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It has been five years since the so-called flash crash on Wall Street raised big questions about computerized trading. What caused the flash crash has been a topic of debate ever since. U.S. officials revived the debate this week by arresting a little-known trader in London.

May 6, 2010 started out as an ordinary trading day on Wall Street. Then, at around 2:45 in the afternoon, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged nearly 600 points within the space of a few minutes, before correcting itself.

High on a West Bank hilltop, the extended Dissi family gathered on a recent weekend for a day out in the Palestinian countryside.

Aunts, uncles and cousins came to see the half-built weekend home of Taysier Dissi, an electrician and father of three. The concrete-block shell, with windows set and stairs roughed in, is placed just right for the view.

This will be the family's getaway from their home in the cramped confines of Jerusalem's often tense Old City. Dissi paid about $30,000 for one-third of an acre here, bought from a Palestinian-Canadian company, UCI.

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting Organized

About Ricardo Semler's TED Talk

When Ricardo Semler became the CEO of his father's company, he reorganized it with the belief that less management and more flexibility meant a better workplace and bigger profits.

About Ricardo Semler

The Apple Watch is making quite a splash with its launch Friday, but most of us have never thought about this new gadget, the "smart watch." Is it a luxury item, or is the smart watch destined to be the next great essential, something we don't know we'll need but will.

When it closed at 5,056.06 on Thursday, the Nasdaq Composite Index hit a new high — surpassing the old record close of 5,048.62, reached March 10, 2000, during the dot-com craze.

That also makes it 15 years since that infamous tech bubble burst, sending the index down more than 75 percent by the time it hit bottom.

There's a growing battle in Washington, especially among Republicans, over the Export-Import Bank, an 80-year-old federal agency that helps to finance American companies in foreign trade. Congress must reauthorize the bank by June 30 or it will shut down.

Marketplace for Thursday, April 23, 2015

Apr 23, 2015

Pacific trade and the fear of currency manipulation

Apr 23, 2015
Adam Allington

A free-trade deal among the United States and 11 Pacific nations called the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) is wending its way through Capitol Hill. Opposition to the deal has been largely united under the threat of currency manipulation.

Generally speaking, a country with a weaker currency is thought to have an advantage in trade, because their stuff is cheaper. So, currency manipulation is when a central bank buys or sells a lot foreign currency in an attempt to influence the exchange rate. 

Deutsche Bank, Germany's largest bank, has been fined $2.5 billion by U.S. and U.K. regulators for trying to manipulate the so-called LIBOR rate, a benchmark for interbank loans, which in turn is used to set interest rates on everything from credit card debt to mortgages.

The German bank is one of eight financial institutions, including Swiss-based UBS and the Royal Bank of Scotland, that were caught up in the scandal, which involved dozens of traders and managers and spanned a four-year period from 2005-2009.

Checking in with Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky

Apr 23, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

Brian Chesky is the 33-year-old co-founder and CEO of Airbnb, a company that he says may very well be “the worst idea that ever worked.” The website allows users to rent rooms, apartments, houses, and even yurts from people they’ve never met, all around the world.

Tidal's wave is breaking

Apr 23, 2015
Tony Wagner

$1.7 billion

Privately run Medicare plans, fresh off a lobbying victory that reversed proposed budget cuts, face new scrutiny from government investigators and whistleblowers who allege that plans have overcharged the government for years.

When it comes to negotiating salaries, the research is pretty clear: women are less assertive than men. It's one reason women who start their careers with a narrower pay gap see it widen over time.

Carnegie Mellon economics professor Linda Babcock, who studies the gender pay gap, says men are four times more likely to negotiate their pay. That keeps women at a disadvantage, though they're not always aware of it.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Marketplace for Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Apr 22, 2015

A Somali who's living and working abroad wants to send money to his grandmother in a remote village. A money transfer company gets the cash delivered in a flash.

An aid organization wants to pay its Somali staff. Again, money transfer companies do the job in a country where the banking system shut down in 1991, when the government collapsed.

Is It Time To Make Medical And Family Leave Paid?

Apr 22, 2015

It's been more than 20 years since passage of the landmark Family and Medical Leave Act, which allows workers to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid time off for medical or family reasons without losing their jobs.

Molly Wood

The annual RSA Conference is the largest security trade show in the world, and this year, there’s an extra level of desperation in the air. Security vendors and IT chiefs are looking to big data to help them understand how to protect companies from the ever-increasing tide of hackers looking to break in.

The transition to adulthood marks a big turning point in life for everyone, but for young people on the autism spectrum that transition can be really tough.

Young adults with autism had lower employment rates and higher rates of complete social isolation than people with other disabilities, according to a report published Tuesday by the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute.

Marketplace for Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Apr 21, 2015
Marketplace

Like many Democrats, including the current president, Hillary Clinton has had difficulty maintaining a consistent position on international trade.

As President Obama seeks fast-track authority for a 12-country Pacific trade deal and Congress inches toward giving it to him, Clinton is hedging on a deal she once strongly backed.

Knock it off! A step-by-step guide to make a bag

Apr 21, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Mukta Mohan

When you’re a small business owner, the last thing you want is for people to copy your products. That’s exactly what happened to Dave Munson, CEO of Saddleback Leather, but instead of tracking down the knockoffs and suing the creators — he made a YouTube video.

His step-by-step tongue-in-cheek video teaches people exactly how to make his bags. It lists every part of the process, from choosing the leather, to cutting the patterns, to sewing the bag together.

The largest publicly run health plan in the nation, L.A. Care, will allow customers who do not have traditional bank accounts to pay their health insurance premiums with cash.

Saving enough money to retire can be tough. But it's next to impossible if a financial adviser is steering the client into bad investments — and getting big commissions in return. And according to the Obama administration, that's exactly what too many advisers have been doing.

Millions of Americans trying to save for retirement have ended up with investments where high fees cripple their returns over time. U.S. Labor Secretary Tom Perez says much of that is due to bad advice.

Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution.

You may never have heard of Moore's law, but it has a lot do with why you will pay about the same price for your next computer, smartphone or tablet, even though it will be faster and have better screen resolution than the last one.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The prime minister of Japan, Shinzo Abe, said Monday that his country is nearing a major trade agreement with the United States, according to an interview with The Wall Street Journal.

Abe told the Journal that he hopes to come to an understanding with President Barack Obama when he visits Washington at the end of the month as part of a 12-country summit.

Marketplace for Monday, April 20, 2015

Apr 20, 2015
Marketplace

A start-up is creating t-shirt tycoons

Apr 20, 2015
Tony Wagner

$5 million

That's how much one small store on Chicago's south side sold in lottery tickets last year. Lucky Mart used to be a convenience store, but after selling a ticket that won big, the shop rebranded and now sells lottery tickets almost exclusively. At the time our reporter visited the store, officials came by with a plaque naming Lucky Mart the top-grossing location for the Illinois state lottery.

7 million

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