Weekend Edition Sunday

Sundays at 8AM

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Cornish on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

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Code Switch
11:18 am
Sun June 22, 2014

Shape-Up And Checkup: LA Barbers To Start Testing Blood Pressure

Ben Russell iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 3:14 pm

Barbershops are a traditional gathering place for African-American men — a place to talk politics, sports and gossip. Now, some doctors in Los Angeles are hoping to make the barbershop a place for combating high blood pressure among black men.

Death rates from hypertension are three times higher in African-American men than in white men of the same age, says Dr. Ronald Victor, the director of Cedars-Sinai Center for Hypertension in Los Angeles.

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Music Interviews
8:01 am
Sun June 22, 2014

Tom Freund Is Oddly Upbeat In 'Two Moons'

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 2:33 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Back in the early '80s, Randy Newman famously sand about the City of Angels.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I LOVE L.A.")

RANDY NEWMAN: (Singing) It's like another perfect day. I love LA. We love it.

NEARY: Singer-songwriter Tom Freund offers his take on Los Angeles right out of the box on the first track of his new album "Two Moons."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ANGEL EYES")

TOM FREUND: (Singing) Funny how when you leave L.A., you got to drive into the desert. Out of the frying pan and into the fire.

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Music News
8:01 am
Sun June 22, 2014

Almost Intermediate: Adults Learn Lessons In 'Late Starters Orchestra'

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 2:35 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

By our measure, Ari Goldman is a successful man. A former New York Times reporter turned college professor, he is deeply religious and a happily married husband and father. But for all of that, there was something missing in his life. Goldman yearned to play a musical instrument.

ARI GOLDMAN: The cello is sort of the music of my soul. It's the instrument that speaks most directly to me. I never thought that I would be able to play a cello.

(SOUNDBITE OF CELLO)

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Author Interviews
8:01 am
Sun June 22, 2014

'Astonish Me' Asks, Is It Enough To Only Be Good?

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:17 pm

We're continuing our weekend reads recommendations with author Alexander Chee, whose novel Edinburgh won multiple literary awards. Chee's pick for you this weekend is Astonish Me, by Maggie Shipstead — the tale of a ballerina who leaves the dance world to have a baby. Chee tells NPR's Rachel Martin that he appreciates Shipstead's prose, which he calls excellent but not flashy. "I think of it as having a transparent quality which is to say that you're drawn into the story more than you are made to consistently pay attention to the style of it.

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The Record
11:30 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Casey Kasem, An Iconic Voice Of American Radio

Casey Kasem, in 1975.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 12:56 pm

Casey Kasem, the countdown king of music radio and the voice of Scooby-Doo's Shaggy, has died at 82, his publicist confirmed Sunday.

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The Sunday Conversation
10:49 am
Sun June 15, 2014

The Joy Of Leaving An Arranged Marriage — And The Cost

Fraidy Reiss was married to an abusive husband when she was 19 years old. After leaving her husband and the Ultra-Orthodox Jewish community she'd known all her life, she founded an organization to help other women escape their arranged marriages.
Courtesy of Unchained For Life

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 11:03 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

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Food
10:15 am
Sun June 15, 2014

The Milkman's Comeback Means Dairy At The Door And More

Driver Rick Galloway of South Mountain Creamery delivers milk in Liberty Town, Md., in 2004. Today the company has 8,500 home delivery accounts in five states.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 10:50 am

You don't even have to get out of your PJs to go to the farmers market now.

All over the country, trucks are now delivering fresh milk, organic vegetables and humanely raised chickens to your door — though in New York, the deliveries come by bike.

Fifty years ago, about 30 percent of milk still came from the milkman. By 2005, the last year for which USDA has numbers, only 0.4 percent was home delivered.

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Iraq
9:38 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Militants' Advance In Iraq Agitates Oil Markets

Cars pack a Kurdish checkpoint as residents flee Mosul in northern Iraq. The city was overrun by Islamic militants last week.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 11:38 am

When Sunni militants began seizing broad swathes of territory across northern Iraq last week, global oil markets shrugged it off. After all, instability in Iraq is nothing new.

But that all changed on Wednesday, when the insurgents swept into the oil refinery town of Baiji, says Robert McNally, president of the Rapidan Group, an energy consulting firm. The price of oil climbed nearly 4 percent in just a few short days.

