Business

Around the Nation
3:01 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Growing An Urban Neighborhood, One Store At A Time

Communications store owner Donny Seto (right) says other business owners shouldn't be so hesitant to set up in the Congress Heights neighborhood of Washington, D.C.
Leah Binkovitz NPR

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 11:30 am

Across the country, communities stranded in food and retail deserts are asking how they can enjoy the bounty afforded to other urban centers. One Washington, D.C., community thinks it might have an answer.

Just a 10-minute drive south of the U.S. Capitol, across the Anacostia River, sits Congress Heights. The Southeast D.C. neighborhood is less than 2 miles long and home to more than 8,000 people, many in single-family houses. But if you're looking for a sit-down meal, options are scarce.

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Race
6:01 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

My Brother's Keeper In The Community: Hopes And Aims At Ground Level

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 8:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now a view of the president's national initiative from a man whose long worked with young men of color at the local level, Malik Washington. He's acting executive director of the William Killebrew Foundation based here in Washington, D.C.

Welcome to the program.

MALIK WASHINGTON: Thank you, Audie.

CORNISH: So tell us what your organization does.

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Race
4:35 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Before Obama's New Initiative Stands A Landscape Of Hard Numbers

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 8:42 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

We're going to spend the next few minutes talking about a new initiative unveiled recently by President Obama. It's called My Brother's Keeper. The goal, in the words of the White House, is to help every boy and young man of color who is willing to do the hard work to get ahead. But the challenges are great. Here's President Obama.

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All Tech Considered
4:35 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Post A Survey On Mechanical Turk And Watch The Results Roll In

Researchers are paying people pennies to take their surveys on MechanicalTurk.com, an Amazon site.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 8:42 pm

You can buy just about anything on Amazon.com — clothes, books, electronics. You can buy answers, too. College students and professors are doing all sorts of research on an Amazon site called Mechanical Turk.

Need 200 smokers for your survey on lung cancer? Have a moral dilemma to pose for your paper on Kierkegaard? Now researchers can log in, offer a few pennies in payment and watch the data roll in.

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Parallels
12:24 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Sanctions On Russia: Why The Europeans May Say Nyet

Ties between Russia and Europe are more than just gas.
Sergei Karpukhin AP

Russia's seizure of Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula brought with it threats of U.S. sanctions, but Europe, while condemning President Vladimir Putin's actions, has been more circumspect. Part of the reason: Europe's dependence on Russian money and energy.

"It is a matter of simple economics," Alex Melikishvili, senior Europe/CIS Analyst at IHS Country Risk, said in an email.

He noted that the EU is Russia's main trade partner; bilateral trade is in hundreds of billion of dollars annually, in contrast with much lower U.S.-Russia trade (see chart).

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The Salt
11:53 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Chipotle Says There's No 'Guacapocalypse' Looming

An employee prepares to make fresh guacamole at a Chipotle restaurant in Hollywood, Calif.
Patrick T. Fallon Bloomberg

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 3:16 pm

Looks like reports of a looming "guacapocalypse" have been vastly overstated.

This morning, guacamole lovers woke to headlines warning that Mexican fast-food chain Chipotle could eventually be forced to drop the dip from its menu, if changing global weather patterns continue to drive volatility in the price of avocados.

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Politics
11:38 am
Wed March 5, 2014

A Fighting Chance For Obama's Proposed Military Cuts?

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 4:00 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
8:58 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Job Growth Was Weak Again In February, ADP Survey Shows

The scene at a job fair last year in Emeryville, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Private employers added only 139,000 jobs to their payrolls in February and job growth in January was even less than previously thought, according to the latest ADP National Employment Report.

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Business
7:46 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Obama's Budget: Magic Wand Or Club?

President Barack Obama delivers remarks on his 2015 budget plan Tuesday at Powell Elementary School in Washington.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 11:02 am

Think of the budget plan released Tuesday by President Obama as a magic wand. If he could wave it and make every line come true, how would the U.S. economy look?

Like this:

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All Tech Considered
3:07 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Technology May Turn You Into A Bigger Tipper

Figuring out how much to tip, and when, is a delicate science. Some businesses are integrating technology into how you pay to encourage you to tip more.
Dan Bobkoff NPR

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 2:24 pm

You're probably used to rounding up the total on your taxi ride or dropping a buck in a jar at the coffee shop. Now, new high-tech ways to pay nudge you to tip more generously and more often.

