Arts

Deceptive Cadence
11:07 am
Tue June 12, 2012

Conducting Business: Crowdfunding Classical Music

Better than busking or writing endless grant applications? Raising funds via sites like Kickstarter.
iStock

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:47 pm

Dress shirts inspired by NASA technology, gourmet pepper mixes and ... a new recording and study guide for Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time? That's just a tiny sample of Kickstarter's current array of "creative projects" seeking funding. Forget writing endless grant applications and long dinners with angel investors, the thinking goes — just tap into your social networks to raise money instead.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue June 12, 2012

Alan Furst's New 'Mission' Delivers Spy Thrills

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:09 pm

Alan Furst is fixated on a place on the verge of all-out war — and his many readers are grateful for his obsession.

Furst is the wonderfully inventive author of a series of novels set in Europe on the eve of World War II. He's often been compared to John le Carre, Graham Greene and other masters of fictional espionage. But it's time to consider him on his own merits.

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Author Interviews
2:50 am
Tue June 12, 2012

What Animals Can Teach Humans About Healing

When wildfires swept across Australia in February 2009, this photo of a firefighter sharing his water with an injured koala captured hearts around the world. The koala later died — not of fire-related injuries, but of chlamydia. Koalas in Australia are suffering from an epidemic of chlamydia, says Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz. "There's no such thing as safe sex in the wild."
Mark Pardew AP

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:18 am

When Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz was asked to treat an exotic little monkey with heart failure at the Los Angeles Zoo, she learned that monkeys can suffer heart attacks from extreme stress — just like humans. That's when the cardiologist realized she'd never thought to look beyond her own species for insights into disease.

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The Salt
3:36 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Food Truck Lingo Might Be Just Around The Corner

Taking a sip of the official drink of the food truck movement, Mexican Coke
courtesy John T. Edge

New words and phrases and new uses for words we already know creep into our everyday language from the most unlikely places, much to the displeasure of our English teachers.

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Book Reviews
12:14 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Book Party For One: A Loner's Summer Survival Guide

Harriet Russell

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 4:48 pm

Summer is a season when people get hypersocial — with barbecues and neighborhood fairs, graduations and pool parties. In short, it's an especially trying time for those of us who'd rather stay indoors and read a book. My early summer reading list, therefore, takes the form of a loner's survival guide.

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Author Interviews
11:51 am
Mon June 11, 2012

Joan Rivers Hates You, Herself And Everyone Else

Joan Rivers says her material has only gotten stronger with age. "I always say, 'What are you going to do? Are you going to fire me? Been fired. Going to be bankrupt? Been bankrupt.'"
Courtesy of the author

Originally published on Wed December 26, 2012 12:18 pm

Joan Rivers doesn't hold anything back.

Over the course of her 50-year career, Rivers has made fun of her bankruptcy, her many facelifts, her husband's suicide and the sacrifices she made over the years as a female standup performer.

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Author Interviews
2:08 pm
Sun June 10, 2012

Bear Grylls on Family, Faith And Drinking Pee

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:31 am

Survivalist Bear Grylls has been an almost inescapable figure on the Discovery Channel for years.

His show Man vs. Wild has a global audience of millions and peaked as the highest-rated cable show in the U.S. But in March, Grylls and the Discovery Channel parted ways over a contract dispute.

He's currently taking some time away from television, developing ideas for a return, and spending time with his wife, Shara, and their three young sons, Jesse, Marmaduke and Huckleberry.

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Books
6:05 am
Sun June 10, 2012

Two Poems From The Nation's New Top Poet

English professor Natasha Trethewey was named the 19th U.S. poet laureate last week.
Jalissa Gray Creative Commons Image

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 6:14 pm

Natasha Trethewey is the newly announced, 19th U.S. poet laureate. The position is described by the Library of Congress as "the nation's official lightning rod for the poetic impulse of Americans."

Trethewey tells Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin that it's a lot of responsibility.

"Just trying to be the biggest promoter of poetry; someone who's really got to do the work of bringing poetry to the widest audience possible," she says.

