Weekend Edition Sunday

Sundays at 8AM

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Cornish on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

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NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Your Letters: Roman Numerals; Separation Of Church And School

Host Rachel Martin shares listeners' responses to last week's show, including a conversation about Roman numerals, church congregations that meet in public schools and the romantic Latin music style called bolero.

NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Pick The Best Valentine Card, Or At Least Avoid The Worst

David Ellis Dickerson is a former Hallmark greeting card writer and the creator of a YouTube series, Greeting Card Emergency. He gives host Rachel Martin a primer on the perfect Valentine's Day card and addresses some sticky situations that may require special cards.

NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Aung San Suu Kyi's Improbable Campaign

The main opposition leader in Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi, is campaigning for a seat in parliament in her constituency outside Rangoon. It's a scene that seemed impossible only a few months ago, before the military-backed government began a process of change. Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Anthony Kuhn from Rangoon.

NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Defense Cuts Could Get Twice As Bad

The Pentagon must cut military spending by $500 billion over the next 10 years. That figure may double to $1 trillion, since the penalty imposed by last fall's congressional supercommittee was for even deeper cuts starting in 2013. Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman.

Movie Interviews
8:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

'Ides Of March' Writer Goes From Stage To Screen

Writer Beau Willimon turned his stage play, Farragut North, into the film, The Ides of March. Host Rachel Martin speaks to Willimon about the film, one of five nominated for an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Author Interviews
8:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

What French Parents Do That Americans Don't

Transcript

ELEANOR BEARDSLEY, BYLINE: American Pamela Druckerman thought she had a pretty good handle on what it means to be French, at least the stereotypes - you know, good taste in wine, a sophisticated sense of style, and a preoccupation with fine cuisine.

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Music News
6:21 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Simon Joyner: A Scene Pioneer Takes The Quiet Life

Though he's remained under the radar, Simon Joyner has never stopped making music. His newest project is a fan-funded double LP.
Courtesy of the artist

In the early 1990s, Beck listed Omaha, Neb., songwriter Simon Joyner in a personal top-10 list for Rolling Stone magazine. Famed British DJ John Peel, known for making careers for playing just one of a band's songs, played Joyner's fourth album in its entirety.

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The Record
6:20 am
Sun February 12, 2012

One Grammy Award You Won't See On TV

Syl Johnson poses for a portrait circa 1972. A box set collecting much of his work has been nominated for two Grammys.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

The 54th Grammy Awards will be handed out Sunday — not all of them during the evening telecast. The winners of the lower-profile categories are announced earlier in the day, and Weekend Edition host Rachel Martin spoke to Ken Shipley, who's nominated for two of those: Best Historical Album and Best Album Notes.

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Arts & Life
6:20 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Black, Female And An Inspirational Modern Artist

Elizabeth Catlett's 1968 sculpture Homage to My Young Black Sisters
Allison Keyes NPR

Just in the last year, 96-year-old American artist Elizabeth Catlett has had her work featured in exhibitions from Istanbul to Mexico to New York. Young artists use Catlett's technical expertise and insights into gender, race and class as a jumping-off point for their own work, yet she's still unknown to much of the general public.

The 'Invisible' Artist

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Sunday Puzzle
12:01 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Hey, I've Got Five On It!

NPR Graphic

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is a familiar three-word phrase, name or title in which each word has five letters — for example, "Royal Opera House."

Last Week's Challenge: Name an animal. Add the letters "A" and "T," and rearrange the result to name another animal. These are both animals that might be found in a zoo, and the last letter of the first animal is the first letter of the last one.

Answer: If you add "A" and "T" to "gorilla," you can rearrange the letters to spell "alligator."

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Author Interviews
8:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

NASCAR's Waltrip: Why It 'Will Never Be The Same'

NASCAR Hall Of Fame driver Darrell Waltrip has a new book, Sundays Will Never Be the Same. Waltrip discusses his long and successful career as a driver and his time afterward in the announcer's booth. Host Rachel Martin also speaks with Waltrip about the day his longtime friend and rival Dale Earnhart died in a crash.

Brain Candy
8:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

A Rhyme To Remember Your Roman Numerals

The Super Bowl is probably the one time of year when any of us bother to pay attention to roman numerals. This year it's 46, otherwise written as XLVI. Just can't keep your numerals straight? Ian Chillag and Michael Danforth of NPR's podcast How Do You Do That explain the subtleties of Roman Numerals for the watchers of Super Bowl XLVI.

NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

How 'Hugo' Turned From Book To Film

Before Hugo was the hit film directed by Martin Scorsese, it was a children's book called The Invention of Hugo Cabret, by Brian Selznick. Host Rachel Martin speaks to screenwriter John Logan, whose script for the film has been nominated for an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay.

NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Violence Rises In Syria As UN Falters

For nearly a year, Syria's government has sustained a violent crackdown against opposition protesters. The international community has struggled to agree on a unified response, and on Saturday, the latest effort to bring pressure on Syria's leaders fell apart. Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Kelly McEvers, who is monitoring developments in Syria.

NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Cezanne Sold To Qatar For A Record Price

Last year, the oil-rich Gulf nation of Qatar quietly purchased a painting by Paul Cezanne for more than $250 million, the highest amount ever paid for a work of art. Rachel Martin talks with Alexandra Peers, who recently wrote about the sale in Vanity Fair.

Sunday Puzzle
12:01 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Rearranging The Deck Chairs On The Anti-Tic

NPR Graphic

On-Air Challenge: Each clue contains at least one seven-letter word. Rearrange the letters in that word to answer the clue.

