Business

Business news

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

President-elect Donald Trump's pick to run the Department of Health and Human Services is taking heat for his controversial stock holdings in companies affected by laws he has worked on and voted for. But federal records show several senators who will take part in confirmation hearings for Rep. Tom Price, a Georgia Republican, have substantial health-related holdings as well.

Chances are you or somebody you know has recently become the owner of an Instant Pot, the multifunction electric pressure cooker that can produce fork-tender pot roasts in less than an hour, as well as brown meat, cook beans without soaking, and even do the job of a rice cooker or crockpot.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Trade, Trump and the theater

11 hours ago

Trump's nominee for Secretary of Commerce, billionaire investor Wilbur Ross, has a lot of opinions on trade. Philip Levy, from the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, breaks down what the department actually does when it comes to that issue. Next, we'll talk about Trump's relationship with our currency and the markets. The U.S. dollar fell to its lowest level in weeks after he said it was too strong. Is volatility something we need to get used to? Plus: a look at Woody Harrelson's plan to direct and star in a livestreamed film called "Lost in London." 

Live from London: It’s Woody Harrelson

12 hours ago

In an effort to boost movie theater attendance on weekdays, Fathom Entertainment on Thursday will live stream “Lost In London,” a one-hour live movie shot by Woody Harrelson. Strong ticket sales could make a difference to this small but growing segment of the movie theater business.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Let’s do the numbers: the cost of inauguration

15 hours ago
inauguration.jpg
Sabri Ben-Achour and Marketplace staff

President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration celebration Friday may cost millions of dollars, but American taxpayers aren’t footing the entire bill.

“The taxpayer pays for everything surrounding the actual ceremony that's involved with swearing in the president,” Washington Post reporter Roxanne Roberts told us. “But all the things that we typically think of as part of an inaugural — parade, the balls, the fancy parties — are privately funded by the Presidential Inaugural Committee.”

01/18/2017: 'Mutually assured economic destruction'

17 hours ago
economicdeestruction.jpg
Marketplace

It's another week of confirmation hearings for Trump's cabinet picks. We'll share the highlights from Betsy Devos's contentious hearing, and look at what we can expect from Tom Price's. Next, Marketplace's Scott Tong will discuss what the relationship between the U.S. and China might look like after Trump takes office. Do we have a future trade war on our hands? 

netflix_4.jpg
Marketplace

Think the rise of digital means a reduced ecological footprint? Turns out streaming the latest hit show might be bad for the environment, according to a new Greenpeace report. Quartz's Ashley Rodriguez explains how exactly the streaming industry uses energyAfterwards, we'll look at news that online grocery stores will soon be allowed to accept food stamps, and then talk about the possibility of bendable phones.

In a flood of clemency orders before he leaves office, President Obama commuted the sentences of 209 people and pardoned 64 others on Tuesday. The vast majority of offenders had been convicted of drug-related crimes. Two were involved in cases about leaks of government material. And two were cultural stars of past decades who had run afoul of the IRS.

For several years, Oxfam International has released an annual report on global wealth inequity. The numbers were startling: In the 2016 report, Oxfam said the world's richest 62 people owned as much wealth as the poorest 3.6 billion.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

As the presidency of Barack Obama comes to an end, we're taking stock - and so is he.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

In an article last month on state goals for 2017, China's Xinhua news agency reported, "China has lifted 700 million people out of poverty through more than 30 years of reform and opening-up," while aiming to "lift" 10 million more in the coming year.

The number of people 60 and older with student loan debt has quadrupled in the past decade, and older Americans now represent the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. student loan market, according to a new report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

As of 2015, more than 2.8 million Americans over 60 had outstanding student loan debt — up from some 700,000 in 2005.

Before Luke Whitbeck began taking a $300,000-a-year drug, the 2-year-old's health was inexplicably failing.

A pale boy with enormous eyes, Luke frequently ran high fevers, tired easily and was skinny all over, except his belly stuck out like a bowling ball.

"What does your medicine do for you?" Luke's mother, Meg, asked after his weekly drug treatment recently.

Donald Trump’s breaks with the GOP on a border tax

Jan 17, 2017

President-elect Donald Trump has said he wants a big border tax on imported goods to encourage corporations to set up factories in the U.S. Republican leaders in Congress don't love the idea, and they've come up with their own plan.