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Books
6:04 am
Sun June 10, 2012

No One In 'The Red House' Gets Away Unscathed

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 12:50 pm

Ah, the family getaway. All of you together in one space — maybe a cabin in the mountains or a beach house. Delightful family meals, maybe some Scrabble. A time of togetherness and familial harmony.

That is decidedly not the kind of family vacation writer Mark Haddon draws inspiration from. In his latest novel, The Red House, Haddon peers inside the messy dynamics of a group of relatives, each grappling with their own fears and trying to make sense of themselves as a family, all while stuck in a vacation house in the remote English countryside.

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Books
6:03 am
Sun June 10, 2012

Audiobooks That'll Make The Family Road Trip Fly By

Chris Silas Neal

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 3:50 pm

It's time to rev up the old minivan and hit the road for summer vacation. One way to stave off those "are we there yet" questions is to get 'em hooked on an audiobook.

It just so happens that this is the season when there are a lot of new audiobooks to choose from. Last week, prizes for the best audiobooks of the year were announced at the annual Audie awards.

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Author Interviews
4:13 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Steve Guttenberg Writes His Own 'Bible'

Steve Guttenberg (left), Michael Winslow (center) and G.W. Bailey star in 1987's Police Academy 4: Citizens On Patrol, part of the film franchise launched by 1984's Police Academy.
Warner Bros./Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:41 pm

When Steve Guttenberg was 16, he went to see an agent about starting his acting career.

That agent told him: "You are the last guy I would pick to be a movie star."

Guttenberg decided to become an actor anyway.

The summer before he was supposed to start the University of Albany, he moved from Long Island to Los Angeles to try his luck. Once there, he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, he snuck onto the Paramount Studios lot, set up his own office, and started making phone calls to agents and producers.

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Author Interviews
6:10 am
Sat June 9, 2012

'Mission': Secrecy And Stardom On The Edge Of War

Mission to Paris book cover

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 10:58 am

Fredric Stahl is "the sympathetic lawyer, the kind aristocrat, the saintly husband, the comforting doctor, or the good lover." At least onscreen.

He's an American movie star, born in Vienna, and says "my dear" with a kind of dreamy, trans-European cosmopolitan allure that makes him seem "a warm man in a cold world." He's also the hero of Alan Furst's new novel, Mission to Paris, set in Furst's favorite locale: Europe on the brink of war.

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Author Interviews
2:03 am
Sat June 9, 2012

How 'The Queen Of British Ska' Wrestled With Race

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 7:44 am

The British ska-revival band The Selecter formed in the late 1970s, playing what can be described as rock fused with calypso and American jazz.

Much of what set the band apart was its charismatic lead singer, Pauline Black. As one of few women in a musical movement dominated by men, she was called "The Queen of British Ska."

That experience is one of many recounted in her new memoir, Black by Design, which has just been released in the U.S.

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Book Reviews
4:24 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Review: 'The Lower River'

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 12:35 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Paul Theroux has published more than a dozen works of nonfiction, mainly travel books, as well as more than two dozen novels. Our reviewer, Alan Cheuse, says Theroux's latest novel - it's called "The Lower River" - is a must read.

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Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
3:52 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of June 7, 2012

Mitchell Zuckoff's Lost in Shangri-La, a World War II rescue adventure, debuts at No. 9.

The Salt
3:52 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Food Truck Cookbook Tracks Best Meals Served On Wheels

The crew of Shindigs sets up shop in a parking lot in Birmingham.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

With recent news that even Paris has one, food trucks are certainly in vogue these days. In the U.S., they're now spreading from the hot scenes in Los Angeles and New York to smaller cities, like Milwaukee and Madison. Even school systems are jumping on the food truck bandwagon.

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NPR Bestseller List
3:44 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of June 7, 2012

Compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
3:26 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of June 7, 2012

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 3:55 pm

The Sense of an Ending, Julian Barnes' Booker Prize-winning look at self-delusion, debuts at No. 6.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
3:23 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of June 7, 2012

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 3:55 pm

Michelle Obama's diary of her White House garden, American Grown, debuts at No. 4.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
3:20 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of June 7, 2012

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 4:00 pm

The Yard, Alex Grecian's tale of early forensics and murder in Victorian London, debuts at No. 13.

