World Cafe

Weeknights 7-9PM

Hosted by radio veteran and music enthusiast David Dye, World Cafe presents up to ten hours each week of new and significant music and the artists who create it.

Serving up a blend of blues, rock, world, folk, and alternative country, live performances, and intimate interviews, the two-hour daily program is produced by WXPN-FM in Philadelphia.

WXPN in Philadelphia is hosting its own music festival this weekend, and you can watch many of the acts live on VuHaus, public radio's new music discovery platform.

Saturday's Webcast Schedule

  • Kississippi - 12 p.m. ET
  • Ben Arnold - 12:30 p.m. ET
  • Esme Patterson - 1:05 p.m. ET
  • The Revivalists - 1:45 p.m. ET
  • Darlingside - 2:35 p.m. ET
  • The Felice Brothers - 3:20 p.m. ET
  • The Record Company - 4:10 p.m. ET

John Doe of X was World Cafe's guest earlier this week, as he played live with a rock band that included original X drummer DJ Bonebrake. You can hear it again in the World Cafe archive. Doe also discussed the early days of the L.A. punk scene to which X belonged.

Esmé Patterson On World Cafe

19 hours ago

Originally from Colorado and part of the same singer-songwriter scene that gave us Nathaniel Rateliff, Esmé Patterson was initially part of the folk band Paper Bird with her sister. Patterson has increasingly let loose her inner rocker on each new solo album — particularly on her third record, released this past June, titled We Were Wild.

WXPN in Philadelphia is hosting its own music festival this weekend, and you can watch many of the acts live on VuHaus, public radio's new music discovery platform.

Friday's Webcast Schedule

  • Rosemary Fiki - 4 p.m. ET
  • Queen Of Jeans - 4:35 p.m. ET
  • Billy Hector - 5:05 p.m. ET
  • White Denim - 5:45 p.m. ET
  • Father John Misty - 6:30 p.m. ET
  • The Suffers - 7:30 p.m. ET
  • Shawn Colvin & Steve Earle - 8:20 p.m. ET

Robert Elllis On World Cafe

Jul 20, 2016

Singer-songwriter Robert Ellis released his self-titled fourth album earlier this year. A gorgeous, stylistically diverse roots-country record whose songs are made more real by the human characters in his lyrics, the album was chosen by the NPR Music staff as one of 2016's best so far.

Birds Of Chicago On World Cafe

Jul 19, 2016

Birds Of Chicago's JT Nero and Allison Russell have been making what they call "secular gospel" records together since 2012. Before that, the now-married couple had worked with other bands — including, in Russell's case, the Canadian roots-music group Po' Girl. The duo's new album, Real Midnight, was produced by Joe Henry.

In this session for World Cafe, Russell and Nero perform songs from the new record and discuss touring as a young family.

World Cafe Next: Pinegrove

Jul 18, 2016

The thoughtful New Jersey indie-rock band Pinegrove is the featured artist on this week's installment of World Cafe: Next. The group features singer-guitarist Evan Stephens Hall, as well as brothers Jack and Nick Levine on drums and guitar, respectively.

Pinegrove's new album, Cardinal, is its sixth — and first since the release of a mixtape in 2010. Hear two of its songs as part of this segment, using the audio link above.

John Doe On World Cafe

Jul 18, 2016

John Doe has been a founding member of the L.A. punk band X, a solo artist, an actor, a member of the folk-rock band The Knitters, and now the author of a new memoir about the early days of L.A. punk, titled Under The Big Black Sun. Doe also has a new album out, titled The Westerner, on which he performs a song with his former wife and fellow X founder, Exene Cervenka.

This week, World Cafe rebroadcasts some of its best sessions from the last several months. Listen in for some conversations and performances that garnered a lot of interest when they originally aired. You'll hear from up-and-comers, such as the gritty blues-rock trio The Record Company, as well as veteran musicians like Lucinda Williams.

Frightened Rabbit On World Cafe

Jul 8, 2016

Upon hearing Frightened Rabbit's 2008 album Midnight Organ Fight, it was easy to fall in love with songwriter and lead singer Scott Hutchison's self-deprecating everyman persona. Still, the U.S. hadn't fully embraced the Glasgow band until its most recent album, Painting Of A Panic Attack, released earlier this year.

Author Bob Mehr has written the biography of The Replacements that fans have been awaiting for a long time. For Trouble Boys: The True Story Of The Replacements, he talked with band members, insiders and family members and got the whole story of the Minneapolis band whose disastrous, drunken shows are almost as revered as the transcendent ones.

Seratones On World Cafe

Jul 7, 2016

Shreveport, La.'s Seratones are proof that the governing spirit of punk rock is alive and well in the 21st century. Lead singer A. J. Haynes says that she'd been struggling to sound like Ella Fitzgerald and other jazz vocalists before she met up with the musicians who became Seratones. With them, she found to her great joy that blues-infused punk came much more naturally. Hear the band, which released its debut album in May, perform live in the World Cafe studio.

