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Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg may have taken an extended paternity leave after the birth of his daughter, but generally, American men do not take more than a few days. Ninety-six percent of American men are back to work within two weeks of a baby's birth.

Iran and Boeing go way back. Boeing was the largest supplier of civilian aircraft to Iran before the country's 1979 Islamic revolution. And despite the fraught relations between the U.S. and Iran since then, Iran has kept flying those planes for decades.

As part of the recent Iranian nuclear deal and the lifting of sanctions, Boeing is once again permitted to sell planes to the Islamic Republic. And Iran desperately wants to start replacing its fleet of aging, worn-out commercial aircraft.

Everyone knows the GOP is the party of small government and low taxes. At last night's debate, the 2016 Republican presidential candidates sparred over who had the best fiscal conservatism cred.

We decided to look at how well candidates told the truth on a few of these claims in our latest debate fact check.

"After New Jersey raised taxes on millionaires, we lost, in the next four years, $70 billion in wealth left our state." — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie

It's not that simple.

In 2009, one of the founders of the online eyeglass maker Warby Parker approached management consultant Adam Grant about becoming an early investor. Grant says he declined because the company's founders weren't working at their startup full time; he also says it was the worst financial decision he's ever made.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There was a time when it felt like Keurig coffee pods were going to take over the world — or at least encircle it.

But now sales are on the decline, down some $60 million from last year.

The company has faced criticism because the individual coffee pods are not kind to the environment. But Venessa Wong with BuzzFeed says that's not the only factor that's contributed to the decline in sales.

Emily Martin created a state-by-state map of the gender wage gap in the United States. She calculated: Washington, D.C., has the smallest wage gap where women average nearly 90 cents to a man's dollar; Louisiana has the largest gap — women there earn just 65 percent of what men do.

Nationally, women earn an average 79 cents for every dollar men do. The gender wage gap is even wider for black and Hispanic women.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

With all the recent controversy around the cost of prescription drugs, we got to wondering how exactly do companies decide how much they should charge for a drug? So we asked NPR health policy correspondent Alison Kodjak to look into it.

The jobs numbers are in: 150,000 jobs were added to the economy in January. That's fewer than expected, though the unemployment rate fell to an eight-year low.

President Obama took the opportunity this morning to take a shot at some of his more vocal opponents.

"The United States of America, right now, has strongest, most durable economy in the world," he said. "I know that's still inconvenient for GOP stump speeches, as their 'Doom And Despair' tour plays in New Hampshire — I guess you cannot please everybody."

The cystic fibrosis drug Orkambi can help people with specific genetic mutations breathe better, but treatment with the pill comes with a hefty sticker price — $259,000 a year.

Orkambi, which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration last July, is expected to take almost $36 million from California's general fund this fiscal year and next. That cost estimate doesn't include any discounts the state may receive from drug manufacturers.

Is Colorado's public employee pension fund in peril?

Feb 5, 2016
Lizzie O'Leary

Public Employees' Retirement Association also known as "PERA" is Colorado's state pension fund and  it's currently short about $26 billion in what it owes to over 500 thousand members across the state. 

The Super Bowl coin toss has a secret history

Feb 5, 2016

Assuming the laws of physics cooperate, the Super Bowl is going to start on Sunday with the flip of a coin. This being the NFL, it's not just any old coin, of course. Every year, Highland Mint manufactures the coin and collectible replicas, but there's a dark backstory to the company.

Caleb Hannan wrote about it for Bloomberg Businessweek in a piece called "The Super Bowl Toss Has a Dark Secret." 

A short history of the post-Super Bowl TV show

Feb 5, 2016
Tony Wagner

"The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" just has a packed slate of guests for his live episode Sunday following the Super Bowl.

Colbert is the first late night host to directly follow the game; that enviable time slot is usually reserved for promising young shows the network wants to give a big ratings boost. The Super Bowl pulled in a record 114 million viewers last year, and it's about the best lead-in you could ask for, but it's not a ratings guarantee.