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The Two-Way
5:58 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Teen Sues Parents, Claiming They Owe Her Money For College

Rachel Canning (right) sits with her friend Jaime Inglesino during a hearing Tuesday at the Morris County Courthouse in New Jersey.
John O'Boyle AP

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:56 am

A judge held an unusual hearing in New Jersey on Tuesday: a lawsuit brought by an 18-year-old who says her parents kicked her out of their house. Rachel Canning is seeking to force her parents to give her financial support and money for college, in addition to pay for tuition at her private school.

Superior Court Family Division Judge Peter Bogaard, who heard the case in Morristown, N.J., on Tuesday afternoon, denied Canning's requests in what's seen as the first round of hearings in the case.

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Economy
5:29 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Severe Weather Socks The Economy, But Full Impact Is Unclear

It's too cold to eat out.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 6:31 pm

The economy often absorbs the impact of snowstorms, such as this week's storm, without much trouble, but this winter the weather is doing more damage than usual.

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Economy
4:51 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Chinese Investors Aren't Snatching Up Detroit Property, Yet

Foreign investors are taking an interest in low real estate prices in Detroit. But these investors aren't buying up land at the rate that some media reports have indicated.
Mira Oberman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 12:27 pm

After Detroit filed for bankruptcy protection last summer, the media was flooded with stories about Chinese investors pouring money into real estate there. Headlines like this one summed it up: "Chinese investors are buying up Detroit."

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Europe
4:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Why Is The Ukrainian Economy Such A Mess?

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 6:31 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Among the delegations heading to Kiev this week, a team from the International Monetary Fund. Its task: to come up with a plan to help Ukraine's ailing economy. And Ukraine's interim government says it needs a lot of help. There are fears it will default on its debt. And that government pensions and state salaries could soon go unpaid.

Joining us is Anders Asland, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Welcome to the program.

ANDERS ASLAND: Thank you.

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Europe
4:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Deep Ties Between Russia And The West Make Sanctions Risky

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 6:31 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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Your Money
12:02 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Tax Deductions: Putting More Money In Your Pocket

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 2:16 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Politics
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

At The White House, It's Budget Day

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

President Obama unveils his nearly $4 trillion budget at an elementary school. But before the bound copy of the budget is even delivered to Congress, the fate of this spending plan is already sealed.

The Salt
3:48 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Europe Tells U.S. To Lay Off Brie And Get Its Own Cheese Names

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 9:19 am

What's in a name? It's an age-old question Juliet once asked Romeo in Shakespeare's famed play.

Today, it's a serious question between the U.S. and the European Union, which has said it wants U.S. food makers to stop using European names.

But depending on what food you're talking about, a name could be a lot, says Kyle Cherek, the producer and host of a TV show called Wisconsin Foodie.

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Business
3:35 am
Mon March 3, 2014

E-Cigarette Critics Worry New Ads Will Make 'Vaping' Cool For Kids

E-cigarettes was a $2 billion industry last year and it's expected to hit $5 billion this year.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 5:30 pm

Electronic cigarette makers are getting bold with their advertising, using provocative new print ads and celebrity endorsements on TV. But public health advocates say these images are luring kids to hook them on nicotine.

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The Salt
5:12 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

Even In A Desert, Drought Spells Trouble For Ranchers

No snowpack, no hay: In the northern Nevada, cattle feed is getting hard to come by, as sources of water diminish in supply.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 7:09 pm

In northern Nevada, a place famous for its wide, open spaces and expansive cattle operations, ranchers are in a bind due to the historic drought.

Much of the state is desert, so when people talk about drought, they're really talking about the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada. It's at barely 20 percent of average.

This is a huge concern for farmers and ranchers like Julie Wolf, because the mountains store the snow that melts and feeds rivers and reservoirs. These bodies of water then allow the desert to bloom with grass and alfalfa for her cattle.

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Economy
7:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

With Housing Recovery, Mortgage-Market Jobs Dip

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 2:24 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

JP Morgan Chase announced this past week that it's going to lay off 8,000 people this year, most of them in the company's residential home loan business. Home sales are slowing nationwide and are now at their lowest point in 18 months. So, does that mean we headed for another housing swoon? Well, NPR's Chris Arnold says that things might be better than they appear.