It’s called a border-adjusted tax. However, in an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Trump said the GOP plan is too complicated, opening a potential rift with the party. 

La-La-Land-Featured-2.jpg
Molly Wood

If you're tired of superhero sequels and "Star Wars" dominating the box office, get ready for an onslaught of musicals.

Hollywood has been afraid of the genre for decades, but thanks to some recent successes, execs are changing their tune. According to the New York Times, studios have at least 20 new musicals in the works.

The long arm of the pharmaceutical industry continues to pervade practically every area of medicine, reaching those who write guidelines that shape doctors' practices, patient advocacy organizations, letter writers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and even oncologists on Twitter, according to a series of papers on money and influence published Tuesday in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Britain's prime minister said Tuesday that the United Kingdom will walk away from the European Union's single market and unified court system, making a sharp break with its largest trading partner.

In a speech delivered about six months after voters passed a referendum requiring Britain to leave the EU, Prime Minister Theresa May laid out a plan for what that split would look like, emphasizing limits on migration into the country.

President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for education secretary, Betsy DeVos, is in the hot seat this evening, the latest Cabinet pick to face a Senate confirmation hearing. DeVos is a billionaire whose family has given millions of dollars to support conservative Christian causes and Republican politicians, including five senators on the committee overseeing the confirmation process. Though she has no experience working in schools, DeVos has had a long career as an education activist, pushing for more choice for families who want to opt their kids out of traditional public schools.

Autodesk CEO on 3D printing and human inferiority

Jan 17, 2017
Carl-Bass-Autodesk-8695.jpg
Molly Wood and Robert Garrova

A lot of the things around us — cars and the planes and buildings — were designed using a piece of software called AutoCAD. The 'CAD' stands for Computer Aided Design. And the program has been the go-to for designers since the 80s. It used to be the most-used design software in the world. Now, decades after its founding, Autodesk has expanded from helping people make buildings to helping people make all kinds of things with the help of 3D printers.

Autodesk President and CEO Carl Bass on why 3D printing is a good investment:

In a major speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Chinese President Xi Jinping positioned himself as a defender of globalization and free trade.

John Lee Hancock on making a movie about an iconic founder

Jan 17, 2017
338_TF_D009_DM_03513R.JPG
Molly Wood and Bridget Bodnar

Ray Kroc is the man behind McDonald’s unprecedented rise from local burger joint fast food giant, but he didn’t come up with the idea that was the McDonalds brothers.  John Lee Hancock’s new film “The Founder” examines how Kroc, played by Michael Keaton, became partners with the brothers and eventually bought them out of their business.

John Lee Hanock on why he wanted to do this story:

What the Equinox CEO knows about your lifestyle goals

Jan 17, 2017

Equinox Holdings is the company behind the fitness clubs of the same name, as well as SoulCycle and a chain of no-frills gyms called Blink. Now, they're getting into the hotel business. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talks to Equinox CEO Harvey Spevak about what he realized about the way we work-out way before anyone else did, and what that means for the way we want to live.

Subscribe to the Corner Office podcast on iTunes.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Polish-falcons-2-MAIN.jpg
Marketplace

To wrap up our yearlong series "How The Deck is Stacked," we travel to Erie, Pennsylvania, a community built on manufacturing. Erie represents much of the economic dissatisfaction that helped swing the presidential election. We're kicking off a week of coverage from there with a bunch of stories from a local watering hole. Plus, the latest on Brexit and President-elect Donald Trump's promised border tax.

Copyright 2017 WSHU Public Radio Group. To see more, visit WSHU Public Radio Group.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A visit to Erie's Polish Falcons

Jan 17, 2017
Polish-falcons-2-MAIN.jpg
Marketplace

For the past year, we've been working on "How the Deck Is Stacked" with "Frontline" and "PBS NewsHour," a series about the economy and the election, and what one means and has meant for the other.

Here's what we were looking for to wrap up this series: a not-coastal county, not too big, not too small, founded on what built this country — manufacturing — trying to find its way in a changing economy.

But we had one more criterion: We wanted to find a place that had voted for President Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012, and Trump in 2016.

Pages