Heron Oblivion On World Cafe

Jul 6, 2016

Heron Oblivion, which released its self-titled debut album in March, unites former members of loud psychedelic bands from the San Francisco Bay area (Comets On Fire, Sic Alps) with drummer and singer Meg Baird, who comes from an East Coast folk background.

Darrell Scott On World Cafe

Jul 5, 2016

One of Nashville's most in-demand session musicians and songwriters, Darrell Scott has played a wide variety of instruments on countless sessions and recently toured with Robert Plant and Band of Joy. He's also written hit songs for the Dixie Chicks, Faith Hill and others — all while maintaining his own solo career.

Latin Roots: New Cuban Music

Jun 30, 2016

Reporter Catalina Maria Johnson of Chicago's Beat Latino recently returned from Cuba very excited about some new music. She traveled all the way across the island, from Havana to Santiago de Cuba, for the Manana festival, which is dedicated to combining traditional music with electronics. Johnson brought back some great examples of that blend in songs by DJ Jigüe and La Dame Blanche. Check out more in our Spotify playlist.

Hinds On World Cafe

Jun 30, 2016

The Spanish band Hinds has cut a giddy swath across the U.S., proving once and for all that rock music is supposed to be fun. The four women from Madrid play a deceptively loose brand of garage rock that's captured on their international debut, Leave Me Alone, released this past January. In this session, find out about how they keep it lighthearted on the road and hear a high-energy set. Check out "Garden" in the video below.

Hayes Carll On World Cafe

Jun 29, 2016

Hayes Carll's new album Lovers And Leavers defies the expectations of those who might have seen him as a next-generation Jerry Jeff Walker, writing songs of drunken missteps and failed romance. In comparison with some of Carll's earlier work, Lovers And Leavers, produced by Joe Henry, is downright mature. Recent experiences in Carll's life — like divorce and raising his son — inform his new songs, which work as well live as they do with Henry's studio band.

Marlon Williams On World Cafe

Jun 28, 2016

New Zealand's Marlon Williams sings what has been categorized as country music, although he claims a wide range of influences. In the little town of Lyttelton, where he grew up, he relied on his father's record collection; albums by Gram Parsons particularly captivated him.

Williams' otherworldly, pure voice is well suited to play with gender roles in song. Don't miss the video of him performing "When I Was A Young Girl," once sung by Nina Simone, in the World Cafe studio.

World Cafe Next: Whitney

Jun 27, 2016

Fans of the Chicago band Smith Westerns might hear something they recognize in the music of Whitney, a new band led by Smith Westerns guitarist Max Kakacek and drummer Julien Ehrlich. The two say "Whitney" is actually the name of the persona they envisioned performing the music they wrote for their debut album, Light Upon The Lake.

The writing rooms of Nashville aren't always magical places. Though many top-notch creative minds meet in those Music Row offices to pen country hits, the marketplace demands that they produce highly average material for stars seeking to dominate the radios inside American SUVs. Every so often, though, a truly original voice emerges from within Nashville's workaday milieu. Brent Cobb is one.

A distinct American voice is gone. The bluegrass and old-time singer Ralph Stanley died Thursday at age 89. He lived a rich, full life of music; singing with his brother Carter as The Stanley Brothers, he helped define the bluegrass sound from the 1940s onward. After Carter Stanley died in 1966, Ralph continued playing with The Clinch Mountain Boys.

Neil Young On World Cafe

Jun 24, 2016

Every time Neil Young joins World Cafe, he seems to have a different project he's excited about — and it's not always a new album. He's been telling us about his PONO digital music player and download service for a while, and he returns to that topic in today's conversation.

C.W. Stoneking On World Cafe

Jun 23, 2016

Blues singer-songwriter C.W. Stoneking is touring the U.S. for the first time this summer, but he's been well known in Australia for over 20 years. His last record, Gon' Boogaloo, even earned him a ARIA Award (the Australian equivalent of a Grammy) for Best Blues and Roots Album.

Mary Chapin Carpenter On World Cafe

Jun 22, 2016

The Things That We Are Made Of is Mary Chapin Carpenter's superb new album. It captures a specific and relatable stage in life — a characteristic of Carpenter's music throughout 14 albums (which have earned her five Grammys and two CMA Awards).

Bob Boilen is the man behind NPR's All Songs Considered and the Tiny Desk concert series, which takes place at his desk. Needless to say, he's always in search of new music; last year alone, he saw more than 400 bands live.

For every country star and insurgent new sensation, Nashville boasts a dozen musicians who've perfected their art over many years. Tomi Lunsford is one such exceptional, undersung talent. She hails from a prestigious family — her great-uncle was the revered folklorist and songwriter Bascom Lamar Lunsford, and her father, fiddler Jim Lunsford, played with the likes of Roy Acuff and Bob Wills. Tomi herself began singing professionally as a teen with Jim and her harmonizing sisters.

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