Army Corp of Engineers

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NORFOLK, Va. (AP) - Some Chesapeake Bay beaches will be getting more sand later this year.

The Virginian-Pilot reports the $18.4 million federal government project is part of funding earmarked following the 2012 Hurricane Sandy disaster. Norfolk's share in the project is $5.5 million.

Norfolk assistant city engineer Chuck Joyner says that while the goal of the Ocean View beach project is storm protection, the additional sand will provide more room for beachgoers.

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A new report by the Army Corps of Engineers is warning state and coastal residents that they need to rethink their policies involving the coastline in the wake of Superstorm Sandy.

For Delaware, the report says, there are two high risk areas.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that these include the shoreline of the Delaware River and Bay as well as the resort areas of the Inland Bays.

During Superstorm Sandy the worst flood damage occurred on the bay sides of Fenwick Island, South Bethany Beach, Bethany Beach and Dewey Beach following the hurricane.

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The popular channel near Hoopers Island finds the Dorchester County Council struggling to get it dredged.

The channel has not been cleaned up in the last four years.

Council president Jay Newcomb tells WBOC that the Army Corp of Engineers has cut back on the general maintenance of the channel.

He adds there is no specific project that would result in clearing up the waterway and no funding for dredging.

The Army Corp of Engineers also told the television station that while they recognize the importance of dredging the channel there was no money for it now.

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DOVER, Del. (AP) - Environmental groups want the state to hold a public hearing on a plan to restore and protect Delaware River shoreline at docks near Delaware City.

Delaware Sierra Club and Delaware Audubon said in a letter to state environmental regulators that PBF Energy's plan could attract birds near an area they say is at risk for oil spills.

PBF's plan for its docks at its Delaware City refinery includes refilling shoreline and replacing nearly 1,000 5-foot high wave dampeners. Pilings would be driven to anchor oil spill containment booms.

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LEWES, Del. (AP) - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has awarded a $63 million contract to deepen a 17-mile stretch of the Delaware Bay shipping channel off Sussex County.

The News Journal reports the contract was awarded to Weeks Marine Inc. of New Jersey after its original $70 million bid was reduced. Its bid was the lowest of four submitted. All were in excess of the Army Corps' estimate of $52 million for the project.

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$10.5 million has been awarded by the Army Corp of Engineers  to beef up the sand and dunes along NASA’s Wallops Island Flight Facility on the Virginia Eastern Shore.

The project calls for restoring 650-thousand cubic yards of sand along the shoreline of the launch center.

Hurricane Sandy destroyed sand, dunes and berm along the barrier island.

Bill Wrobel, director of the Wallops Flight Facility, told the Salisbury Daily Times that the project is absolutely vital to protect the more than $1 billion worth of assets.

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Dekeevis Johnson fell to his death yesterday from the Roth Bridge on Delaware Route 1.

And that has led the Army Corp of Engineers to look at what kind of change is needed to prevent such a tragedy.

The problem is that the bridge is not designed to handle pedestrians.

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Delaware surfers and the Army Corps of Engineers are clashing over the impact of beach replenishment on the waves.

It involves a narrow strip of Indian River Inlet whose floor sloped gradually with sandbars that could produce waves.

But these days Mason Contruction Company is set to pump 400-thousand cubic yards of sand from the Inlet to widen the beach.

Jamie Young, manager of East of Maui in Dewey Beach, told the Wilmington News Journal that the shallower beaches give the surfer more time to catch the wave and ride it in.

The Army Corps of Engineers will be on the sand in Rehoboth Beach until at least mid-September to ensure storm water outfall pipes are unclogged despite completion of their shore replenishment project.

There have been few storms this season since completion of shore replenishment.

Ensuring the outfall pipes will help protect local businesses and homes near the boardwalk by transporting storm water from the street to the ocean.