The World

Weekdays at 3

"PRI's The World®" is your world revealed. It's about the events, trends, and personal tales that connect us around the globe. Marco Werman hosts an hour of surprising angles, unexpected insights, and engaging voices to illuminate what's going on in the world, and why it matters to you.

Reporters and editors for "PRI's The World®" seek voices of people around the globe to reveal what's happening and why. Bringing this new global journalism to the United States, The World's unique editorial perspective brings energy and passion to each day's broadcast. The goal: to take us beyond borders and boundaries, and fire up our curiosity about a fascinating, messy, contentious and beautiful planet. It's about exploration and risk, war and peace, fun and folly, and how our daily drama plays out around the globe.

A lot of jokes start with the line “a man walks into a bar.” But in Canada, it’s a case of “a bar runs into a man.” Only this is no joke.

The bar Morrissey House in London, Ontario, has become the center of a gender discrimination complaint from an area man.

The man — who has not been named — complained to Morrissey House owner Mark Serre after the pub launched a new promotion.

The promotion offers a 13 percent discount on food to women on Monday nights. No discounts are allowed on alcohol in Ontario.

What do the North Koreans want?

Jan 10, 2018

They met, they talked, they issued a joint statement. And they will meet again. 

This is no small matter for North and South Korea, two countries that remain technically at war and whose peninsula in northeast Asia has been cause for global anxiety in recent months. 

The war of words between the North’s baby-faced dictator Kim Jong-un and the US's quick-tweeting President Donald Trump has raised the specter of a possible military confrontation that could conceivably include the use of nuclear weapons. 

The official announcement landed early Monday morning. Vanessa Velasco received a 7 a.m. text from a friend, also from El Salvador. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will end a program that has allowed Velasco and her husband, her friend, and more than 200,000 Salvadoran immigrants to work and live in the US without fear of deportation.

Velasco was not surprised. Neither was her husband.

Less than two weeks from now, the federal government could shut down unless Congress can pass a spending bill. But the status of undocumented immigrants brought to the US as children has once again become a point of contention.

Ronyde Christina Ponthieux's smile widens as her father, Rony, gives her a nod of approval. The 10-year-old proudly rattles off a list of interesting facts about the United States's unique connection to Haiti but isn't sure if she correctly remembers the number of Haitian soldiers who fought in the Revolutionary War.

His nod is all the confirmation she needs.

"I knew I was right," she giggles excitedly. "It's 477!"

R
Carlos Barria (United States Conflict Politics Society)/Reuters

More than 58,000 Haitians who stayed in the United States with a special protected status since a catastrophic 2010 earthquake will be allowed to stay another six months, the Department of Homeland Security said Monday.

Mexico City residents are forced to cope with bad air

Jan 9, 2018
m
Edgard Garrido/Reuters

Mexico City is in the grips of a pollution crisis.

Authorities have issued the first smog alerts for the city in more than a decade and recently implemented restrictions on when cars can be on the road. On Wednesday, for example, two-in-five cars were ordered off the road, because the pollution reached such high levels.

In the next few months, you may see a new phrase on the labels of some foods at the grocery story: “produced with genetic engineering.”

These disclaimers have been mandated in dozens of countries for years, but until now they’ve been voluntary in the US.

Now, a state law in tiny Vermont is causing many large food companies to label GMO-containing products nationwide.

Local law pushed through by grassroots support

The Vermont GMO labeling law was pushed through thanks, in large part, to grassroots activism by people like Will Allen.

F
Adeline Sire

French gastronomy may evoke thoughts of butter, cream, duck fat, hollandaise and fancy pastries — in other words, rich, fatty food that will fill your belly.

But French cuisine has had a makeover over the past years and that is due in no small part to the Earth’s changing climate.

In fact, many restaurants now have on their menu dishes that have been deemed “Good for the climate.”

François Pasteau has run his small gourmet restaurant l’Épi Dupin in Paris for 20 years. I met him in his kitchen as he was stirring a fragrant soup.

Mosul Dam could be scarier than ISIS

Jan 9, 2018
C
Azad Lashkari/Reuters

Amina Mohammed has lived in the village of Wana on the banks of the Tigris River her whole life. She was here during the years of Saddam Hussein and the US war. She’s even lived under ISIS.

“They surprised us one afternoon,” she says, recalling the day ISIS swept into Wana in 2014. “They just entered the village.”

Early last year, Kurdish Peshmerga fighters pushed ISIS out of Wana with the help of US airstrikes.

But a potentially bigger threat looms just six miles upstream — the deteriorating Mosul Dam, which is holding back billions of cubic meters of water.

Pages