Deceptive Cadence
3:09 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: June 8, 2012

The London Symphony Orchestra, performing for real at a free concert in Trafalgar Square last month.
LEON NEAL AFP/Getty Images
  • The London Symphony Orchestra, live at the Olympics opening ceremony? Yeah, not so much. The musicians will mime to a recording of themselves.
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Poetry
12:15 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Natasha Trethewey: 'Poetry's Always A Kind Of Faith'

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 1:39 pm

Portions of this interview were originally broadcast on July 16, 2007, Jan. 20, 2009 and Aug. 18, 2010.

This week, the Library of Congress announced that Natasha Trethewey, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Native Guard, will be the next poet laureate of the United States.

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Remembrances
12:15 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Ray Bradbury: 'It's Lack That Gives Us Inspiration'

"I'd like to come back every 50 years and see how we can use certain technological advantages to our advantage," said science-fiction author Ray Bradbury. He died Tuesday at age 91.
Steve Castillo AP

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 2:27 pm

This interview was originally broadcast in 1988.

Ray Bradbury didn't like negative people. The science-fiction writer and author of Fahrenheit 451 told Terry Gross in 1988 that he found out about negative people in fourth grade, shortly after his classmates started making fun of him for collecting Buck Rogers comic strips.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:58 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Introducing Siri Georg Solti

Pablo Helguera

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:47 pm

Got an idea for a classical cartoon, or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

Books
11:58 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Luke, I Am Your Father, Now Pick Up Your Toys

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 12:41 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Switching gears now, Father's Day is a little over a week away and we try to take the day to appreciate the dads in our lives, but if you think you had some tough times with your dad, you've got nothing on this famous film father and son.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STAR WARS: EPISODE V - THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK")

JAMES EARL JONES: (as Darth Vader) Obi Wan never told you what happened to your father.

MARK HAMILL: (as Luke Skywalker) He told me enough. He told me you killed him.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:17 am
Fri June 8, 2012

The Peril Of The Flying Violin

Recent revisions to British Airways' carry-on luggage rules can confuse travelers with musical instruments.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:50 pm

My two-week stay in Europe ended earlier this week with a stroke of luck: My German father-in-law gave me his beautiful old violin, the one he's played since he was 11. But getting it back safely to the U.S. was more of a problem than I imagined.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Right On The Money: A 'Capital' Book For Our Times

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

Lizzie Skurnick writes the "That Should Be a Word" column for the New York Times Magazine.

England has always reveled in its drawing-room dramas, from Jane Austen's social minefields to E.M. Forster's Howards End to Upstairs, Downstairs — and yes, the blockbuster Downton Abbey.

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Poetry
5:09 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

New U.S. Poet Laureate: A Southerner To The Core

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 5:54 pm

The United States named its 19th poet laureate today: Natasha Trethewey, a professor of English and creative writing at Emory University in Atlanta. She is the nation's first poet laureate to hail from the South since the initial laureate — Robert Penn Warren — was named by the Library of Congress in 1986.

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Asia
1:46 pm
Thu June 7, 2012

Bankrupt At Home, Philly Orchestra Looks To China

The Philadelphia Orchestra, which declared bankruptcy last year, has been performing in China, where it is looking to develop new streams of revenue.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 8:17 pm

The Philadelphia Orchestra has just wrapped up a 10-day visit to China, its seventh trip to the country over the past four decades.

But this trip was different.

The orchestra is preparing to come out of bankruptcy, and this tour was about its survival. It hopes to balance its books by building new audiences and new revenues in the world's second-largest economy.

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New In Paperback
8:21 am
Thu June 7, 2012

New In Paperback June 4-10

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 11:24 am

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Julian Barnes, Joan Didion and Sugar Ray Leonard.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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