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This is what has unfolded in Greece in the past week:

June 26: Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras announces a July 5 referendum on terms put forward by the strapped country's creditors and urges his people to vote "no."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The U.S. economy keeps adding jobs at a steady pace, but the Labor Department report for June also shows more people are leaving the labor force and wages are not rising.

The economy added 223,000 jobs last month as unemployment fell to its lowest rate since 2008, the Labor Department said Thursday. The jobless rate dipped to 5.3 percent from 5.5 percent in May.

Georgia Leads A Push To Help Ex-Prisoners Get Jobs

9 hours ago

In the 1990s, states went on a prison-building binge. Today, millions who spent time in those prisons are back in society — and many are struggling to find work.

Jay Neal is in charge of Georgia's new office of re-entry. Its purpose is clear: "Helping Georgia's returning citizens find training, assisting Georgia's returning citizens find jobs," he reads off the website.

Returning citizens is America's new term for ex-prisoners, ex-cons and former inmates.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Economists surveyed by Reuters are predicting that employers added about 230,000 jobs to their payrolls in June. That's less than the month before but still a pretty strong showing.

Because of the Independence Day holiday, the unemployment report is being released on Thursday at 8:30 a.m. ET. It is normally issued on a Friday.

The U.S. economy slowed a lot over the winter, but as the weather has improved so has the job market. On Wednesday, the payroll processing company ADP said private employers added about 237,000 jobs in June — the biggest gain since December.

PODCAST: Rice in Cuba

12 hours ago
David Brancaccio

It would appear people are dropping out of the American labor force in spite of new jobs created. More on that. Plus, as the U.S. announces plans to open a full embassy in Cuba, we look at the American rice industry, which is poised to benefit from more normalized relations, and ask how they’re preparing for changes ahead between the two countries. And with the Greek economy nearly immobilized by its debt, and Puerto Rico close to default, does the U.S. have lessons to learn from these situations? Marketplace's senior economics correspondent Chris Farrell weighs in.

Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: Major U.S. airlines are the subject of a federal investigation by the Department of Justice looking into whether they may be illegally coordinating to keep ticket prices up. More on that. Plus, we'll talk about New York City's ban on so-called “poor doors,” the separate entrances to mixed-income buildings that were to be used by lower-income residents. Plus, a conversation with Elizabeth Holmes, who at 31 is the youngest female, self-made multi-billionaire in America, according to Forbes.

U.S. rice growers want to get in on Cuba

13 hours ago
Tracey Samuelson

The U.S. will open an embassy in Havana, Cuba — so said President Barack Obama Tuesday, a significant step showing that efforts to normalize relations with Cuba are ticking along. However, the embargo still stands and only Congress can lift it. Should that happen, many U.S. exporters will stand to benefit, including American rice farmers.

Ray Stoesser grows about 4,000 to 5,000 acres of rice on his Texas farm and would very much like to see some of it head to Cuba.

Marketplace Tech for Thursday, July 2, 2015

13 hours ago
Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: First up, we'll talk with Nathaniel Popper, author of "Digital Gold: Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money," about whether or not the banking crisis in Greece is good for Bitcoin. And Matt Novak, who writes Gizmodo’s Paleofuture blog, joins us to talk about Back to the Future: Part 2 and the origins of our obsession with hoverboards.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Donna Karan leaves behind a fashion legacy

Jul 1, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Daisy Palacios

Over the last two decades, Donna Karan International has been one of the biggest brands in the fashion industry. Founder and chief designer Donna Karan announced on Tuesday that she was leaving her namesake company to focus on other projects.

Fashion journalist Kate Betts says that Karan has left a clear impact in the world of fashion.

“She designed for women in a way that was very sensuous and much more feminine than previous looks for women,” Betts says.  “It was a revelation for many professional women.”

Marketplace for Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Jul 1, 2015

Airing on Wednesday, July 1, 2015: Puerto Rico is in dire financial straits.  So what, you might shrug. Well, if any of your money is invested in a municipal bond fund, you might own Puerto Rican bonds, and they could take a hit. Marketplace's Adam Allington finds out who’s vulnerable. Next: Speaking today in Tennessee, President Obama will try to court conservative states to expand Medicaid under Obamacare. We unpack his sales pitch on using federal dollars to help states’ bottom lines.

The Obamacare sales pitch

Jul 1, 2015
D Gorenstein

It’s been almost a week since the Supreme Court’s momentous ruling that further cements the Affordable Care Act as the law of the land, and Wednesday President Barack Obama flew to Nashville, Tennessee, to talk about health care.

