Business

Paying For College
3:55 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Changing The Face Of Astronomy Research

Students from CUNY's AstroCom NYC program meet for a weekly class at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Dennis Robbins, an associate professor of science education at CUNY's Hunter College, teaches Betsy Hernandez (from left), Jaquelin Erazo, Ariel Diaz and Mario Martin.
Beth Fertig WNYC

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:04 pm

Shooting for the stars is expensive.

Advanced sciences like astronomy require years of study and graduate degrees. And the soaring cost of college can be a heavy obstacle for low-income and minority students hoping to break into those fields.

A program at the City University of New York hopes to lift that burden by providing scholarships and one-on-one mentoring to underrepresented students.

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Politics
3:54 am
Wed April 2, 2014

In Arkansas, Voters May Get Chance To Raise Minimum Wage

Arkansas Sen. Mark Pryor speaks to reporters at his Little Rock campaign headquarters on Feb. 28. A minimum wage increase on the ballot alongside Pryor could give Democrats more of a reason to show up on Election Day.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:04 pm

President Obama travels to Michigan Wednesday to tout his proposal to boost the minimum wage.

Raising the wage to $10.10 an hour is one of the top agenda items for Obama and his fellow Democrats during this mid-term election year. The White House says the move would put more money in the pockets of some 28 million workers.

One test of that strategy will be in Arkansas, where proponents are trying to put a minimum wage increase on the ballot in November. Arkansas has some of the lowest wages in the country and it's also home to one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats.

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The Two-Way
6:13 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Mother Of Victim: More Killed By GM Ignition Switch Defect

Laura Christian, far right, talks about how her birth daughter Amber Marie Rose was killed on July 29, 2005, in a car crash that investigators determined was linked to a defective ignition switch.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 7:24 pm

The birth mother of Amber Marie Rose, the teen whose 2005 death was the first linked to an ignition switch problem that's triggered a massive recall of General Motors vehicles, says that through a Facebook group for families of victims, she's identified at least 29 fatalities due to the defect. GM only acknowledges 13 deaths.

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Planet Money
4:38 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

More House, Less Booze: How Spending Changes From Age 25 To 75

What is it about bars that brings out bad behavior?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 12:34 pm

As anyone who has been 25 and not 25 can tell you, spending patterns change over the course of adult life.

We built the graph below to track these changes. It shows how different categories of spending change between age 25 and 75. For each category, spending at age 25 is equal to 1 on the graph.

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Health Care
4:30 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Beyond The Fog Of Spin And Doubt: What Has ACA Achieved?

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 7:58 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block in Dallas.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel in Washington, where President Obama cheered the Affordable Care Act today.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Despite several lost weeks out of the gate because of problems with the website, 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private insurance plans through these marketplaces.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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The Two-Way
3:59 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Senate Democrats Say Caterpillar Avoided $2.4 Billion In Taxes

Caterpillar Inc Vice President for Finance Services Julie Lagacy is flanked by former Senior International Tax Manager Rodney Perkins (left) and Chief Tax Officer Robin Beran (right) as they are sworn in to testify on Tuesday.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 4:31 pm

At a Senate committee hearing on Tuesday, senior officials of Peoria, Ill.-based Caterpillar Inc. defended the company against accusations that it had used an affiliate in Switzerland to avoided paying some $2.4 billion in taxes over a 12-year period.

"Americans pay the taxes they owe and not more. And, as an American company, we pay the taxes we owe, not more," Julie Lagacy, vice president of financial services at Caterpillar, told a Senate panel on Tuesday.

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Author Interviews
2:00 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

On A 'Rigged' Wall Street, Milliseconds Make All The Difference

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:01 pm

"The stock market is rigged," Michael Lewis tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "It's rigged for the benefit for really a handful of insiders. It's rigged to ... maximize the take of Wall Street, of banks, the exchanges and the high-frequency traders at the expense of ordinary investors."

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The Two-Way
1:39 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

GM CEO Barra Is Grilled Over Handling Of Ignition Switch Defect

As members of Congress prepared to hear testimony from GM's CEO Tuesday, Ken and Jayne Rimer, whose daughter, Natasha Weigel, died in the crash of a 2005 Chevy Cobalt, spoke at a news conference held by family members of deceased drivers.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 6:15 pm

In a hearing before the House Oversight and Investigations panel, GM CEO Mary Barra and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Acting Administrator David Friedman testify Tuesday on concerns surrounding GM's recall of a faulty ignition switch that's been linked to more than a dozen deaths.

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Business
6:13 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Big Thinkers Discuss How To Prevent Next Financial Crisis

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 8:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

People who think big thoughts about the financial system gathered in Boston yesterday. They were asking how to prevent the next financial crisis.

NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

CHRIS ARNOLD, BYLINE: Speaking to a room full of bankers and regulators, former Senator Chris Dodd took people back to a moment in 2008. Lehman Brothers had just collapsed and he was called into a small emergency meeting with other top lawmakers and Fed Chair Ben Bernanke.

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Business
6:08 am
Tue April 1, 2014

It's Illegal But People Get Fired For Talking About Their Pay

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 8:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

The U.S. Senate today will debate why women still earn roughly 80 cents to a man's dollar. Equal pay is a goal of the Paycheck Fairness Act. As NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports, one part of the bill would ban workplace policies that keep everyone's pay secret.

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All Tech Considered
3:19 am
Tue April 1, 2014

This Tax Season, Fraudsters May Target Your Refund

Fraudsters can get a lot of data by hacking payroll systems.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 9:47 am

You've already heard about thieves stealing credit card numbers, with the Target stores theft dominating the news headlines. But imagine what a thief could do with your company's payroll records. Those contain valuable information such as your Social Security number, date of birth, your address and how much you earn.

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Business
3:08 am
Tue April 1, 2014

An Intern At 40-Something, And 'Paid In Hugs'

Danielle Probst, 50, works part-time in food service at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Previously, she worked in film and marketing and also had an internship at a social media marketing company.
Jim Tuttle NPR

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 11:43 am

As the job market improves and people are trying to get back to work, more older workers in their 40s and 50s are signing on for internships. It could pay off, but it can come with some difficult trade-offs.

For Renee Killian, 47, it has meant working an unpaid stint alongside fellow interns who are less than half her age. Killian's dayside duties at the Red Cross in Washington, D.C., often involve making sure the response trucks are properly stocked with blankets, water bottles and cleaning kits. At night, she is a volunteer on call. And she's not earning a dime.

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Code Switch
3:05 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Lending Circles Help Latinas Pay Bills And Invest

Alicia Villanueva gives change to a customer at Off the Grid, a weekly street-food market in San Francisco.
Sarah Peet Sarah Peet Photography

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 8:50 am

As part of its Changing Lives of Women series, Morning Edition is exploring women and their relationship with money: saving, purchasing and investing for themselves and their families.

Cuban-American Barb Mayo describes a tanda like this: "It's like a no-interest loan with your friends." Mayo had never heard of tandas growing up, and it wasn't until she started working in sales for a cable company in Southern California that she was introduced to the concept.

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News
4:37 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

Is The Latest Climate Report Too Much Of A Downer?

According to a new report, unless more is done to combat climate change, extreme weather like the drought now gripping California will only grow more common.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 12:08 pm

Reading through the latest report from the U.N.-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), it's hard not to feel despondent about the state of the world.

The report's colorful charts and tables tell of droughts and fires; depleted fisheries and strained cropland; a world in which heat-related disease is on the rise and freshwater is growing scarce.

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The Two-Way
12:56 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

Stocks Rise After Fed's Yellen Says Economy's Not So Hot

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen speaking Monday in Chicago.
John Gress Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 2:01 pm

Just under two weeks ago, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen emerged from her first meeting as head of the central bank's policymaking committee to talk to reporters.

Stocks fell.

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Business
6:15 am
Mon March 31, 2014

David Crisp To Be Sentenced In Massive Mortgage Fraud Case

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 7:55 am

Steve Inskeep talks to Gary Silverman of the Financial Times about a real estate fraud scheme that helped make Bakersfield, Calif., one of the home foreclosure capitals of the country.

The Changing Lives Of Women
3:28 am
Mon March 31, 2014

When Planning For The Future, Women Have Been Hands Off

In Blue Jasmine, Cate Blanchett plays a wealthy New York socialite who has it all, loses it all and ends up delusional on a park bench.
Perdido Productions

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 12:46 pm

It's a truism in the financial industry that women need to get more out of their money than men since they live longer and make less, especially if they take time out to care for children or aging parents. But it's also a given that they lack confidence when it comes to investing, something that's clear on a recent evening at the Women's Center in Vienna, Va.

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Your Money
3:14 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Stocks Or The Mattress? Winning The Retirement Championship

iStockphoto

This month, millions of Americans picked winners and losers in college basketball games, hoping to make money from wise bets.

But you can play for much higher stakes by placing sensible bets with your savings. If you wager well, you can have a much more comfortable retirement.

Economists, though, are making forecasts that make it tough to guess which way growth is going.

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Business
5:15 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Ford Investment In Ohio Plants Boosts Midwest Car Manufacturing

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 12:12 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an engine for job growth.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Yeah. That's a joke. But it's also true. Ford Motor Company says it is investing more than half a billion dollars in upgrading an Ohio engine plant. Earlier this month, the company announced it is shifting production of some truck models to the Buckeye State from Mexico. And today, Ford says it will create 300 jobs more in Ohio.

