Say Millennials Should Consider Careers In Trades

Jeffy Docteur is one of the students in the NStar electrician apprenticeship program outside Boston. He says he's interested in working on switching systems that keep power flowing through the electrical grid.
Chris Arnold NPR

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 11:39 am

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

As the economy continues to recover, economists are seeing stark differences between people with high school and college degrees. The unemployment rate is nearly twice as high for Americans with a high school diploma as for those with a four-year college degree or more.

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The Two-Way
4:56 pm
Mon February 2, 2015

Detroit Man Who Commutes 21 Miles A Day On Foot Will Get A Hand

James Robertson, 56, walks to catch a bus in Detroit last month. The bus won't take him all the way to his job in Rochester Hills, so he has to walk the last eight miles.
Ryan Garza Detroit Free Press/TNS/Landov

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 7:29 pm

In many U.S. cities, a 21-mile round-trip commute can take a long time, but imagine if you had to make the journey on foot. The Detroit Free Press says that's exactly what James Robertson does every workday.

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Politics
4:17 pm
Mon February 2, 2015

Gov. Scott Walker Eyes 2016, But Can He Get Past Labor's Loathing?

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker spoke about taking on public employee unions, and the protests that followed, at a recent candidates forum in Iowa. He said what people may not know is that protesters — as many as 1,000 of them — showed up outside his home while his family was there. He says he also received death threats.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 6:30 pm

There is not a lot of love between the U.S. labor movement and those on the long list of potential 2016 Republican presidential hopefuls. But there is one name among the GOP prospects that labor truly despises — and fears. He is Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who weakened unions in his own state and appears ready to make his battles with labor a centerpiece of a bid for the White House.

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Politics
4:15 pm
Mon February 2, 2015

A Look At What's Inside Obama's Budget Proposal

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 6:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
4:15 pm
Mon February 2, 2015

Cash Is Definitely Not King For Card-Carrying Swedes

Nina Galata displays her smartphone equipped with a card reader to accept donations and payment for Situation Stockholm, a magazine sold by Stockholm's homeless.
Jonas Ekstromer TT/AFP/Getty

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 3:22 pm

Peter Fredell carries an unusual wallet. It feels a bit like leather, but the material is pale and thin. He pulls it out on a street corner in Stockholm.

"I actually made it myself," he says. "It's an eel that I fished up. And I used the skin and stitched it together."

This eelskin wallet carries personal significance — but it does not carry cash.

Around the world, cash is fading. Electronic transactions are becoming a bigger part of the economy every year. And one of the leaders in this trend is Sweden, where more than 95 percent of transactions are digital.

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Politics
7:38 am
Mon February 2, 2015

Obama To Send Nearly $4 Trillion Budget To Congress

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 8:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Education
5:48 pm
Sun February 1, 2015

University Endowments Reached Record Levels In 2014

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 1:33 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

The annual ranking of college fundraising is out, and it's a shocker. The Council for Aid to Education found a massive upswing in money going to big universities last year. Stacy Palmer writes for the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

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Author Interviews
7:57 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Are Danes Really That Happy? The Myth Of The Scandinavian Utopia

A view of Oslo, Norway, taken from the surrounding hills. Author Michael Booth says Norwegians were traditionally thought of as Scandinavia's "country bumpkin."
Lise Aaserud AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 11:03 am

What comes to mind when you think of Scandinavia? Great education systems? The world's happiest people? Healthy work-life balance?

One man, a British transplant living in Denmark, sought to set the record straight about his adoptive homeland.

Michael Booth is the author of The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia. He tells NPR's Rachel Martin about how culturally different Scandinavian countries really are.

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The Two-Way
9:03 am
Sat January 31, 2015

Merkel: No Relaxing Of Terms On Greek Debt

German Chancellor Angela Merkel stands in front of a poster showing a new two-euro commemorative coin at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany, on Thursday.
Britta Pedersen DPA/Landov

Originally published on Sat January 31, 2015 4:49 pm

Updated at 11:00 a.m. ET

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has rejected any renegotiation of Greek debt after last week's election that brought an anti-austerity party into power in Athens.

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Politics
5:55 pm
Fri January 30, 2015

Republican Gov. Rick Snyder Turns To Voters To Approve Tax Increase

Originally published on Fri January 30, 2015 6:29 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Ed
7:08 am
Fri January 30, 2015

True Or False? Free And Reduced-Price Lunch = Poor

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri January 30, 2015 4:58 pm

In the education world, you see this phrase all the time: "free and reduced-price lunch." What's the percentage at a given school? In a given district or state?

It's not necessarily out of concern about who's getting fed. Instead, it's most often used to talk about concentrations of poverty and how that affects learning.

The phrase refers to students enrolled in the National School Lunch Program — an easily available data point for any school and any district.

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Planet Money
5:17 am
Fri January 30, 2015

Winning At Short Selling May Not Be A Reason To Celebrate

Originally published on Fri January 30, 2015 7:46 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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