budget cuts

Don Rush

The Appoquinimink School District will be shelling out more of its local share for some construction projects after the Delaware state budget cuts.

But the district’s finance director Chuck Longfellow told the Wilmington News Journal that there will be no effect on the taxpayers or school operations.

Under the referendum that provided local taxpayer for the construction local government was to foot 25 percent of the bill while the state was supposed to pick up the other 75 percent.

creative commons

The $26 million budget cut for public education in Delaware has sent local districts scrambling to see what they can do with less money.

WBOC reports that the Capital School District took an  $1.4 million hit but expects to avoid layoffs even as it balances its budget.

But the President of the Education Board Sean Christiansen told the television station that the cuts could force the district to authorize a referendum – the first in 13 years.

Official photo

There’s only a week left in the Delaware state legislative session.

And state Senate leaders told the Wilmington News Journal that they do not intend to hold votes on issues like hiking the minimum wage or re-instating the death penalty.

Much of the discussion is being taken up with last minute negotiations over the state budget which is facing a $350 million shortfall.

Legislative leaders say proposed tax hikes are still up in the air along propose budget cuts that proved extremely unpopular during the early going of the budgetary process.

U.S. Department of Education

As Delaware lawmakers struggle to close a nearly $400 million budget deficit, educators are concerned about the hit the state's public schools might take when the wrangling is all over. One of those is Fredericka Jenner, president of the Delaware State Education Association. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush spoke with the outgoing president about the proposed cuts could have.

Don Rush

DOVER, Del. (AP) - Democrats are proposing a new personal income tax bracket starting at $150,000 while Republicans are calling for broad fiscal reform as Delaware lawmakers continue struggling to fashion a budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

Frustration remained evident among Republican and Democratic legislative leaders Tuesday as the July 1 start of the fiscal year looms closer with no budget agreement in sight.

Republicans say Democrats don't appear to be serious about cutting state spending.

official photo

DOVER, Del. (AP) - Gov. John Carney is appearing before Delaware lawmakers to outline his political agenda for the next year and his priorities for his first year in office.

Carney, who took office in January, is scheduled to speak to a joint session of the legislature on Thursday.

Among the issues he is expected to address are the budget challenges facing the state and his ideas for creating jobs and growing Delaware's economy.

campaign photo

There will be cuts but no new taxes.

That’s the upshot of the $284 million operating budget put forward by New Castle County Executive Matt Meyer.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that he is proposing $194 million in spending from the general fund which amounts to a 4 percent increase.

But Meyer expects a $13 million deficit over the coming year, which he says, will be met with spending cuts as well as the county’s tax stabilization reserves.

Meyers wants to reduce overtime and reinstate premiums for Medicare retirees.

campaign photo

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland Democrats in the state legislature will be talking about how proposed cuts in the federal budget could affect the state.

House Speaker Michael Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller are scheduled to gather with fellow Democrats on Thursday in Annapolis.

Maryland lawmakers have been particularly concerned about how President Donald Trump's budget proposal could hurt the state.

Maryland is home to a large number of federal workers, and federal agencies are headquartered in the state.

official campaign photo

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe said the state's economy is improving and he won't have to cut as much from the state budget as previously thought.

McAuliffe told reporters Monday that he and other state officials are "cautiously optimistic" about the direction of the state's economy, in part because of an increase in state payroll tax revenues in recent months. The governor made the comments following a private meeting with state budget officials and business leaders.

Don Rush

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe is announcing a series of budget measures that includes canceling pay raises, trimming the state's payroll, and using the state's rainy day fund.

McAuliffe announced the measures Thursday at the Capitol, adding that he'd had to make difficult decisions and there may me more to come.

freepik.com

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe is asking his administration's agency heads to suggest where to cut state spending to help bridge an estimated $1.5 billion budget gap.

The Virginian-Pilot reports that McAuliffe's chief of staff, Paul Reagan, sent a memo to agency heads asking them to submit proposal of how to cut spending by 5 percent.

The proposals are due Sept. 20.

creative commons

There will be a $3 million cut in discretionary spending for the Indian River School District budget next year.

WBOC reports that the money will allow for funding more teachers to meet the growth in the district.

Superintendent Dr. Susan Bunting told the station that this was an effort to maintain a safe level of the district’s eroding reserves.

She described the cuts as a short-term fix as the district grapples with student population growth that has jumped by 25 percent over the last ten years.

official photo

Delaware state budget writers on the Joint Finance Committee will be looking for more cuts as they face lower state revenue from taxes and fees projections.

The committed eliminated the new education spending proposed by the Governor Jack Markell that would have gone to technology upgrades and teacher pay increases.

Delaware legislators also cut 1 percent from the operation budgets of the state’s higher education institutions.

In addition, money for body cameras to be used by state law enforcement in the wake recent police shootings also went by the wayside.

creative commons

The third try may be the charm.

The Christina School district is taking one more swipe at convincing voters to raise taxes after the last two efforts were rejected in referendums.

The district will be asking voters on March 23rd to approve a 30 cent increase per $100 of assessed property value.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that’s 20 percent less than what the district had sought last year.

School officials argue that the money is needed after it cut its budget by $9 million when that last referendum was rejected.

governor.maryland.gov

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - The Maryland Board of Public Works has delayed a vote on whether to abolish 63 positions in the state's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
 
Gov. Larry Hogan made the proposal to the board, which considered it at Thursday's meeting in Annapolis.
 