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History
9:23 am
Sun June 15, 2014

From Former Slaves To Writers, Civilians, Too, Rest At Arlington

Arlington National Cemetery is the final resting place for more than 400,000 men and women. Most were members of the armed forces who served in active duty — but not all.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 1:32 pm

Just over the Arlington Memorial Bridge, which connects the nation's capital to Virginia, lies a piece of sacred ground: 624 acres covered in rows and rows of headstones and American flags.

Sunday marks the 150th anniversary of the designation of Arlington National Cemetery. The military burial ground was created on land that was once the home of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee — and was established, in part, to accommodate the many Americans killed in the Civil War.

Today, more than 400,000 men and women are buried there.

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Sunday Puzzle
8:20 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Floating Down The Anagram River

NPR

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 11:38 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is geographical. Every answer is the name of a river — identify it using its anagram minus a letter. Example: Top minus T = Po (River).

Last Week's Challenge: Name part of a TV that contains the letter C. Replace the C with the name of a book of the Old Testament, keeping all the letters in order. The result will name a sailing vessel of old. What is it?

Answer: Viking Ship

Winner: Jay Adams of Monticello, Fla.

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Sports
7:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Spurs Could Settle NBA Championship On Sunday

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 11:38 am

Slate.com's Mike Pesca looks at the odds of the Miami Heat staging a comeback to beat the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA championship in a chat with NPR's Scott Simon.

Author Interviews
7:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Painful Path To Fatherhood Inspires Poet's New Collection

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 1:00 pm

Douglas Kearney's new book of poetry, Patter, is not something you pick up casually. It demands a lot from its audience — one reviewer wrote that the book's readers must be "agile, adaptive, vigilant and tough."

But the payoff is worth it. Kearney takes his readers into an extremely private struggle, shared with his wife: their attempt to conceive a child. The poems trace a journey through infertility, miscarriage, in vitro fertilization and, finally, fatherhood.

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Music Interviews
7:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

'SNL' Music Director Writes A Finnish 'Prescription'

Lenny Pickett has played in the SNL band for 29 years.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 4:10 pm

You may not immediately recognize the name Lenny Pickett. But if you've watched Saturday Night Live in the last 30 years, you've heard him.

The curly-haired saxophonist is there, wailing front and center, every week as the host enters the stage. He's been with the house band for nearly 30 years, and the show's musical director since 1995.

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Sports
6:34 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

The World Cup Reminds Us That All The World's A Soccer Field

Children play soccer in the village of Limon in the Peten region of northern Guatemala.
Jason Beaubien NPR

The global reach of soccer never ceases to amaze me. I travel all over the world, sometimes to incredibly remote areas. More often than not, when I get there, somebody is kicking around a soccer ball.

It doesn't matter if it's Asia or Africa or Central America. Kids make a goal out of a couple of backpacks, throw out a ball and the game is on. The "ball" could be a knotted towel or a tennis ball or a tattered leather shell that's barely holding air.

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National Security
3:53 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

If The NSA Can't Keep Call Records, Should Phone Companies Do It?

Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., questioned whether phone companies would retain calling data.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 6:34 pm

Perhaps the most controversial spying program revealed by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden was the agency's hoarding of Americans' phone records.

Congress wants to change that program.

The House has passed legislation that would end the NSA's bulk collection of Americans' calling data and let phone companies hold the records instead.

As a Senate panel found last week, that proposal could run into trouble.

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Sunday Puzzle
11:46 am
Sun June 8, 2014

A Puzzle In E-Z Mode

NPR

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 6:34 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word ends in E and the second word starts with Z. For example, given, "popular blush wine," the answer would be: White zinfandel.

Last week's challenge: This challenge came from listener Dan Pitt of Palo Alto, Calif. Take the name of a well-known American businessman — first and last names. Put the last name first. Insert an M between the two names. The result names a food item. What is it?

Answer: Muskmelon (Elon Musk)

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The Sunday Conversation
11:46 am
Sun June 8, 2014

A Christian Climate Scientist's Mission To Convert Nonbelievers

Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist and the director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University. She is also a devout Christian.
Courtesy of Katharine Hayhoe

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 5:56 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Last week, the Obama administration announced historic regulations to limit carbon dioxide emissions. Policies to address climate change have been a tough sell among some Republicans on Capitol Hill, but also in many Christian congregations around the country.

