The World

Weekdays at 3

"PRI's The World®" is your world revealed. It's about the events, trends, and personal tales that connect us around the globe. Marco Werman hosts an hour of surprising angles, unexpected insights, and engaging voices to illuminate what's going on in the world, and why it matters to you.

Reporters and editors for "PRI's The World®" seek voices of people around the globe to reveal what's happening and why. Bringing this new global journalism to the United States, The World's unique editorial perspective brings energy and passion to each day's broadcast. The goal: to take us beyond borders and boundaries, and fire up our curiosity about a fascinating, messy, contentious and beautiful planet. It's about exploration and risk, war and peace, fun and folly, and how our daily drama plays out around the globe.

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Brenna Daldorph

It’s mid-morning on election day and the voters waiting to cast their ballot inside Kamiti Maximum Security Prison sit in white plastic chairs in neat rows under the shade of two white tents.

There’s even entertainment: DJ Oxygen — an inmate who doubles as the prison’s resident DJ — is busy spinning a playlist full of bongo love songs. Poised behind his turntables, Oxygen manages to make his mandatory orange sweater and striped trousers look like a fashion statement— especially when paired with his big, gaudy, purple-and-gold rings.

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Iván Alvarado/Reuters

The Constitutional Court of Chile made an historic move this week, easing the country's total ban on abortion.

Chile is one of seven countries in the world that forbid abortion under all circumstances. The others are Honduras, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Vatican City and Malta.

The new regulations allow abortion under three circumstances: if there is pregnancy through a rape, if the mother’s life is at risk or if the fetus is not expected to survive pregnancy.

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Joshua Roberts/Reuters

Pakistanis are not happy with President Donald Trump's remarks on his Afghanistan policy. Trump singled out Pakistan for sheltering terror groups and destabilizing the region. He also threatened to cut US aid and to make an alliance with Pakistan's mortal enemy, India.

The US has long expressed its concerns privately, but Trump is the first president to openly put Pakistan on the spot.

When life gives you too much rain, make beer with it

8 hours ago

We've all heard the expression, “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” That's kind of what Joris Hoebe did.

His city, Amsterdam, has two problems.

First, the city loves beer and can’t seem to stop coming up with new brews.

Second, Amsterdam is 2 meters below sea level, so it floods easily. That means it has a problem with big rains.

Hoebe’s idea was to tackle the two challenges together.

A hobby brewer himself, Hoebe was working up some homebrew one evening when it started pouring outside.

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Tiziana Rinaldi/PRI

He’s walking on the edge of an abyssal, black lake, painfully aware of what lies beneath the water. Ominous waves keep crashing ashore, reaching for him.

That’s how Ravi Ragbir sees the trauma that engulfs his long and scarring deportation battle. It didn’t spare his mental health: sudden spasms of sadness, his chest closing up, tears choking his throat, his heart racing. They’re all signs that he’s getting too close to the lake — the imaginary place where he confines his suffering.

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Akintunde Akinleye/Reuters

People in West African countries speak hundreds of languages — more than 520 are spoken in Nigeria alone. A lingua franca is a necessity for day-to-day life.

That's where Pidgin comes in. Millions of people speak this informal language, a constantly evolving mix of English and local languages, as a way to overcome language barriers in the region. 

Awestruck viewers watch total eclipse sweep across US

11 hours ago
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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Whoops, cheers and cries of astonishment swept across the country today as the first total solar eclipse in nearly 40 years was seen from the United States.

“That was the most extraordinary experience. I was flabbergasted,” said John Llewellyn of Boise, who watched the eclipse in Cascade, Idaho.

“We always assume the sun is going to be shining, and suddenly the sun is gone. ... I can understand how the ancients thought that it had been eaten by a great space monster.”

How do you judge a child soldier?

12 hours ago

No one seems to remember what the boy’s real name was. But his cousin, Lily Atong, remembers him well.

When she talks about him, she gets a distant, wistful look in her eyes.

They grew up together, here in this village in northern Uganda. The boy was chubby, she says with a smile.

