World Cafe

Weeknights 7-9PM

Hosted by radio veteran and music enthusiast Talia Schlanger , World Cafe presents up to ten hours each week of new and significant music and the artists who create it.

Serving up a blend of blues, rock, world, folk, and alternative country, live performances, and intimate interviews, the two-hour daily program is produced by WXPN-FM in Philadelphia.

Gregg Allman On World Cafe

2 hours ago

Editor's Note: Gregg Allman died May 27, 2017, at the age of 69. He's remembered by the music world as a founding member of the Allman Brothers Band and one of the pioneers of Southern rock. We revisit Allman's last visit to World Cafe in 2011, when he performed songs from his seventh solo studio album, Low Country Blues.

Pokey LaFarge joins World Cafe to perform new songs from his latest album, Manic Revelations. LaFarge lives in St. Louis, right near Ferguson, Mo., which he says inspired his song "Riot In The Streets." He puts it this way:

Listening to Pinegrove's music gives you that warm feeling of spending time with old friends — familiar, nostalgic and endearingly rough around the edges. And although its 2016 album Cardinal got a lot of love from critics, Pinegrove is a young band that still practices in the basement of one member's parents' house in Montclair, N.J.

Mac DeMarco On World Cafe

May 24, 2017

Mac DeMarco is just turning 27, but his new album, This Old Dog, seems to represent a more mature persona than he's projected in the past. Originally from Edmonton, Alberta, DeMarco has always been known for bringing the party — and then taking it over the top. But when his father (with whom he's had a difficult relationship for most of his life) became ill, DeMarco wrote the more sober "My Old Man" for him, thinking he was not going to recover.

World Cafe has a pair of brothers and a pair of cousins — plus one — in the studio today. Together, they're Melbourne's Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever. In this session, we chat about the band's Cinderella story: It went from late-night bedroom jams to signing a record deal with its dream label, Sub Pop.

Joshua James' new album is called My Spirit Sister. Released a little over a decade into his career, it features staggering honesty — the kind of stuff that's difficult to say out loud, let alone sing. For example, James wrote the song "Millie" when his wife was pregnant with their second child and he was having severe doubts. "I really just had no idea how to cope with it," James says. "Should I just leave this gal with her mom and just depart and try to start again? What am I to do?"

Beginning at 7 p.m. ET on Friday, May 19, watch Benjamin Booker, Hurray for the Riff Raff, Robert Cray and more perform during the final night of public radio's Non-Comm 2017. The show streams live via VuHaus from World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

Find Friday evening's full schedule below; all set times are shown in Eastern time and are subject to change.

Friday, May 19

7 p.m. — Holly Macve

7:30 p.m. — The Growlers

Beginning Friday, May 19, at 12 p.m. ET, watch a live stream of the jazz-influenced British singer ALA.NI at noon, followed by former Late Show bandleader Paul Shaffer and his group, The World's Most Dangerous Band. They're performing as part of this year's Non-Comm convention, currently underway at World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

The show streams live via VuHaus; find approximate set times (in Eastern) below.

Goldfrapp's new album, Silver Eye, is visceral dance music — an album you feel in your body before you process in your brain. The band is Alison Goldfrapp and Will Gregory, who've been musical partners for the better part of two decades. Their debut, Felt Mountain, came out in 2000. It's lush and well-loved, and it was a real breakout for the U.K. duo. In the years since, Goldfrapp has put out a handful of records, and each one sounds a little different.

Beginning at 7 p.m. ET on Thursday, May 18, watch Laura Marling, The Mavericks, Real Estate and more perform during the second night of public radio's Non-Comm 2017. The show streams live via VuHaus from World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

Find Thursday evening's full schedule below; all set times are shown in Eastern time and are subject to change.

Thursday, May 18

7 p.m. — Kyle Craft

7:30 p.m. — Baskery

Beginning Thursday, May 18, at 12:00 p.m. ET, watch a live stream of the sassy vaudeville duo Nancy And Beth (better known as actors Megan Mullally and Stephanie Hunt) and the pioneering alt-rock band Pixies. They perform as part of this year's Non-Comm convention, held at World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

The show streams live via VuHaus; find approximate set times (listed in Eastern time) below.

Josh Tillman, a.k.a. Father John Misty, joins World Cafe to chat and to perform songs from his new album, Pure Comedy. In this session we talk about Tillman's childhood: He spent his formative years at a Pentecostal school, where he was regularly told there were demons inside of him that needed to be exorcised — a process Tillman says is strangely relaxing.