Nick Castele, of member station WCPN, reports.

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Planet Money
3:26 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Comparing Law School Rankings? Read The Fine Print

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 12:12 pm

When students go to law school, they make a bunch of calculations. A big one is cost: top schools charge more than $50,000 a year, and graduate-student debt is on the rise. Another key calculation: The likelihood of getting a good job after graduation.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
3:24 am
Fri March 28, 2014

IMF's Lagarde: Women In Workforce Key To Healthy Economies

International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde in Brussels earlier this year. Lagarde says women are underutilized in the global economy.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 12:12 pm

As the first woman to lead the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde is among an elite group of people determining how money is saved, spent and invested worldwide.

It's not the first time she's been a "first." Lagarde was France's first female finance minister, and before that, the first woman to chair the global law firm Baker & McKenzie.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
6:31 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Women And Wealth: Local To Global Money Lessons

Our Women and Wealth series will involve you, too. We're asking women to share their best lessons about earning, saving, investing or using money. The above quote comes from Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn. You can see more from her, and other influential women, and add your two cents at our Tumblr, She Works Her Money.
NPR

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:39 pm

When it comes to money, women rule. Literally.

Think about it: A woman holds the top job at the Federal Reserve, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Office of Management and Budget, and the Social Security Administration.

At the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde is the managing director.

These women run large, complex organizations that decide how money is invested, budgeted, saved and spent. They shape the rules that govern the global economy.

But over on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley, men still do more risk-taking.

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Europe
4:12 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

IMF Bailout Comes With A Hefty Side Of Pain For Ukrainians

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Read more
Economy
11:52 am
Thu March 27, 2014

What Raising Tipped Workers' Wages Could Mean For Economy

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 12:59 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. The minimum wage debate is in the news again. President Obama and other Democrats have been pushing for an increase as part of a broader conversation about economic fairness. But if you've ever been a caddy on the golf course, a server at a restaurant or anybody else who's depending on tips, then you know that sometimes the minimum wage isn't really the minimum at all, especially if you run into customers like this.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "RESERVOIR DOGS")

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Shots - Health News
10:58 am
Thu March 27, 2014

A Booming Economy Doesn't Save Children From Malnutrition

Indian schoolchildren wait in line for food at a government primary school in Hyderabad, India. Consistent access to nutritious food and clean water is key to helping children thrive, researchers say.
Noah Seelam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:29 am

Lack of food is the leading cause of child death worldwide, killing 3.1 million children each year and accounting for 45 percent of all child mortality.

Undernourished children who survive still face a daunting future, including reduced intellectual capacity and a higher risk of disease and disability. And while economic growth is presumed to get more children fed, a booming economy alone doesn't fix the problem, researchers say.

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The Two-Way
9:49 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Weekly Jobless Claims Drop, GDP Growth Revised Up Slightly

The economic news about both last quarter and last week is on the positive side:

-- The Bureau of Economic Analysis says the economy grew at a 2.6 percent annual rate in fourth-quarter 2013, a bit better than its previous estimate that gross domestic product had expanded at a 2.4 percent pace.

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Business
6:13 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Board Rules Athletes At Northwestern University Are Employees

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 12:18 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

A major ruling by a federal agency could turn the multibillion dollar business of college sports upside down. The top National Labor Relations Board official in Chicago says college football players on scholarship at Northwestern University can unionize.

NPR's David Schaper reports.

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Paying For College
2:56 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Senator Warns Of A Student Loan Bubble

Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, presents a Senate report on for-profit colleges in 2012. He wants changes to the federal student loan system.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 12:18 pm

Each year, the federal government provides more than $150 billion in grants and loans to help students pay for college. And while a bachelor's degree has become increasingly valuable, young people are taking on record levels of debt to earn that degree.

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Energy
5:13 am
Wed March 26, 2014

German Chemical Giant BASF Benefits From Cheap U.S. Natural Gas

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 7:39 am

Thanks to fracking, there is an abundance of natural gas at about a quarter of the European price. This influx of business may be good for the U.S., but it's cause for concern for European leaders.

The Salt
3:22 am
Wed March 26, 2014

In Mexico And U.S., Lime Lovers Feel Squeezed By High Prices

A worker unloads a truck full of Mexican limes at a citrus packing plant in La Ruana, in the state of Michoacan, Mexico.
Dario Lopez-Mills AP

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 2:11 pm

Has the price of your margarita cocktail shot up? Guacamole more expensive? Blame it on limes.

About 98 percent of limes consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico. But our neighbors to the south are feeling seriously squeezed by a shortage of the beloved citrus fruit.

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