Is this 'full employment' yet?

Feb 5, 2016

January’s employment report from the Labor Department was a mixed bag.

Here are the key takeaways:

The U.S. economy added just 151,000 jobs in January while unemployment dropped slightly, to 4.9 percent, according to the latest figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Economists had expected to see about 190,000 new jobs.

The unemployment rate, which has held steady at 5 percent the past few months, dropped slightly to 4.9 percent. It's the first time unemployment has fallen below 5 percent since the recession.

Know what executives at Coca-Cola, IBM, Verizon and American Express have in common? A profound concern over how much they are paying every year for healthcare.

So 20 of the most recognizable names in corporate America have formed what they are calling the Health Transformation Alliance. The point is to share data about prices and outcomes and see if they can crack the healthcare black box to find some value.

Well, now 20 companies are ready to get dirty in data

Marketplace for Friday, February 5, 2016

Feb 5, 2016

Breaking down the January jobs report; the last installment of "My Economy" from the border; and how a troubled economy and the Zika virus are impacting Brazil's annual carnival.

Snow-zilla could have been Job-zilla — but it wasn't.

Feb 5, 2016

Economists are generally underwhelmed by this morning's monthly jobs report, which came in below expectations, with 151,000 jobs added to the economy, after a stellar end to 2015.

Author Susan Orlean takes the Marketplace Quiz

Feb 5, 2016

You might have heard of the "Proust Questionnaire." It's a set of questions about values and dreams improperly attributed to French writer Marcel Proust. (He actually answered it a few times, but didn't come up with it himself.) We came up with our own version, because what we do for a living, spend our money on and why usually reveals more about our personalities than we'd expect.

Weekly Wrap: breaking down the jobs report

Feb 5, 2016

Joining us to talk about the week's business and economic news are the Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy and Leigh Gallagher of Fortune. The big topics this week: the jobs report, global economy and the possibility of a recession

 

Dispatch from the Valley: Super Bowl City

Feb 5, 2016

Welcome to what I hope will be a new weekly feature: dispatches from the weird world of business and tech here in the Bay Area. This week, I paid a visit to Super Bowl City, the place where branding, extreme love of football, and high tech collide (with extremely terrifying security). And some thoughts on what happens when political debate plays out in your safe space: Facebook. Plus, a book recommendation!

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

My Economy: Economic aspirations in a borderland

Feb 5, 2016
Kai Ryssdal and Daisy Palacios

Bowie High School sits just 100 yards from the U.S-Mexico border. It’s one of the oldest operating high schools in El Paso, Texas. Students have a view of Juárez from their basketball courts.

Why disappointing jobs numbers aren't all bad news

Feb 5, 2016

On today's show, we talk about weaker jobs numbers than expected (and why it's not all bad news); growing viewership of the NFL from Hispanic fans; and a magician tells us about the most magical deck of cards money can buy.

The Super Bowl, or El Gran Juego?

Feb 5, 2016
Andy Uhler

Last week Nielsen reported that this season’s NFL games averaged 1.7 million Hispanic viewers – up 17 percent since the 2012 season. Stephen Master, head of the global sports group at Nielsen, said that number was even higher in households where Spanish is the dominant language.

“Their viewership increased 28 percent over the last five years," he said, "which is pretty phenomenal.”

Marketplace

Airing on Friday, February 5, 2016: On today's show, we'll talk about the upcoming jobs report for January; and Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina joins us to talk about growth for new businesses, and ABC's decision to not include her in Saturday's Republican debate. 

Marketplace Tech for Friday, February 5, 2016

Feb 5, 2016
Marketplace

Airing on Friday, February 5, 2016: On today's show, we'll talk about a slowdown in iPhone production in China; and Sophie Bushwick, the project editor at Popular Science who covers DIY, tech, and science news, joins us for this week's Silicon Tally.

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