He would wake up early in the morning, clean and go tend the garden. He made her delicious, roasted sweet potatoes. And he was funny too — he’d tell stories that made everyone double over in laughter.

There wasn’t much to laugh about back then.

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Lucas Jackson/Reuters

President Donald Trump will unveil his strategy for Afghanistan on Monday, putting his mark on America's longest war in his first formal address to the nation since becoming commander in chief. 

Having repeatedly pledged to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan after 16 frustrating years of conflict, Trump looks set to ease his opposition and heed calls from his top generals for the United States to stay the course in his evening speech.

President Donald Trump has been trying to unravel a lot of President Barack Obama’s legacy. That now includes dismantling a small part of Washington, DC's growing bike-sharing program. A bicycle dock was placed inside the White House grounds in 2010, but the Trump administration had it removed last week

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Courtesy of Guy Consolmagno 

If you ask Guy Consolmagno, science and religion are two things that go together quite nicely. Brother Guy, as he’s known, is a Jesuit priest from Ohio. He’s also the director of the Vatican Observatory based in Rome.

We talked with Consolmagno ahead of his trip to Hopkinsville, Kentucky — the town sits smack-dab in the path of totality and has adopted the nickname Eclipseville — where he planned to watch his first-ever total solar eclipse. Brother Guy had a conversation with The World’s religion correspondent, Matthew Bell.

Why did ISIS target Spain? The answer may lie in history.

Aug 21, 2017
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Sergio Perez

On Thursday, a van ran over pedestrians on Barcelona’s Las Ramblas strip. It took a very short time for ISIS to claim responsibility for the attack.

At least 13 people died and around 100 people were injured.

But why did ISIS target Spain, now, for practically the first time? 

Related: See all the terrorist attacks around the world from 2016

There could be many answers to this question.

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Wiki Commons

It didn’t take President Donald Trump long to condemn the terror attack in Barcelona on Thursday. But his follow-up tweet has raised some serious eyebrows among historians, veterans, human rights groups and counterterrorism experts:

Beloved Yemeni activist abducted by government security

Aug 18, 2017

You've seen and heard Hisham al-Omeisy. The friendly Yemeni observer who has told news services around the world about conditions in his war-ravaged country was abducted by three carloads of armed men in Sanaa on Monday afternoon. He is being held at the government's National Security Bureau in the Yemeni capital. 

His family cautioned reporters, many of whom count Omeisy as a friend as well as a source, to remain silent while negotiations were conducted through back channels. The family lifted its embargo today.

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Jonathan Drake/Reuters

Here's a question many of us have been debating since the deadly protests in Charlottesville last weekend: What should be done with a monument dedicated to a Confederate figure? Should it be taken down? Or should it be recontextualized? 

It's a question similar to one Paraguayans had to answer not long ago. The debate in that South American country revolved around a statue of longtime dictator General Alfredo Stroessner.

The aftermath of the deadly attacks in Barcelona

Aug 18, 2017

Thousands of people marched to the Plaça de Catalunya in Barcelona Friday, chanting “I'm not afraid” in Catalan. It was a show of solidarity after a series of terrorist attacks claimed by ISIS rocked Spain. About 14 people were killed and several more were injured in the tourist-heavy Las Ramblas area of Barcelona when a van plowed into pedestrians. Liz Castro, a writer and longtime resident of Barcelona, witnessed the march on Friday.

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Joshua Roberts/Reuters 

Peter didn’t want to use his real name because he’s afraid of becoming a target for white nationalists.

He was one of the counter-protesters in Charlottesville on Saturday — the ones President Donald Trump on Tuesday referred to as “very violent” and “charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs.”

I first reached out to Peter in July, over Skype, when I was doing research on a movement called antifa, short for anti-fascist.

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Brenna Daldorph

On Saturday, Aug. 12, four days after Kenya’s elections, Octopizzo had some tea with his cousin Oloo in Nairobi. Octopizzo is a well-known hip-hop artist in Kenya. When the cousins were done, Octo walked Oloo to a taxi stage where he could get a boda boda — a motorcycle taxi — back home to Kibera, the slum where they both grew up.

Octopizzo went home and flicked on the news.