Beginning at 7 p.m. ET on Wednesday, May 17 you can see Ani DiFranco, Blondie, Chicano Batman and more perform during the first night of public radio's Non-Comm 2017. The show will stream live via VuHaus from World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

Find Wednesday's full schedule below; all set times are shown in Eastern time and are subject to change.

Wednesday, May 17

7 p.m. — The National Reserve

7:30 p.m. — Brent Cobb

You hear a lot of different types of music on World Cafe, but you may not have ever heard anything like Tanya Tagaq, who has collaborated with Björk and won Canada's prestigious Polaris Music Prize.

This week, Philadelphia's WXPN and World Cafe Live play host to the NON-COMMvention, an annual gathering of noncommercial music radio station staffers and industry pros. The highlight: three evenings full of performances by some of public radio's favorite artists. This year's featured performers include Ani DiFranco, Blondie, Chicano Batman, Pixies, Laura Marling, Benjamin Booker, Real Estate, Hurray For The Riff Raff and more.

In this session, Delta Spirit frontman Matthew Logan Vasquez and his touring band perform songs from his second solo album, Does What He Wants. The new album was recorded in a trailer in Dripping Springs, Texas, during a difficult time for Vasquez. Last year, after running into financial problems, Vasquez, his wife and their infant son moved in with his mother so that the family could get a fresh start.

Angaleena Presley tells it like it is. The Kentucky native first gained national attention as one-third of the Pistol Annies, the groundbreaking country trio that also included Miranda Lambert and Ashley Monroe.

As the old adage goes, "you never get a second chance to make a first impression." Fifty years ago — May 12, 1967 — the Jimi Hendrix Experience made about as tremendous a first impression as it gets. The band's first full-length record, Are You Experienced?, is widely considered one of the greatest debuts in rock and roll. It introduced audiences to pyrotechnic psychedelia, amps that were at once incendiary and melodic and an artist that would define the dreams of nearly anyone who picked up a guitar for years to come.

You might have seen Maggie Rogers wowing Pharrell Williams in a viral video that captures the time she played him her song "Alaska" during a master class at NYU. In the video, as "Alaska" plays, you can see Pharrell is feeling it — and when the song ends, he gives Rogers his feedback: "Wow. I have zero, zero, zero notes for that. And I'll tell you why.

We're going dancing in this Latin Roots session with M.A.K.U SoundSystem. It's an eight-piece band based in New York City, but most of its members are originally from Colombia. Going on its seventh year as a band, M.A.K.U SoundSystem has independently released two full-length albums and one EP and toured across the U.S.

Jesse Hale Moore is based in Philadelphia, where he got a leg up on his debut solo record from two members of local favorite sons The War on Drugs — bass player Dave Hartley did some producing early on, and drummer Charlie Hall plays in this session.

The nominations are in for the 16th annual Americana Awards, to be held Sept. 13 in Nashville as the signature event of AmericanaFest — and in at least one category, they tell a tale of how this progressive yet traditionalist community is rising to the political challenges of a complicated historical moment. Four of the five releases in the Album of the Year category have protest at their core, demonstrating how the genre is stretching itself even as it builds on long-established artistic family ties.

In this session, we welcome Nancy And Beth — but those aren't their real names. It's the moniker for the punky vaudeville singing act fronted by two actresses: Stephanie Hunt, who got her start on NBC's hit show Friday Night Lights, and Megan Mullally of Will and Grace. Mullally played the memorable Karen Walker, a high-strung, alcoholic, conservative socialite.

At this moment in the music industry, the regular model for releasing a record has been pretty much blown apart. Artists can release singles or EPs online at any time, in whatever format. That can have some pretty interesting results, as it did for Hanni El Khatib.

The New Pornographers just released its seventh album, Whiteout Conditions -- and it's power-pop harmony heaven. This is music that moves your body and your brain, a hybrid that chief songwriter AC Newman says he envisioned from the beginning:

Ruby Amanfu is a treasured member of Nashville's creative community and a star on the rise. Born in Ghana, she moved with her family to Nashville when she was 3; her musical gifts emerged soon after.

Here at the World Cafe studios, we have a bunch of different microphones for artists to use when they come in to perform. The other day, our senior producer, Kimberly Junod, pulled out one that had been used a couple weeks ago — and it was covered in face paint, lipstick and glitter. She showed it to the rest of us and said, "Give you one guess who used this last."

In this session, we welcome Holly Macve from the U.K. She was born in Galway, in western Ireland, but moved to Yorkshire as a child. There, she lived with her grandparents, who influenced the title of her debut record, Golden Eagle -- a nickname for her grandfather, who was a classical composer.

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