Arts

Song Travels
5:44 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Joshua Bell And Jeremy Denk On 'Song Travels'

"I've thought to myself often listening to some classical works: 'I think I want to make a couple million dollars and turn that into a pop song,'" Joshua Bell (right) says, laughing. "There's a lot of untapped potential there."
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 3:21 pm

Together, violinist Joshua Bell and pianist Jeremy Denk make for one of the most dynamic duos in the classical music world. The two have been recording and performing together in the classical repertoire for almost a decade, and have become equally at home thumbing through the pages of the Great American Songbook.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:58 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Will Work For Feed

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon? Leave it in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

Deceptive Cadence
9:54 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Come Dance The 'Rite Of Spring' With Us!

It's fun to stay at the ИМКА: Stravinsky's ballet The Rite of Spring triggered an uproar at its world premiere in Paris a century ago. Now we're asking you to help celebrate the centennial by creating a dance of your own.
Keystone-France Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 11:17 am

  • Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring; Scriabin: The Poem of Ecstasy

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NPR @ LPR
3:09 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

An Evening With Nico Muhly, 'Two Boys' And Other Works

Ebru Yildiz for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 4:58 pm

Opera audiences are well acquainted with all manners of intrigue — whether political, romantic or psychological. The exciting American composer Nico Muhly is updating that paradigm to the 21st century with his opera Two Boys.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:20 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

Moms In Opera: Women On The Edge

Mozart's Queen of the Night (portrayed here by soprano Diana Damrau), in his The Magic Flute, is one of opera's more intense mothers.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 3:40 pm

We love mothers for all the Hallmark reasons: for their compassion and patience, not to mention giving birth. But some moms aren't exactly greeting card friendly — and none less so than those who live in the opera house.

This is opera, after all, so we expect the outrageous. But operatic moms seem to be disproportionately portrayed as murderers, harpies or generally women on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Your Normas, Medeas, Butterflies, Queens of the Night and Clytemnestras.

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Classics in Concert
6:40 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Spring For Music: National Symphony Orchestra At Carnegie Hall

Conductor Christoph Eschenbach and the National Symphony Orchestra gave the final performance in this year's Spring for Music Festival at Carnegie Hall on May 11, 2013. The program was of all 20th-century Russian music: Shchedrin's Slava, Slava; Schnittke's Viola Concerto; and Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony.
Torsten Kjellstrand for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:17 am

Program:

  • SHCHEDRIN: Slava, Slava
  • SCHNITTKE: Viola Concerto
  • SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 5

  • National Symphony Orchestra
  • Christoph Eschenbach, music director
  • David Aaron Carpenter, viola
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Deceptive Cadence
1:45 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Do You Have To Nearly Kill Yourself To Become A Classical Musician?

Pianist James Rhodes.
Dave Brown courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 2:49 pm

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Live in Concert
10:57 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Olafur Arnalds, Live In Concert

NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:25 am

How can music be happy and sad at the same time? Listen to Olafur Arnalds and you'll hear it. Depending on your mood, the tone changes, and a song that may have been uplifting one day sounds like an elegy the next. It's spacious, undeniably beautiful work. Much of the music performed in this concert, recorded on April 18 at (Le) Poisson Rouge in New York City, is drawn from the Icelandic musician's recent album For Now I Am Winter.

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Tiny Desk Concerts
2:03 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

Nicola Benedetti: Tiny Desk Concert

Nicola Benedetti performs a Tiny Desk Concert in February 2013.
Marie McGrory Marie McGrory/NPR

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 6:33 pm

You might never tell by her youth or her warm and approachable demeanor, but 26-year-old Scottish violinist Nicola Benedetti has already had an extraordinary career. Mentored by Yehudi Menuhin starting at age 10, Benedetti won the BBC Young Musician of the Year Award a decade ago — and, really, that was just a warm-up.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:55 am
Fri May 3, 2013

The Chrome Depot

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work atArtworld Salon and on his own site.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:03 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

What Do You Get Valery Gergiev For His 60th Birthday?

Conductor Valery Gergiev, who turns 60 today.
Marco Borggreve courtesy of the artist

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Deceptive Cadence
5:51 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Coaxing The Baby To Sleep: A Violinist's Hand-Picked Lullabies

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine says she had her infant daughter in mind when she decided to record an album of lullabies.
Andrew Eccles Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:48 pm

In German, it's wiegenlied; in French, berceuse; in Norwegian, vuggevise. In any language, the universal effect of what we know as the lullaby is, of course, to coax a baby to sleep.

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine had her own baby in mind when she decided to record a collection of lullabies. Her infant daughter appears on the cover of the new album Violin Lullabies — all folded up, fast asleep, so tiny she just about fits in her dad's hands.

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Classics in Concert
11:22 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Spring For Music: Detroit Symphony Orchestra At Carnegie Hall

Leonard Slatkin leads the Detroit Symphony Orchestra at the Spring for Music festival at Carnegie Hall.
Torsten Kjellstrand for NPR

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 4:34 pm

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra's performances at the 2013 Spring for Music festival represent a dramatic reversal of fortunes, and one that can only happen among modern-day American orchestras.

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Music Documentaries
12:23 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Tristan Perich On Q2 Music's 'Spaces'

courtesy of Q2

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:48 am

For the third installment of Q2 Spaces, we visited the home and work space of Tristan Perich — a New York-based sound, visual and installation artist whose music blends a composer's interest in acoustic classical instruments and electronic manipulation with an inventor's exploration into circuitry and computer code.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:39 pm
Mon April 29, 2013

Remembering Janos Starker, The Cellist 'Born To Be A Teacher'

Cellist Janos Starker with one of his classes at Indiana University. He said he was "put on this earth to be a teacher."
Indiana University Jacobs School of Music

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 5:48 pm

Renowned concert soloist and prolific, Grammy-winning cellist Janos Starker died Sunday. He was 88.