Back in the mid-2000s, when producer Roy Lee was pitching an American remake of the Japanese horror film “Ju-On: The Grudge,” the original movie didn’t even have English subtitles. In order to shop it around, he and his team inserted their own subtitles based on what they thought was happening in the movie.

“I remember there was a meeting with the original director [Takashi Shimizu] where people were asking him about the storyline, and he had no idea what they were talking about, because we had gotten some of the details wrong,” says Lee.

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Andrea Crossan/PRI

We just finished our POSITIVE series — stories of women and girls under the age of 24 living with HIV in South Africa. We called our Series POSITIVE not only because it centers on the stories of HIV-positive women and girls, but also because it was important to us to highlight stories of people who do not see such a diagnosis as an ending.

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters 

America's standing in the world is dwindling fast under the Trump administration. The White House appears in chaos, and the failure to confront neo-Nazis has alarmed Europe. Europeans are giving up on a US that can't get anything done and refuses to provide leadership on the world stage.

These are the impressions gleaned by the BBC's Katty Kay after four weeks in Europe. Kay is an anchor of BBC World News America in Washington.


From PRI's The World ©2017 PRI

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Joshua Roberts/Reuters

I moved to Charlottesville, Virginia, in September 2003. The beautiful college town was heaven that month. Gorgeous leaves. Blue skies. Gentle breezes.

I fell in love with Charlottesville. I lived there for eight years and it remains my favorite city.

But my heart broke to see the streets there filled with anger and hate just a few days ago.

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Marcus Teply

Braunau am Inn would like to be an ordinary town, like its neighbors in this river valley on Austria's border with Germany. But it's not, thanks to an unwanted native son — Adolf Hitler. Hitler was born here in 1889 and was still in diapers when he left. But that's enough for Braunau to still be known as Hitler's hometown.

Donald Trump is not known for his strong grasp of history. But in controversial unscripted remarks this week, Trump claimed "leftists" were trying to rewrite history by destroying monuments.

“This week it's Robert E. Lee. I notice that Stonewall Jackson is coming down,” he said on Tuesday, referring to the top two generals of the Confederacy in the Civil War. “I wonder,” he continued, “is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after. You really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?"

Jason Rekulak from Philadelphia is camping with his family at a goat farm in McMinnville, Oregon.

He realized last minute that an already-planned family vacation to the West Coast would bring him within a few hours of the eclipse’s path of totality and rushed to book a place to stay.

"I thought we were going to be staying at a Holiday Inn and probably watching from a parking lot,” Rekulak said. “But instead, we're going to be on a 500-acre goat farm.”

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Courtesy of Jessica Jinn/Advancing Justice

Jason Fong is at the age when affirmative action programs could make a crucial difference in his life. He’s 17 and often uses social media and his blog to speak out about college admissions policies that consider race as a factor to create a diverse student body.

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Alejandro Alvarez/Reuters

On Saturday, a white nationalist rally erupted into deadly violence as a car plowed into a crowd. On Tuesday, President Donald Trump blamed “both sides” for the violence, in effect equating neo-Nazis and white supremacists with counter-protesters speaking out against racism.

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Justin Ide/Reuters 

Wajahat Ali is an author, attorney and son of Pakistani immigrants. He believes that what happened this week in Charlottesville is a crucial turning point in our country.

And it's that moment when, as an American, you have to take a stance.

Aussie eclipse chaser heads to Idaho for 16th eclipse

Aug 16, 2017

Roughly 200 million people live within a day’s drive of next Monday's eclipse.

But eclipse chasers road-tripping to the path of totality will also be joined by those traveling much farther to stand in the shadow of the moon for just a few minutes.

Among them is Terry Cuttle, an amateur astronomer, and photographer, traveling from Brisbane, Australia, to the US to see his 16th total solar eclipse.

He’s been planning this trip for years and is aiming for eastern Idaho where the chances of clear weather are good.  

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Courtesy of the Partition Museum

India and Pakistan both celebrate an Independence Day. In Pakistan, it’s Aug. 14; in India, a day later. Each national holiday marks the end of British rule, and the creation of two, independent countries.

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