Arts

Shots - Health News
1:28 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Say What? French Horn Players Run Risk Of Hearing Loss

Stand back, or wear earplugs.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 2:52 pm

Loud music can lead to hearing loss. But it's not just rock musicians and their fans who are at risk.

In classical orchestras, horn players are particularly vulnerable to hearing damage from the tunes they and their colleagues play.

Some studies have found that horn players are blasted with some of the loudest sounds in the orchestra. The levels are so high that many countries' occupational health regulations would limit exposure like that to a half-hour a day, some studies have found.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:22 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

The Pianist Who Plays 'The Rascal And The Sparrow'

Antonio Pompa-Baldi's new album is a tribute to Francis Poulenc and Edith Piaf.
Steinway & Sons

How do you make a piano sing? Italian-born pianist Antonio Pompa-Baldi tackles the question on his new album, The Rascal and the Sparrow, a tribute to Francis Poulenc and Edith Piaf, two titans of French song who each died 50 years ago. Pompa-Baldi shared his thoughts on the project in this email chat with NPR Music's Tom Huizenga.

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The Record
12:02 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Vijay Iyer, Jeremy Denk Win MacArthur Genius Grants

Vijay Iyer and Jeremy Denk are 2013 MacArthur fellows.
Courtesy of the artist

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Deceptive Cadence
5:31 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Leonard Bernstein's Unconventional 'Anxiety'

Leonard Bernstein's Age of Anxiety symphony is as unconventional as its creator.
Courtesy of Library of Congress

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:30 pm

Like Leonard Bernstein himself, there is absolutely nothing predictable about the music he wrote. None of the three amazing works Bernstein labeled as "symphonies" in any way resemble a conventional orchestral symphony.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:52 am
Fri September 20, 2013

And 'Fiddler On The Roof' — Not Jewish

Pablo Helguera for NPR

This week's artune is ripped from the headlines. More controversy for Russia and its official position on homosexuality: A new government-funded film — and its government funders — deny that Tchaikovsky was gay.

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A Blog Supreme
7:46 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Opera Star Jessye Norman Picks Her Favorite Jazz Singers

In a conversation aired on WBGO, Jessye Norman credits the study of jazz with her understanding of song interpretation.
Carol Friedman Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 11:06 am

Jessye Norman's commanding soprano voice makes her the quintessential operatic diva for many listeners. But she frequently draws inspirations from jazz: She ranks singers like Billie Holiday, Mabel Mercer and Sarah Vaughan high on her list of influences.

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Arts
9:14 am
Thu September 19, 2013

John Wesley Wright

Tenor John Wesley Wright

It’s September, back to school, time for “What I did on summer vacation.”  Kara Dahl Russell interviews tenor and S.U.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:32 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

First Watch: Kronos Quartet Plays Music By The National's Bryce Dessner

Andrew Paynter Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 12:02 pm

When you hear the name of guitarist and composer Bryce Dessner, you wouldn't be wrong to think immediately of hugely acclaimed indie-rock outfit The National. But he's also a stalwart of the new music scene.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:03 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Mstislav Reaperpovich

Pablo Helguera for NPR

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, on Twitter @nprclassical, or on Facebook at NPR Classical.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:25 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Soundscapes In C, In Winter And In Alaska

An incredible roster of musicians gathered at Carnegie Hall in 2009 to play Terry Riley's epic 'In C' — with the complete, but only single-page, score projected overhead.
Julien Jourdes courtesy of Carnegie Hall Archive

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 1:58 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
5:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

New York City's 'People's Opera' May Face Its Final Curtain

Pamela Armstrong (left) as Alice Ford and Heather Johnson as Meg Page in New York City Opera's production of Falstaff. The so called people's opera may have to cancel its upcoming season if fundraising falls short.
Carol Rosegg New York City Opera

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 10:15 pm

There are a lot of operas that end with heroines on their deathbeds, singing one glorious aria before they die. That's what happens at the end of Anna Nicole, the controversial new work that New York City Opera is presenting at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in September. But the company's artistic director and general manager, George Steel, says it could also be City Opera's last gasp.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:46 pm
Sun September 8, 2013

Banjos, Bartók And La Belle Époque: New Classical Albums

Caleb Burhans debut album as a composer is called Evensong.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 12:34 pm

People ask why I thrive on classical music, and I tell them it's all about discovery. The possibilities for finding incredible music, both old and new, are endless as the oceans.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:03 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Music For The Bisontennial

Pablo Helguera for NPR

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 6:25 pm

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, on Twitter @nprclassical, or on Facebook at NPR Classical.

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Deceptive Cadence
9:49 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Watch A Late Composer's Parting Statement, Through The Eyes Of A Child

A still from the video for New York Polyphony's performance of Richard Rodney Bennett's "A Colloquy with God."
Courtesy of Mark DeChiazza

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 9:20 am

The vocal quartet New York Polyphony delights in surprises — whether it's a matter of singing some rather raunchy Italian madrigals or making a video to introduce their album Times Go By Turns (released on BIS Aug. 27).

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Deceptive Cadence
9:49 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Why Aren't Composers Writing More Symphonies Today?