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Middle East
12:47 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

What Elections? Syrian Opposition Rejects Assad's Expected Win

A mock election poster depicts Syrian President Bashar Assad as Mafia boss Don Corleone, with token candidates kissing his hand.
Ahmed Jalal/Kafranbel Syrian Revolution

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 2:02 pm

Tuesday's elections in Syria are sure to result in another term for President Bashar Assad, even as the international community says his regime is responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians.

The opposition is railing against his inevitable triumph.

At a demonstration Friday by some of the 1 million Syrians who have fled into neighboring Lebanon, the view on the election was clear.

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The Sunday Conversation
11:58 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Tiananmen Survivor Looks Back At China's 'Lost Opportunity'

Shen Tong was a 20-year-old student in Beijing during the Tiananmen Square massacre.
Courtesy of Teresa Lin

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

This week marks 25 years since the massacre at Tiananmen Square in Beijing. In 1989, Chinese security forces conducted a widespread crackdown on pro-democracy protesters that left hundreds — some say thousands — dead. But months before the standoff, protesters saw no sign of coming violence.

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National Security
11:55 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Was Negotiating With The Taliban The Only Way To Free Bergdahl?

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Rep. Mike Rogers is critical of negotiating with the Taliban, but an exchange took place to free Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Rogers, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee.

Sports
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Why Cities Find The Olympics Games Are Losing Their Appeal

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Slate.com's Mike Pesca about the record $2 billion purchase of the LA Clippers, and about why no one wants to host the 2022 Winter Olympics.

Sports
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Favela Experience, For A Taste Of Authentic Brazilian Slum Living

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If you're planning to go to Brazil for the World Cup, and you don't have your hotel yet, you're probably out of luck unless you're willing to stay off the beaten path in a favela, which is the Portuguese word for slum.

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Europe
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Obama's Europe Trip To Mark Poland, D-Day Anniversaries

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. President Obama wrapped up a big week full of highs and lows - from his foreign policy speech at West Point to the resignation of VA secretary Eric Shinseki, and the news that the sole American POW from the Afghan war has been released.

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Europe
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Le Pen Victory In France Presents A Paradox For Hollande

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Far-right political parties won big in European parliamentary elections in many countries last weekend. Their victory was particularly painful in France, a founding member of the European Union, and has deepened the sense of crisis for the very unpopular Socialist president, Francois Hollande. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports from Paris.

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Author Interviews
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Rick Springfield On Divorce, God And The Loch Ness Monster

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 6:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

'Explorers' Search For The Source Of The World's Longest River

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In 1856, two British explorers, Richard Burton and John Speke, set out on a journey for the history books to find the source of the longest river in the world - the Nile. The trip would lead them through some of the most remote and uncharted parts of the African continent.

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Research News
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Creativity, Dirty Eggs And Vocal Fry: The Week In Science

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 2:44 pm

Science is always churning out weird, funny and fascinating findings. What did we miss this week? NPR's Rachel Martin checks in with science writer Rose Eveleth.

Europe
8:02 am
Sun May 25, 2014

Separatists Shut Down Polling Places In East Ukraine Cities

Originally published on Sun May 25, 2014 11:51 am

Correspondent Peter Kenyon tells NPR's Rachel Martin that voting is brisk in Sunday's presidential election in Ukraine — except in the east, where pro-Russian separatists have shut down polls.

Sunday Puzzle
8:02 am
Sun May 25, 2014

A Puzzle In The Merry Merry Month Of May

NPR

Originally published on Sun May 25, 2014 11:51 am

On-air challenge: The theme of today's puzzle is May. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word starts with MA and the second word ends with Y. Example: Alcoholic beverage made from fermented mash: Malt Whiskey

Last Week's Challenge: Name a famous actress of the past whose last name has two syllables. Reverse the syllables phonetically. The result will name an ailment. What is it?

Answer: Sarah Bernhardt — heart burn

Winner: David Hodges of Collingswood, N.J.

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Music Lists
8:02 am
Sun May 25, 2014

Alt.Latino: Cumbia Tracks With Surf Guitars And Theramin

Originally published on Sun May 25, 2014 11:51 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SERENATA GUAJIRA")

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We are raising the energy level a little bit this morning with cumbia, old-school cumbia. It's a track brought in by our friends at Alt.Latino, NPR Music's show about Latin music.

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