Arts

Arts and culture

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

As we mourn the golf great Arnold Palmer, we acknowledge another contribution he made to our culture: the tasty and refreshing iced tea and lemonade beverage that carries his name.

A pointy-headed professor. A hand-painted heron. A steel fist rising in the air. These are all works of American art, of a sort — but you can't go to a museum to see them. You go to your local bar or craft brewery.

They're examples of beer tap handles, a business that's expanded in tandem with the explosion of growth in the craft beer industry. As craft brewers try to make their brews stand out in an increasingly crowded field, they're driving the expansion of a singular business: custom-made snazzy beer taps.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Dave Davies, in for Terry Gross.

The chuga-chuga sound is one any dairyman would want to hear — daily. It's the sound of milking machines collecting the white liquid, which is turned into edible products that support their farm.

For Greg and Ana Kelly, the chuga-chuga sound means fresh milk from their flock of 80 milking ewes — milk to be made into cheeses and caramel at their Gallant, Ala., sheep farm, named Dayspring Dairy.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Many Americans are familiar with the astronaut heroes of the 20th century space race — names like Gus Grissom and Neil Armstrong. But who did the calculations that would successfully land these men on the moon?

Several of the NASA researchers who made space flight possible were women. Among them were black women who played critical roles in the aeronautics industry even as Jim Crow was alive and well.

For those of us who grew up in Santa Fe, N.M., there are few figures that loom larger than Zozobra. I mean that literally, as much as figuratively: The 50-foot-tall marionette is as familiar as Santa Claus — only, instead of stealing away with cookies and milk, Zozobra ends its holiday each year by being ritualistically burned to death before a crowd of tens of thousands of screaming people.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Studs Terkel had a gift for connecting with people and collecting their stories.

Some of those oral histories of everyday workers talking about their jobs became a bestselling book published in 1974 called Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do.

The thing with Crooked Kingdom is you have to decide whether or not you buy Kaz Brekker.

Sharing Pairing

Sep 23, 2016

In this final round, every answer is a rhyming pair of words. The second word is created by changing the first letter of the first word. For example, if we said, "a non-competitive race for charity," you'd answer, "Fun Run."

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Sep 23, 2016

Natasha Lyonne premiered three movies in two weeks--Yoga Hosers, a Kevin Smith comedy/horror film about two girls who fight Canadian Nazis in the form of sausages; Antibirth, a horror farce about a party girl who finds herself pregnant with a demon after a crazy night; and Intervention, about a group of friends who come together to give a couple a marriage intervention. "That's my genre," she told host Ophira Eisenberg, of the off-beat projects she's been involved in.

Mr. Mojo Risin'

Sep 23, 2016

Strap in, everybody, because it's time for ANAGRAMS ON THE RADIO! We decided to inject a little rock-n-roll into our anagram game by adding the most famous anagrammed name in rock — Mr. Mojo Risin', the anagram for The Doors' lead singer Jim Morrison. The answer we're looking for is an anagram of the last word you hear. It's like we're giving you the answers!

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Something, James Something

Sep 23, 2016

"Joyce. James Joyce." That's how you'd respond to Jonathan Coulton singing about the author of Finnegan's Wake. We rewrote James Bond movie themes to be about other famous people named James. Score a bonus point by identifying the Bond theme!

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Mystery Guest

Sep 23, 2016

Ophira and Jonathan become the contestants in a round of Mystery Guest! Tim League owns a business that he's bringing to New York City. Ophira and Jonathan must figure out what Tim's business is by asking yes-or-no questions.

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Herb, My Little Pony, Or Enya Song?

Sep 23, 2016

In this edition of This, That or the Other, contestants must guess: is it a culinary herb, a My Little Pony character, or an Enya song?

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A Film Lover's Travel Guide

Sep 23, 2016

Jonathan and Ophira read entries from a travel guide; all you have to do is figure out what city they're describing. Easy enough, except that this travel guide was written by someone who never left their home, and only researched the cities by watching movies.

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

[In case you haven't heard, Pop Culture Happy Hour is embarking on a West Coast tour! San Francisco, Seattle and Los Angeles are sold out — though we recently added an appearance (with Guy Branum!) at the Now Hear This podcast festival in Anaheim on Oct. 29 — but we'll also be in Portland on Oct. 19 with our dear pal Audie Cornish.

In 1948, Atlanta added eight black men to its police force. This was at a time when, as author Thomas Mullen explains, a 1947 Newsweek article "estimated that one-quarter of Atlanta policemen were, in fact, members of the Ku Klux Klan."

Those pioneer police officers were the inspiration for Mullen's new novel, Darktown — a blend of history, mystery and violence that explores racial tensions in post-World War II Atlanta.

The Amazon series Transparent is about a transgender woman named Maura who for decades was known to her kids as Mort, or Dad. Actor Jeffrey Tambor plays Maura and has just won a second Emmy for his performance. "When those roles come along, you don't run away," he tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "It's a perfect role, you know? I thought I was gonna do Lear, but I'm gonna do Maura."

Even 60 years ago, there were westerns that interrogated the genre's veneration of masculinity and might-for-right.

The Magnificent Seven wasn't one of them.

If the idea of a group of women in pristine haute couture dresses milling about the dirt and grime of an Australian backwater burg makes you giggle, you may be the target audience for The Dressmaker, a perplexing Down Under oddity in which a woman uses her talents for crafting top-line designer wear to exact revenge on her childhood home. The woman is played by Kate Winslet, who is a delight—the Oscar winner rarely takes on comedic roles, and she brings an almost frightening enthusiasm to the part.

Back in 1988, Indian-American director Mira Nair burst onto the scene with her debut feature Salaam Bombay!, a ground-level portrait of Bombay street kids that brought the qualities of Italian neorealism — and its key successors, like Satyajit Ray's "Apu Trilogy" — to a nascent American independent scene. With her new film Queen of Katwe, Nair comes full circle, at least in the sense that she's again addressing the perils of extreme poverty and the resilient children who withstand it.

In the 1960s, Choi Eun Hee and Shin Sang Ok were South Korean cinema's first couple. She was a movie star, he was an acclaimed director, and life with their two young children was considered glamorous. Then things got complicated.

Shin had two kids with a younger actress, and his financially struggling production company was shuttered by the government. He and Choi divorced, and in 1978 the actress vanished. Later the same year, Shin also disappeared.

Earlier this year the New York-based filmmaker Oren Rudavsky released (with Joseph Dorman) Colliding Dreams, a fair-minded history of the Zionist ideal. The film documented the tension between Zionism as both a response to the mass persecution of Jews, and a catalyst for endless bloody conflict between Israeli Jews and Palestinians who fled or were expelled from their homes in the 1948 Israeli-Arab War, when Israel declared independence.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Tomorrow, two final works from composer James Horner will reach American ears: a concert piece being released on CD, and his score for the remake of the Western adventure The Magnificent Seven. The composer died a little more than a year ago in a plane crash, after creating more than 100 film scores over nearly 40 years.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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This is FRESH AIR.

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