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Music Interviews
11:03 pm
Sat February 4, 2012

Joe Cocker: The 'Hard Knock' Life Of A Singular Singer

Joe Cocker's new album is Hard Knocks.
Olaf Heine

Joe Cocker has one of the most recognizable voices in rock — anyone who's heard his version of "With a Little Help From My Friends" can attest to that. The British singer has been belting out hits for more than 40 years, the biggest of which include "Feelin' Alright," "Up Where We Belong" and "You Can Leave Your Hat On."

But with all that success also came some hard times. Cocker has struggled with drugs, alcohol and financial debt, all of which he's discussed openly.

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From Our Listeners
8:00 am
Sun January 29, 2012

Your Letters: Celebrating Music And 25 Years On Air

Host Rachel Martin reads from listener comments about last week's show, including taking up an instrument as an adult and the 25th anniversary of Weekend Edition Sunday.

Movies
8:00 am
Sun January 29, 2012

From Book To Film: Nominees For Adapted Screenplay

What does it take to turn a story told in one medium into a hit film? In the weeks ahead, we're going to explore that question with some of the nominees in this year's Best Adapted Screenplay category of the Academy Awards. Host Rachel Martin speaks to Sasha Stone, founder and editor of AwardsDaily.com.

Religion
5:57 am
Sun January 29, 2012

On The Record: A Quest For De-Baptism In France

Though marginal, the de-baptism movement is growing, observers say.
iStockphoto.com

In France, an elderly man is fighting to make a formal break with the Catholic Church. He's taken the church to court over its refusal to let him nullify his baptism, in a case that could have far-reaching effects.

Seventy-one-year-old Rene LeBouvier's parents and his brother are buried in a churchyard in the tiny village of Fleury in northwest France. He himself was baptized in the Romanesque stone church and attended mass here as a boy.

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Food
5:57 am
Sun January 29, 2012

Moscato Madness: The Dessert Wine's Sweet Surge

Moscato was on display at the 2010 international wine and spirits show "Vinitaly" in Italy. Since then, moscato sales have skyrocketed.
Luca Bruno AP

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 4:43 pm

In the U.S., wine drinking has held its own during these hard economic times, and even grown in some unlikely corners. Moscato, for example, the Italian dessert wine, has gone from relative obscurity to the toast of the town.

Hip-hop singer Drake, in his song "Do It Now," gives it a shout-out. It's also the wine Kanye West orders for special parties. And it's the wine Real Housewife of Atlanta NeNe Leakes has just started selling under the label Miss Moscato.

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Sports
5:54 am
Sun January 29, 2012

'I Am A Boxer': Fighter In The Ring, Lady Outside It

Tiara Brown, shown at the International Duel in Oxnard, Calif., last year, is competing for a spot on the U.S. women's Olympic team.
Sue Jaye Johnson

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:04 am

Part of a series with WNYC on female boxers

This summer in London, female boxers will compete in the Olympics for the first time. The women competing for a spot on the U.S. team will make history, but few know who they are — and why they box.

Women who box love it for the same reasons men do. Boxing requires intense physical and psychological discipline, the ability to overcome fear and anger.

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Sunday Puzzle
12:01 am
Sun January 29, 2012

This Puzzle Is 'The Pits'

NPR Graphic

On-Air Challenge: Today's puzzle is "the pits." Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word starts with "PI" and the second word starts with "T."

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NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun January 22, 2012

How Ron Paul And Rick Santorum Performed In SC

NPR's Don Gonyea reports on the also-rans in Saturday's South Carolina primary.

NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Arab League Weighs Monitoring Mission In Syria

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We go now to Egypt, where a group of foreign ministers from the Arab League is meeting today. There are news reports that the group has decided to extend a month-long observer mission in Syria.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro has been tracking events there, and she joins us now from Cairo. Welcome to the program, Lulu.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, BYLINE: Thank you.

MARTIN: First off, can you give us a little more about the decision to extend? What do you know?

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NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Your Letters

Host Rachel Martin reads from listener letters and posts.

Movies
8:00 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Checking In On The Sundance Film Festival

Host Rachel Martin speaks with entertainment reporter Stacey Wilson about this year's Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

Books
6:33 am
Sun January 22, 2012

'Cultural Revolution Cookbook': A Taste Of Humanity

Braised Pork In Soy
Melisa Goh NPR

From about 1966 to 1976, China's leader Mao Zedong enforced a brutal agenda. Everything was rationed during the Cultural Revolution. Millions of people were forced out of the cities and into the countryside, where food was even scarcer. The government controlled people's movements, their livelihoods, even their thoughts.

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Sunday Puzzle
12:01 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Sitting Comfortably In Between

NPR Graphic

On-Air Challenge: You'll be given two things in the same category. You name the only other thing in the same category that fits between the given things alphabetically. For example, given "Mars" and "Saturn," the answer would be "Mercury."

Last Week's Challenge: Will Shortz celebrates the 25th anniversary of Weekend Edition Sunday and the Sunday Puzzle with three mystery guests.

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NPR Story
8:00 am
Sun January 15, 2012

Somalian Refugees Sing Of Peace

The Daadab refugee camp in northeastern Kenya is home to half a million Somalis who have fled the chaos and bloodshed of their homeland. Some are recent arrivals. But many have lived there for decades, including musicians. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton met up with some who have put their hopes and dreams into song.

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