World Cafe

Weeknights 7-9PM

Hosted by radio veteran and music enthusiast David Dye, World Cafe presents up to ten hours each week of new and significant music and the artists who create it.

Serving up a blend of blues, rock, world, folk, and alternative country, live performances, and intimate interviews, the two-hour daily program is produced by WXPN-FM in Philadelphia.

Hear three sessions recorded during World Cafe's yearly visit to the Camp Stage at the Philadelphia Folk Festival. This year's event, the 55th annual installment of the festival, took place Aug. 18-21, 2016.

Liz Longley

In October 2014, World Cafe ventured to Lafayette, La., with a camera crew under the direction of filmmaker Robert Mugge, who would turn the trip into the documentary Zydeco Crossroads.

Jon Cleary On World Cafe

Sep 27, 2016

If you've seen Bonnie Raitt live, chances are you saw Jon Cleary at the piano. Cleary's New Orleans-style playing has been a part of Raitt's show for years, and he continues to be a beloved fixture of the Crescent City.

World Cafe Next: Brent Cobb

Sep 26, 2016

Brent Cobb is from rural Georgia, but he's been paying the bills as a songwriter in Nashville for the last 10 years. These days, he's an overnight sensation with a major-label debut produced by his cousin Dave Cobb.

Kyle Craft On World Cafe

Sep 26, 2016

Kyle Craft's music encompasses a diverse set of influences. Originally from Shreveport, La., his voice carries southern cadences and his songs revolve around distinct characters and situations that could only be from that town by the Mississippi. But you also hear the influences of David Bowie, under whose spell Craft fell at a young age, and of Craft's adopted hometown of Portland, Ore.

The long, hot summer comes to an end today — according to the calendar, at least — and here at World Cafe, we're beginning to get into the spirit of the changing seasons. Feeling the autumnal vibes, we've selected some of our favorite songs that reflect the transition to the cooler days of fall.

Listen below for season-appropriate songs by Joanna Newsom, Simon & Garfunkel, Yo La Tengo and more.

Dawes On World Cafe

Sep 16, 2016

The California band Dawes has released several albums of breezy Golden State guitar rock centered on Taylor Goldsmith's emotionally loaded songs. Those songs are filled with statements that are irresistibly uplifting when heard in a crowd. (Think "anyone that's making anything new only breaks something else" from "When My Time Comes.")

River Whyless On World Cafe

Sep 14, 2016

The North Carolina band River Whyless is made up of four virtuoso musicians: Ryan O'Keefe, Halli Anderson, Alex McWalters and Daniel Shearin. What makes them — and their new album, We All The Light -- so special is how the four talents work together. For instance, in making the new album, they say they'd often write separate sections of music individually and craft them into one new song together.

Billy Bragg And Joe Henry On World Cafe

Sep 13, 2016

Billy Bragg and Joe Henry recorded much of their new album, Shine A Light: Field Recordings From The Great American Railroad, during a four-day rail trip, stopping to use the natural acoustics at train stations across the country.

World Cafe Next: Middle Kids

Sep 12, 2016

Middle Kids, a three-piece band from Sydney, Australia, is just starting out — but, as you'll hear from its first two singles, it's already come quite a long way. Lead singer Hannah Joy's voice has the emotional range to carry these fine, accomplished songs. Listen in the player above and get in on the ground floor with Middle Kids before the band releases its first EP later this fall.

Joseph On World Cafe

Sep 12, 2016

Don't let the name fool you: The Portland, Ore., band Joseph is a trio of sisters, none of whom are called Joseph. They're actually Allison, Meegan and Natalie Closner, who named their band after the Oregon town where their grandfather Jo once lived. Natalie was the Closner sister responsible for the group's formation; after she'd begun writing and performing, she realized how much more powerful the music could be with the addition of her siblings' voices.

The story goes that when he was 16 years old, Bob Weir met Jerry Garcia, and the Grateful Dead's long, strange trip began. Now, with the forthcoming release of Blue Mountain, Weir's first new solo album since 1978's Heaven Helps The Fool, comes a little pre-Dead history.

Local Natives On World Cafe

Sep 9, 2016

Those who have followed Local Natives since the release of its debut, Gorilla Manor, in 2009 --- or for even longer, since the band had formed in Los Angeles years earlier — can't help but notice how the band has constantly toyed with its sound. For its second album, 2013's Hummingbird, Local Natives switched things up by working with producer Aaron Dessner of The National.

Latin Roots: Céu

Sep 8, 2016

The Brazilian artist Céu started off studying classical music before discovering the beauty of Brazilian guitar music. Now, the singer from São Paulo has turned to electronics on her latest album, Tropix, whose title hints at her intent to blend tropical music with synths and loops. São Paulo is a vibrant musical center, and Céu discusses the opportunities that living there has given her in this interview.

The Head And The Heart On World Cafe

Sep 7, 2016

The Seattle band The Head and the Heart had major success with its second album, Let's Be Still, which came out on Sub Pop in 2013. Its folk-pop sound, superior harmonies and fine writing struck a chord with audiences and sent the band on the road for over a year.

Frankie Lee On World Cafe

Sep 6, 2016

Minneapolis country-folk singer Frankie Lee's debut album, American Dreamer, came out in the U.K. last year and was just released here in the U.S. His father, also a musician, died when Lee was 12. Lee inherited his dad's albums, some of his instruments and his friends, who guided the young singer in his love of music. He traveled to Austin, Nashville and Los Angeles and lived in each city for a while before returning to the Twin Cities, where he went back to his family's farming roots before delving deep into music.