Abolishing the positions would take a majority vote of the three-member board. The members include Hogan, Comptroller Peter Franchot and Treasurer Nancy Kopp.
 

official photo

BALTIMORE (AP) - Maryland's Sen. Ben Cardin is holding a forum to discuss federal workforce concerns.

The Democrat has scheduled the forum in Baltimore on Friday with employees of the Social Security Administration.

The senator says the nation's federal employees are too often targeted with harmful cuts to positions and programs without thought for the people working on behalf of the public.

Don Rush

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) - The Christina School District has begun cutting costs to address a budget deficit after voters nixed a plan to raise property taxes to cover growing school costs.

The Wilmington News Journal reports the district is freezing hiring, cancelling travel for personnel and cutting school budgets. Principals are being asked to cut overtime, reduce contracted services and eliminate unfilled positions in which teachers get extra pay to serve as coaches or advisers.

Don Rush

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Advocates for the developmentally disabled are planning to urge lawmakers to restore funding cut from the state budget.

They are gathering Thursday at a hotel in Annapolis.

Advocates will be urging lawmakers to restore cuts to wage increases for direct support staff who help the developmentally disabled live independently.

Don Rush

Governor Larry Hogan’s proposal for a 2 percent across the board cut for state agencies without any mention as to what should be slashed is being criticized by a top Maryland budget analyst.

Warren Deschenaux, director of the Office of Policy Analysis for the Department of Legislative Services, told a panel of lawmakers that he believes the lawmakers should know details.

He called the new governor’s approach “very dangerous.”

Maryland State Education Association

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - A Maryland teachers' union is launching a petition drive to protect strong investments in schools.

The Maryland State Education Association is kicking off a radio ad campaign and online petition drive on Monday. The ad will run for two weeks in Baltimore, the District of Columbia and other parts of Maryland.

The campaign is calling on Gov.-elect Larry Hogan and state lawmakers to not cut school funding.

all-free-download.com

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Budget cuts have prompted the Virginia Department of Forensic Science to reduce its analysis of gunshot residue and several other kinds of trace evidence.

Beginning Monday, the department is discontinuing routine analysis of trace evidence in what it calls general chemical cases, including cosmetics and unknown liquids or pastes. The agency also is limiting gunshot residue testing to evidence from the hands of suspects in cases where someone was shot.

official photo

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe is planning to lay off 565 state workers and raise the prices of distilled spirits at state-owned liquor stores as he aims to close a state budget shortfall.

McAuliffe detailed his plans Wednesday as part of an effort by state officials to bridge a $2.4 billion budget gap.

McAuliffe said most of the layoffs would come from the Department of Corrections, which will close multiple facilities. It also will delay the opening of a women's correctional center.

Don Rush

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Gov. Martin O'Malley plans to submit nearly $80 million in state budget cuts to the Board of Public Works.

The Washington Post (http://wapo.st/TC8YnK ) reports that O'Malley will ask the board to approve the cuts on Wednesday.

The reductions add up to about 0.5 percent of the planned $16.1 billion in general-fund spending in the current fiscal year, which began Tuesday. The newspaper reports that the cuts are an acknowledgement that tax revenues are not likely to be as strong as projected.

Don Rush

DOVER, Del. (AP) - Members of the Delaware legislature's budget writing committee will be getting back to work after the long holiday weekend as they continue to fashion a spending plan for the fiscal year starting July 1.

The Joint Finance Committee is set to reconvene Tuesday as members continue to work through a list of about $37 million in suggested changes to Gov. Jack Markell's proposed budget that administration officials developed amid recent steady revenue declines.

Don Rush

Delaware’s revenue forecasting panel says the state’s budget problems just got worse predicting that it will fall $75 million short of previous estimates.

The new projections by the non-partisan Delaware Economic and Financial Advisory Council means that the state’s governor and lawmakers may have to consider budget cuts as they head toward the June deadline.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that Governor Jack Markell is expected to put $20 million back into the general fund that agencies will not spend this year.

Share Our Strength

A final vote is expects today in the House of Representatives effort that would make major cuts in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program formerly known as food stamps critics say they could have a dramatic impact on hungry Marylanders.

Maryland News Connection reporter Allison Burns has the story:

        

U.S. Naval Academy

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - U.S. Naval Academy officials say federal budget cuts could lead to canceled classes.

Academy spokesman Cmdr. John Schofield tells WBAL-AM that the cuts will mean furlough days.

Schofield says civilian employees of the Department of Defense must take 11 furlough days between July 8 and Sept. 30, the end of the fiscal year. He says that will mean taking one day each week or two days per pay period as furlough days. About half of the faculty members at the school are civilian employees.

wboe website

Job cuts are coming to the Wicomico County Public Schools.

Six positions are in jeopardy including a teacher an instructional assistant and professional development coach.

That’s the message for more than 200 parents who signed a friendly petition protesting the proposed budget by Wicomico County Executive Rick Pollitt.

His spending plan cuts the county contribution to the public schools by over $2 million dollars from the $40 million requested by the Board of Education to $38 million for the upcoming fiscal year.

nps.gov

As the deadline looms for the $85 billion in automatic spending cuts from the sequester in Washington the First State could be hit hard.

Delaware gets almost $315 million in non-defense funds from the federal government.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that the state’s Office of Management and Budget believes there will be a 5.3 percent across-the-board cut.

nps.gov

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - A Wells Fargo report says Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia are the most vulnerable to looming and widespread federal budget cuts.

The report released Monday examines states that would feel the most pain from $85 billion in cuts that are set to automatically start taking effect March 1 without a bipartisan deal.

Pages