Composer and clarinetist Derek Bermel.
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 10:34 am

At 8 years old, I scrawled my first and last Symphonies — nos. 1, 2, and 3 — on ruled notebook paper. They were short duets for clarinet and trumpet for myself and my brother to play. Why did I call them symphonies? I can't remember, but I suspect that it was a desire to tie these efforts — and me, by extension — to a grand and venerable tradition.

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Deceptive Cadence
8:03 am
Tue September 3, 2013

10 Easy Ways To Optimize Your Music Practice

To kick off the new school year, we have 10 ways to make practicing more effective and a happier experience.
iStock

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:27 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
12:03 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

The Academy Of St. Martin In The Red

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, on Twitter @nprclassical or on Facebook at NPR Classical.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:58 am
Fri August 30, 2013

When Symphony Boards Get Desperate

Pablo Helguera for NPR

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:04 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Finding Nature, Rage And Humor In Modern American Symphonies

The AIDS Memorial Quilt on display at the Washington Monument in October 1992. The AIDS crisis is the subject of John Corigliano's Symphony No. 1, "Of Rage And Remembrance."
AFP AFP/Getty Images

The symphony after World War II appeared to be headed for extinction as composers took divergent paths to experiment with musical language and forms. But the evidence of recent decades shows that the genre was never really on the verge of disappearing.

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Deceptive Cadence
9:12 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Singing And Sandwiches For A Tenor's Centennial

New York native Richard Tucker in the title role of Offenbach's The Tales Of Hoffmann.
Sedge LeBlang Metopolitan Opera Archives

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 10:21 am

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Deceptive Cadence
9:03 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Slimmed-Down Gramophone Awards Honor Home Team

The album cover for Dutilleux' Correspondances and other works, which won the Contemporary prize at the 2013 Gramophone Awards.
courtesy of Deutsche Grammophon

The British classical magazine Gramophone announced today the latest round of winners of its annual awards, now in their 90th year. With an expansive roll call of noteworthy albums ranging from early music to opera, the Gramophone Award honorees represent a tantalizing range of musical achievement — but it's a smaller array than in years past.

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Ecstatic Voices
12:03 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Atheists Take Old Hymns Out Of The Chapel And Into The Streets

The Renaissance Street Singers give a performance at the Winterdale Arch, near the West 81st Street gate in Central Park.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 10:16 am

On a recent Sunday afternoon, 15 members of the Renaissance Street Singers gathered under a bridge in New York's Central Park. With little fanfare, they launched into a free, two-hour concert of music by Palestrina, des Prez and other composers who lived more than 500 years ago.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:58 am
Fri August 23, 2013

His Voice? Muzak To Her Ears

Pablo Helguera for NPR

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

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Deceptive Cadence
7:23 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

Behind The Latest Round Of Bruised Feelings At The Minnesota Orchestra

The chairs are still empty in Minneapolis, but all sides in the Minnesota Orchestra dispute have been busy trying to snap up web domain names.
iStock

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 12:05 pm

In Minneapolis right now, even small matters have the potential to escalate — fast. Take the latest flashpoint in the Minnesota Orchestra's ongoing tribulations, which in about 24 hours has flared up a lot of ire in the classical community.

About a week ago, a semi-professional musician, blogger and longtime fan of the Minnesota Orchestra named Emily Hogstad was talking with some fellow Minnesota fans about the possibility of organizing a dedicated group of music lovers who want to see an end to the longstanding labor disputes at the Minneapolis-based ensemble.

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Field Recordings
9:05 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Daniel Hope's Earth And Sky Expedition

Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 2:09 pm

When Daniel Hope was a boy, the only thing he loved as much as his violin was his telescope. Gazing into the night sky, he pondered the vastness of space. Now a grown man, Hope still has a penchant for wonder and discovery — especially when it comes to music.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:15 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Symphonic For The People: The Mid-Century American Symphony

Composer Marc Blitzstein (left) with Leonard Bernstein studying the score of a Blitzstein work during a 1947 recording session.
W. Eugene Smith Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 7:28 am

Over the course of the 20th century, the symphony as a genre — originally an inheritance from Europe — increasingly became a transnational tradition, flowing across the Atlantic and back again.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:55 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Get High In Aspen

Pablo Helguera for NPR

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

Read more
Music Reviews
1:50 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Forgotten Quartet, Reissued And Reevaluated

A new collection of Brahms and Mozart recordings by the Stuyvesant Quartet from 1947 conveys a kind of inward grace.
Jay Shulman Courtesy of the artist

A movie last year called A Late Quartet told the traumatic story of what happens when a famous string quartet has to change personnel. But, in fact, most string quartets — like symphony orchestras, only more conspicuously — continually change players, because players retire, or die, or get more lucrative offers.

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Deceptive Cadence
9:54 am
Thu August 15, 2013

An American Maverick Turns The Symphony On Its Head

Charles Ives, better known as an insurance executive in his time, wrote innovative symphonies incorporating American folk and hymn tunes.
Corbis

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 12:22 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
5:07 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Why Is One Of The World's Top Violinists Judging Miss America?

Does this mean Josh Bell will start using "There She Is, Miss America" as an encore?
Louie Aguinaldo iStock

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