World Cafe Next: LVL UP

Sep 5, 2016

The New York band LVL UP, whose four members met at SUNY Purchase, makes propulsive, experimental indie rock that sounds a little like Dinosaur Jr. with more pop melodies. The band is getting ready to release its third album, Return To Love, which comes out Sept. 23 on Sub Pop Records. LVL UP's two guitarists, Mike Caridi and Dave Benton, lead the way as the songs get louder and denser and turn unexpected corners. Hear two tracks at the audio link above.

Amos Lee On World Cafe

Sep 5, 2016

Singer-songwriter Amos Lee started singing at open mics in Philadelphia, and since then his career has grown onto ever-larger stages across the globe. Now, for the first time, Lee has produced one of his own albums. It's called Spirit, and it brings to the forefront the R&B qualities his fluid voice has always exhibited.

Okkervil River On World Cafe

Sep 2, 2016

The new Okkervil River album Away features a number of songs written very quickly by Will Sheff during sessions in the Catskills last year. He was in a period of transition: Several members of Okkervil River left the band during this time, and he also lost his beloved grandfather.

Caveman On World Cafe

Aug 31, 2016

Like so many indie-rock bands nowadays seem to be, Caveman is from Brooklyn. What's a bit more surprising is that its five members are actually from Brooklyn — born and raised. The band formed in 2010, with Matt Iwanusa at the helm, and has just released its third album, Otero War. The record, which took Caveman six years to write, is an open-ended concept album whose songs nevertheless stand well on their own. Hear some of those songs performed live for World Cafe in this session.

Oh Pep! On World Cafe

Aug 30, 2016

The Melbourne duo Oh Pep! combines the talent of Olivia Hally and Pepita Emmerichs. (You guessed it: The band's name is a derivative of both of theirs.) The two met in music school, where they studied classical music — but they shared a love of pop, and they found their work together was far superior to their solo projects.

World Cafe Next: Julia Jacklin

Aug 29, 2016

Julia Jacklin's debut album, Don't Let The Kids Win, showcases the lyrical density of her songs. The Australian singer-songwriter treats her music as an outlet for emotions that weren't discussed much in her family as she was growing up — she finds it easier to deal with those personal stories by putting them into songs. Jacklin, who's 25, has said Don't Let The Kids Win captures her nostalgia for the ambition she had when she was younger. Hear two songs at the audio link above.

Lisa Hannigan On World Cafe

Aug 29, 2016

One of the beautiful surprises in the Irish singer-songwriter Damien Rice's 2002 album O was the introduction of singer Lisa Hannigan, who has one of the most direct, simple and arresting voices you'll ever hear. After singing with Rice for several years, Hannigan flexed her own songwriting muscles and released her solo debut, Sea Sew, in 2008.

This week, World Cafe rebroadcast a 2011 session with The Civil Wars. When we recorded that session, Joy Williams and John Paul White had just released their album Barton Hollow; they'd go on to win four Grammy awards, achieve a gold record and play sold-out concerts. But the duo's success wasn't enough to sustain their partnership, which fell apart in 2014.

Here are 10 more great duos that, unfortunately, weren't built to last.

Hard Working Americans On World Cafe

Aug 26, 2016

Todd Snider has proven himself an agile (and very funny) solo performer, but in 2013 he decided he wanted to start performing in a band. So, he persuaded some friends, including bassist Dave Schools of Widespread Panic and guitarist Neal Casal of Ryan Adams' backing band The Cardinals, to form Hard Working Americans. (Snider jokes that he no longer even has to bring a guitar to gigs.)

Latin Roots: Chicano Activism

Aug 25, 2016

Catalina Maria Johnson, the host and producer of Beat Latino, visits World Cafe to discuss the music associated with the Chicano Power movement of the 1960s, including songs by activist and folk singer Agustín Lira. In some ways, she says, this music has become the oral history of the time.

Beth Orton On World Cafe

Aug 24, 2016

When Beth Orton released her debut album, Trailer Park, in 1996, critics dubbed her music "folktronica" for its use of acoustic instruments, singer-songwriter vibe and electronic beats. Whatever it was called, the songwriting and performance were sensational. Orton has experimented with her music through the years, leaning in her recent albums toward the acoustic side — but her newest record, Kidsticks, finds her mostly abandoning acoustic instruments for electronic keyboards and loops.

BADBADNOTGOOD On World Cafe

Aug 23, 2016

The Toronto improvisational band BADBADNOTGOOD recently released its fourth album, IV. The instrumental group includes Matthew Tavares on keys, Chester Hansen on bass, Leland Whitty on saxophone and Alexander Sowinski on drums. The four, most of whom met at Humber College, have become known for their jazz-inflected covers of hip-hop songs and, notably, for their collaborations with Tyler, the Creator.

Public-radio music curators know that a great remedy for the late-summer blues is fall's deluge of new releases. In this month's mix, hear new songs by L.A. art-rock favorite Warpaint, soulful newcomer Ethan Burns, Chicago rapper Noname and more, including a premiere from North Dakota folksinger Tom Brosseau.

World Cafe Next: Young Gun Silver Fox

Aug 22, 2016

Young Gun Silver Fox is a hard-to-resist duo. One member (singer-songwriter Andy Platts) is from California, while the other (multi-instrumentalist Shawn Lee) hails from London; fittingly, the duo's debut is called West End Coast.

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