Arts

Arts and culture

It was the lawsuit that rocked Silicon Valley.

In 2012, tech investor Ellen Pao sued her employer, the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers, for gender bias. She accused her bosses of not promoting her because she was a woman — and then retaliating against her when she complained.

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Last night's Emmys had the usual song and dance plus a dose of politics. From the opening monologue to a cameo by former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer, the political mood even extended to the biggest winner of the night.

"The School for Good and Evil" isn't just a fantasy novel series for middle-grade readers.

It's a low-key empire.

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Salisbury University's Cultural Calendar week of September 25th, 2017

Awards shows often mirror current events, from politically pointed acceptance speeches to winners whose subject matter feels especially relevant in the moment. The 69th Emmy Awards, held Sunday night, didn't skimp on either, as The Handmaid's Tale, Saturday Night Live and Veep posted strong — even dominant — showings over the course of the night.

Updated 1:25a.m. ET

The 2017 Emmy Awards were broadcast Sunday night on CBS. Below is the list of nominees and winners. (Winners are in bold italics.)

Outstanding comedy series

  • "Atlanta" (FX)
  • "Black-ish" (ABC)
  • "Master of None" (Netflix)
  • "Modern Family" (ABC)
  • "Silicon Valley" (HBO)
  • "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" (Netflix)
  • "Veep" (HBO)

The new film Crown Heights begins in the spring of 1980, with a single gunshot ringing out on a Brooklyn street corner. But the film is less a whodunit than a chronicle of the personal nightmares that killing set in motion. Colin Warner, an 18-year-old immigrant from Trinidad, was wrongfully convicted of the murder. The film tells the story of his two-decade imprisonment, and the friend who worked tirelessly to finally get him out.

We Shall Not Be Moved is a new opera that takes its name from both the old spiritual-turned-civil-rights anthem and the Philadelphia black liberation group, MOVE. That group might be best-remembered for a 1985 tragedy: A police helicopter bombed the MOVE house, and the resulting fire killed 11 people and destroyed 62 homes in the neighborhood.

The opera, presented by Opera Philadelphia with the Apollo Theater, had its world premiere Sept. 16. It revisits that house and its ghosts, while remaining centered on stories about young people in Philadelphia today.

As a storyteller, Nathan Englander has always excelled at showing the cracks and fissures in insular groups that seem, to the outsider, homogenous: Orthodox Jews, Holocaust victims, even other writers (one of the most fractious tribes in existence). In a singular example from the short story "What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank," a survivor, upon meeting a man whose number indicates he was three people ahead in line when they were tattooed, irritably calls his fellow sufferer a "cutter."

As a member of the generation that has been blamed for ruining everything from dinner to retirement, I am relieved to discover that it will soon all be someone else's fault. Though this comes at the cost of Death creeping ever closer, sinking the blade of his scythe into the edge of my avocado toast, I'll take what reprieve I can get.

At 87, Dolores Huerta is a living civil rights icon. She has spent most of her life as a political activist, fighting for better working conditions for farmworkers and the rights of the downtrodden, a firm believer in the power of political organizing to effect change.

In 1968 — the middle of the Cold War — the Soviet submarine K-129 disappeared, taking with it its 98-member crew, three nuclear ballistic missiles and a tempting treasure trove of Soviet secrets. Without the technology to retrieve it from the ocean floor, the Soviet Union left it there. It was considered lost — until the CIA stepped in.

Josh Dean's new book, The Taking of K-129, tells the true story of Project Azorian, a secret CIA mission to lift the submarine from a depth of more than 3 miles into a custom-built ship called the Hughes Glomar Explorer.

Charlie Bucket, the hero of Roald Dahl's famous children's book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which also inspired two films and a British confectionery company, was originally written to be a "little black boy," according to an interview with Felicity Dahl, the author's widow.

She spoke earlier this week on BBC Radio 4's Today program, alongside Roald Dahl biographer Donald Sturrock, who said it was the writer's agent "who thought it was a bad idea" and had the author turn the protagonist white.

Amal El-Mohtar is the Hugo Award-winning author of The Honey Month and the editor of Goblin Fruit, an online poetry magazine.

Lily Meyer works at Politics & Prose Bookstore in Washington, D.C.

I'm a book reviewer. Most of the time, it's not my job to write about politics. But it would be impossible to write about Lauren Markham's The Far Away Brothers without writing about our political moment — or, if not impossible, both cowardly and pointless, since the project of The Far Away Brothers is a political one.

Ask Luis Garza how the La Raza exhibition came to be at The Autry Museum of the American West, and he raises his palms, eyes heavenward:

"Karma," he says. "Fate. Serendipity. The gods have chosen to align us at this moment in time."

Pop some popcorn, prep the Emmy-themed snacks (For The Crown: Cucumber sandwiches! For The Handmaid's Tale: Gruel! For The Feud: Bette and Joan: Thick slices of ham!

Actor Harry Dean Stanton was cast in supporting roles for decades, and his weather-beaten face became a fixture on-screen for more than a half-century. With leading roles in the 1980s films Repo Man and Paris, Texas, he became something of a star and a cult favorite. His agent says Stanton died Friday of natural causes in Los Angeles. He was 91.

When the word "bodega" began to trend all over Twitter this week, I wondered whether something bad had happened in one those beloved, big-city neighborhood corner stores.

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Cray Crayola

Sep 15, 2017

We pick the brightest crayon in the box with this final round in which every answer is also the color of a Crayola crayon. It's "bittersweet," which also happens to be a very nice shade of orange.

Heard On Julia Stiles: Antihero Of The 'Riviera'

Mystery Guest

Sep 15, 2017

This episode's mystery guest, Emily Perina, teaches an unusual class for women. Can you solve the mystery before Jonathan and Ophira do?

Heard On Julia Stiles: Antihero Of The 'Riviera'

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Talking Heads

Sep 15, 2017

TV pundits in absurdly large suits star in this music game. We rewrote Talking Heads songs to be about the hosts, pundits, and game show sidekicks who make their living as talking heads.

Heard On Julia Stiles: Antihero Of The 'Riviera'

Shocking Surprise

Sep 15, 2017

This game has a major twist ending: Jonathan's been dead this whole time and Ophira's his father! In this game, we collected movies with surprise endings and gave them a twist of our own by adding one letter to their titles.

Heard On Julia Stiles: Antihero Of The 'Riviera'

The Sounds Of Failure

Sep 15, 2017

In this round, our contestants succeed by failing as they're quizzed on the sounds you hear when you lose or die in various games.

Heard On Julia Stiles: Antihero Of The 'Riviera'

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The Instagram Of Dorian Gray

Sep 15, 2017

What would've happened if Dr. Jekyll used Grindr and wondered why Mr. Hyde was always zero feet away? In this game, we've solved the core plot issues in classic works of fiction using modern solutions.

Heard On Julia Stiles: Antihero Of The 'Riviera'

Don't read this.

I'm serious.

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