Starker's career began in his native Hungary, where he entered the Budapest Academy at age 7 and made his solo debut four years later. Starker dedicated his life to music, and left a legacy of teaching and performing.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:48 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

Madame Mao's Hollywood Fantasies

A Chinese and a North Korean embrace in a pledge of everlasting (political) love. From Raid on the White Tiger Regiment, 1971.
Zhang Yaxin Courtesy of the see+ Gallery, Beijing, and the Stephen Bulger Gallery, Toronto.

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 4:56 pm

During the chaos and oppression of China's Cultural Revolution, one curious new theatrical genre was born — and it was the child of the Communist Party. Jiang Qing (a.ka. Madame Mao), a former stage and screen actress and the notorious wife of Mao Zedong, led the creation of yang ban xi: "model works" that were meant, in words attributed to Chairman Mao, to "serve the interests of the workers, peasants, and soldiers and [conforming] to proletarian ideology."

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Deceptive Cadence
11:54 am
Fri April 26, 2013

The Ultimate Soloist

Pablo Helguera

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 11:55 am

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work atArtworld Salon and on his own site.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:44 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Music We Love Now: Three Must-Hear Piano Albums

Ingolf Wunder pays tribute to 300 years of keyboard music on his new album 300.
Patrick Walter

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:22 pm

The young Austrian pianist Ingolf Wunder shines in Mozart, Jorge Federico Osorio reintroduces an intoxicating Mexican concerto and Elisveta Blumina reveals the gentle side of Ukrainian composer Valentin Silvestrov.

Deceptive Cadence
5:22 am
Sat April 20, 2013

A Moment With Pulitzer-Winning Composer Caroline Shaw

Caroline Shaw, who composed the piece Partita for 8 Voices for her vocal group Roomful of Teeth, is the youngest-ever recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for music.
Dashon Burton Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 1:57 pm

How do you write something like Partita for 8 Voices, the a cappella vocal piece that is this year's winner of the Pulitzer Prize for music?

"Very late at night," says the composer, Caroline Shaw, speaking with NPR's Scott Simon. "Sometimes it comes from having a sound in your head that you really want to hear, that you've never heard before, and struggling to make that sound happen in any way you can."

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Deceptive Cadence
11:53 am
Fri April 19, 2013

The Art Of The Centri-Fugue

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work atArtworld Salon and on his own site.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
3:09 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

How Do You Handle Loneliness On The Road?

In her latest video message, opera star Joyce DiDonato ponders the art of loneliness on the road.
Nicholas Heavican

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 3:30 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
3:09 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

The Conductor Who Gained Power By Giving It Up

Colin Davis found power in humility later in his career — and one astonished music journalist.
Alberto Venzago

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Music Documentaries
10:13 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Morton Subotnick And Joan La Barbara On Q2 Music's 'Spaces'

Morton Subotnick in his studio.
WQXR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:56 am

It's difficult to overstate Morton Subotnick and Joan La Barbara's contributions to contemporary music.

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Classics in Concert
3:43 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Carnegie Hall Live: Dresden Staatskapelle Plays Bruckner

The Dresden Staatskapelle's principal conductor, Christian Thielemann, asserts that Anton Bruckner's music, in its long-winding search for beauty, is the perfect antidote for modern life. He and the orchestra brought Bruckner's Symphony No. 8 to Carnegie Hall on April 19, 2013.
Melanie Burford for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 9:04 am

Anton Bruckner divides audiences. For admirers, his sprawling, stately symphonies — with their great pauses and timeless repetitions — represent the summit of the 19th-century Viennese symphonic tradition. For skeptics, the symphonies are exercises in lumpy piety, plagued with bombastic sonorities and numbingly long-winded development sections.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:07 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Appreciating A Pillar Of The Chicago Sound: Trumpeter Bud Herseth

The late trumpeter Bud Herseth, former principal player for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra for over 50 years.
Jim Steere courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 10:06 am

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Deceptive Cadence
6:09 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Caroline Shaw, 30, Wins Pulitzer For Music

Caroline Shaw, winner of this year's music Pulitzer, performing with the ACME ensemble in New York in September 2012.
AJ Wilhelm for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 6:16 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
4:57 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Remembering Colin Davis, A Conductor Beloved Late In Life

The late Colin Davis conducting the last night of Proms at London's Royal Albert Hall in September 1968.
George Freston Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:59 am

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Deceptive Cadence
11:47 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Maria Callas On The Move: A Diva Does D.C.

A diva on the town finds her way to NPR's new headquarters.
Anya Grundmann NPR

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:02 pm

As one door closes, another opens. Last week, we shut down operations at our old Washington, D.C, headquarters; today, we walked into a brand-new building.

Making the move wasn't easy. In 14 years, I'd acquired an impressive amount of stuff, from LPs autographed by Placido Domingo and Tom Jones to books like The Essential Guide to Dutch Music. And did I really need three staple removers?

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Deceptive Cadence
2:03 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Extreme Drama: The Life And Music Of Richard Wagner

Rudolph Cronau's drawing of Wagner's opera house, Bayreuth, flanked by his birthplace (left) and place of death.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 10:11 am

Richard Wagner was, and still is today, arguably the most controversial figure in classical music. A self-appointed deity and hyperdriven genius, Wagner is often considered the ultimate megalomaniac. He dreamed up and achieved a single-minded plan to change the course of classical music history.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:53 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Portrait Of The Heldentenor As A Young Man

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work atArtworld Salon and on his own site.

Read more

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