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Business
5:26 am
Sun March 2, 2014

Marching Into Spring, Realtors' Hopes Rise

Economists say strong home sales this spring could drive job creation, as well as boost personal wealth and consumer confidence.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 12:07 pm

For real estate agents, March Madness has begun.

The rush is on to throw out clutter, paint walls and clean carpets. Historic data show the peak time for selling homes is April through July, and that means this is the month for spring cleaning.

"Freshen up the landscape and add that mulch now," Dallas Realtor Jeff Duffey recommended in a phone interview. "Get your over-sized furniture out of the small bedroom and put more lamps in that dark room."

The economy has a lot riding on how well people obey Duffey's marching orders.

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The Salt
1:20 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Why The 'Non-GMO' Label Is Organic's Frenemy

The increasingly successful movement to eliminate GMO crops from food is turning out to be organic's false friend.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 11:29 am

It's easy to think of "organic" and "non-GMO" as the best buddies of food. They sit comfortably beside each other in the same grocery stores — most prominently, in Whole Foods Market. Culturally, they also seem to occupy the same space. Both reject aspects of mainstream industrial agriculture.

In fact, the increasingly successful movement to eliminate genetically modified crops — GMOs — from food is turning out to be organic's false friend. The non-GMO label has become a cheaper alternative to organic.

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Race
12:00 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Will President's Initiative Be A 'Game-Changer' For Young Men Of Color?

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 12:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Economy Grew Less Than Thought As 2013 Came To A Close

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 10:32 am

The U.S. economy grew at a 2.4 percent annual rate in fourth-quarter 2013, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said Friday, as it significantly cut its estimate of how much gross domestic product grew during the last three months of the year.

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Economy
5:21 am
Fri February 28, 2014

CBO Assesses Affordable Care Act's Economic Effects

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 7:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Friday, this is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

The Affordable Care Act will change the way millions of Americans think about their jobs. That's essentially what the Congressional Budget Office has said in its assessment of the law's effect on the economy. They think the law will give some people the option to retire early and others the flexibility to work less.

As NPR's John Ydstie reports, this is already happening.

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All Tech Considered
3:30 am
Fri February 28, 2014

A Smartphone That Tries To Slip You Off The Grid

The Blackphone, an Android software-based mobile, encrypts texts, voice calls and video chats.
Albert Gea Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 10:24 am

Mike Janke used to be a Navy SEAL sniper. These days he's taking on the government and corporate America. He's the founder of Blackphone, an Android-based smartphone with privacy as its main selling point.

It's not NSA-proof — in that everything is hackable if you try hard enough. But Janke says it's taking on the entire mobile economy that lets law enforcement and companies in way too easily.

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The Two-Way
6:12 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Yellen Acknowledges Weaker Economic Data; Markets Rally

Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen gestures as she testifies during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing while delivering the Federal Reserves semiannual Monetary Policy Report on Capitol Hill Thursday.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Citing "softness" in the U.S. economy, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen told a Senate panel today that the Fed will try to determine if the results are a new trend or are related to this winter's intense cold and storms. Analysts are seeing her comments as signaling a potential shift in the "tapering" of the Fed's stimulus program.

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Around the Nation
5:46 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Telework: Not Just For Moms And Millennials

New research finds that 3 out of 4 remote workers are men.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 12:37 pm

Many people may think of a "remote worker" as a harried mom in her bathrobe or a 20-something at a coffee shop. But that image doesn't actually reflect who is working outside the office, according to a new study.

"A remote worker, someone who does most of their work outside of their employer's location, is not a woman, is not a parent and is not a Gen-Y millennial," says Cali Williams Yost, a workplace flexibility strategist and CEO of the Flex+Strategy Group.

A Remote-Working Gender Gap

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Business
4:07 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Wipe Off That Mustache, Milk's Got A New Slogan

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:57 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

If a food label doesn't move you to make a certain food choice, maybe a good marketing campaign can. For the dairy industry, the last couple of decades has meant lots of milk mustaches on celebrities from Britney Spears to Susan Sarandon, Harrison Ford to Shaquille O'Neal. The ad showing off the milk-framed pouts and smiles, also feature two words: got milk? Well, the slogan and the milk mustaches are drying up.

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