While some consider this a bit of a victory lap, the president’s choice of Tennessee suggests it’s much more of an overture.

Checking in with the secretary of commerce

Jul 1, 2015
Daisy Palacios and Kai Ryssdal

From the Export-Import Bank to the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal, a lot has been happening in the commerce world. We sat down with Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker to discuss the latest commerce news.

The Export-Import bank officially closed Tuesday — a move Pritzker wants reversed. 

“We need to re-establish and reauthorize the Export-Import Bank. This is a critical tool to keep U.S. businesses competitive in the global economy," Pritzker says.   

Ford and Chrysler sales kicked into gear for June

Jul 1, 2015
Mark Garrison

Two of the Big Three American automakers — Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and Ford Motor Co. — are reporting nice gains in their June sales, according to numbers out Wednesday. A stronger job market and easy access to credit are spurring many Americans to trade up from the older cars in their garages.

But that’s not the only reason carmakers are happy these days. A booming housing market is also a factor: contractors are breaking ground on more homes, which means they’re buying more trucks.

Jeff Tyler

Just like the lottery, sports contracts can pay more when the profits are spread out over time. For example, let’s consider two of, arguably, the most bone-headed (or brilliant?) sports contracts of all time. The deal to fold the St. Louis Spirits has been called one of the best sports deals of all time. The contract has been so profitable that it’s used as a textbook example by business school professors. During basketball season, the deal inspires sports reporters to ask, “Would you believe a team that doesn’t exist still makes $17 million a year?”

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has reiterated his call for a "no" vote in Sunday's referendum on conditions imposed by the nation's creditors for a bailout. He insisted, despite warnings to the contrary, that a rejection of the proposals was not about membership in the eurozone.

"No means pressure for a viable economic agreement," he said in a televised address to the nation.

He then explained his position in a series of tweets:

The 66th floor of Panama City's Trump Tower is a fine spot to experience Panama's booming economy. Beyond the building's windows, hundreds of skyscrapers stretch the length of the capital's skyline. Inside, a hand of blackjack will set you back $200, but all-you-can-drink champagne costs just $10.

On average, economic growth in Panama has topped 8 percent in the last five years, making the country the envy of its struggling Latin American neighbors.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

At the end of World War II with the continent in ruins, Winston Churchill famously proclaimed, "We must build a United States of Europe." He believed such a union would bring an end to centuries of European wars.

For 70 years Europe has been engaged in a political and economic quest to make that happen. But many in Greece, such as Athens cabdriver Jordan Repanidis, feel this historic reshaping of the Western world has a stranglehold on their country.

PODCAST: The strong dollar

Jul 1, 2015
David Brancaccio

With emergency funding drying up, the Greek government sends a letter to creditors saying it might accept terms of a bailout. More on that. We'll also talk to Allan Sloan of the Washington Post about how the strong dollar is ironically helping U.S. businesses.

Airing on Wednesday, July 1, 2015: Greece's prime minister has reportedly sent a letter to the European Commission agreeing to most of Europe's conditions for a financial bailout. We'll talk to Elena Panaritis, chief economic adviser to the Greek Ministry of Finance, for more. Plus, starting Wednesday, career and vocational programs are facing tougher regulations that have been years in the making. The new so-called “gainful employment” rule is meant to crack down on programs that load students up with debt for courses that don’t lead to decent jobs.

Amy Scott

Starting Wednesday, career and vocational programs are facing tougher regulations that have been years in the making. The new so-called “gainful employment” rule is meant to crack down on programs that load students up with debt for courses that don’t lead to decent jobs. The rules especially target for-profit colleges, which often make close to 90 percent of their revenue from taxpayer dollars.

Puerto Rico's exodus: vicious cycles and silver linings

Jul 1, 2015
Sabri Ben-Achour

As Puerto Rico slides deeper into financial distress, flirting with default on July payments on its $72 billion debt, Puerto Ricans are leaving the island. They have been for a decade, in the largest outmigration since the '60s. 

“There’s so much uncertainty about what’s going to happen in Puerto Rico, it’s kind of crazy,” says Carlos Aponte, a 29-year-old native of San Juan who moved to New York last year so that his wife could pursue her medical residency.

The job opportunities here are a world away from on the island.   

We're so over you, millennials

Jul 1, 2015
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Move over, millennials. Marketers are zeroing in on the next generation — people still under 18 — whom they’re calling centennials.

Advertising giant WPP has just announced a new partnership with the Daily Mail newspaper and Snapchat. Why Snapchat? It has a reputation as the app for teens. So that’s where advertising money is going. 

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