Weekend Edition Sunday

Sundays at 8AM

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Cornish on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

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Education
8:29 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Imagining The Future: 'Howard Project' Students Look Forward

"Howard Project" participants (left to right) Kevin Peterman, Taylor Davis, Ariel Alford and Leighton Watson in the Howard University library.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 12:36 pm

In some ways, the questions young people grapple with are universal: Who are you? What's important to you? What kind of life do you want?

But at the same time, those questions are profoundly shaped by each person's experience.

As part of an ongoing conversation on Weekend Edition, four college seniors at a historically black university in Washington, D.C., are sharing insight into their experiences β€” both shared and individual.

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Sunday Puzzle
8:03 am
Sun February 22, 2015

And The Oscar Goes To ...

NPR

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:04 am

On-air challenge: Every answer today is the name of an Academy Award winner or nominee for best picture. Using the given anagram, decipher the title of the film. The films will go from oldest to newest. Example: OUTWORN (1940) (2 words). Answer: OUR TOWN

Last week's challenge: Name a major U.S. city in two syllables. Reverse the syllables phonetically to get the cost of attending a certain NBA game. What is it?

Answer: Phoenix, Knicks fee

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Sports
8:01 am
Sun February 22, 2015

The Week In Sports: 76ers On A Rebuilding Spree

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 12:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Middle East
8:01 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Turkey Launches Operation Across Syria's Border

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 12:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Africa
12:49 pm
Sun February 15, 2015

With Oil Fields Under Attack, Libya's Economic Future Looks Bleak

Libya's oil terminals β€” like the Brega refinery and oil terminal, pictured in March 11, 2014 β€” are being fought over by militias and by the nation's two rival governments. The conflict is drying up production, and may have a devastating impact on the nation's battered economy.
Abdullah Doma AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 9:57 am

The headquarters of the National Oil Corporation in Tripoli are gleaming, the floors marble, the offices decked out with black leather chairs and fake flowers. It seems far from the fighting going on over oil terminals around the country.

But the man in charge looks at production and knows the future is bleak.

"We cannot produce. We are losing 80 percent of our production," says Mustapha Sanallah, the chairman of Libya's National Oil Corporation.

He looks like a typical executive, decked out in a suit and glasses. But beneath his calm veneer, he's worried.

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Religion
9:23 am
Sun February 15, 2015

Some See Extreme 'Anti-Theism' As Motive In N.C. Killings

This image provided by the Durham County Sheriff's Office shows a booking photo of Craig Stephen Hicks, 46, who was arrested on three counts of murder early Wednesday. On his Facebook page, Hicks described himself as a gun-toting atheist.
Durham County Sheriff's Office AP

Originally published on Sun February 15, 2015 12:49 pm

Outrage over the murder of three young Muslim Americans in North Carolina last week has gone international. The Organization of Islamic Cooperation said Saturday that the killings reflected "Islamophobia" and "bear the symptoms of a hate crime," but local authorities say they don't yet know what motivated the murders.

The man held responsible for the killings is an avowed atheist. Whether that's relevant in this case is not clear, but some experts see a new extremism developing among some atheists.

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The Salt
8:26 am
Sun February 15, 2015

For Musician Jack White, Any Old Guacamole Just Won't Do

The recipe for guacamole in musician Jack White's concert rider is more like a guacamole salad. But chef Martin Morales says it's pretty good.
Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Thu February 19, 2015 2:52 pm

Jack White, formerly of the White Stripes, must really hate bananas. Because according to his concert rider, which was recently made public, he doesn't want to lay eyes on one at his concerts.

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Sunday Puzzle
7:46 am
Sun February 15, 2015

'La La La' I Can't Hear You

NPR

Originally published on Thu February 19, 2015 9:42 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is called "La La La." Every answer is a word or name of three or more syllables in which an interior syllable is an accented "la." Example: Family name of the former shah of Iran: Pahlavi

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Sports
7:27 am
Sun February 15, 2015

Phoenix Suns' Two Sets Of Brothers Redefine Sibling Rivalry

Phoenix Suns forward Marcus Morris, left, congratulates his twin brother, Markieff, after he scored against the Sacramento Kings during the fourth quarter of a game on April 16, 2014.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Sun February 15, 2015 12:49 pm

The most exciting moment of the NBA All-Star Game tonight just might be the first moment. Two brothers, Chicago's Pau Gasol and Memphis' Marc Gasol, will square off for the opening jump ball.

But they're not even the most surprising sibling story in the NBA. The Phoenix Suns have two sets of brothers on its roster.

Markieff and Marcus Morris both play on the Suns. They're identical twins, right down to their matching tattoos.

And then there are two guys with the name Dragić on their backs: Goran and Zoran.

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History
7:27 am
Sun February 15, 2015

A Story Of U.S. Maritime Disaster Resurfaces

Originally published on Sun February 15, 2015 12:49 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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INDIRA LAKSHMANAN, HOST:

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Europe
7:27 am
Sun February 15, 2015

Ukraine Cease-Fire Goes Into Effect, With Caution

Originally published on Sun February 15, 2015 12:49 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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INDIRA LAKSHMANAN, HOST:

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NPR Story
11:41 am
Sun February 8, 2015

College Basketball Loses A Legend: Dean Smith Dead At 83

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It is time now for sports. We are joined, as ever, by Mike Pesca. He's the host of The Gist podcast from Slate.com. Good morning, Mike.

MIKE PESCA: Hello.

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It's All Politics
10:56 am
Sun February 8, 2015

McConnell's Call For 'Regular Order' May Not Mean What It Used To

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky returns to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington on Jan. 29, 2015.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun February 8, 2015 11:41 am

"Regular order" is a phrase you'd normally hear only from Congress nerds, but it's increasingly common in conversations about the Senate this year.

When Mitch McConnell became Senate majority leader, he promised he'd restore what he called regular order in that chamber. But Democrats have been accusing him of violating regular order ever since.

When you listen to senators talk about regular order, it sounds like this fabulous, amazing thing. For Republican John McCain of Arizona, regular order is about getting stuff done.

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Law
10:12 am
Sun February 8, 2015

Next Witness: Will The Yellow Smiley Face Take The Stand?

Are these jokers ready to appear in court?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed February 11, 2015 2:21 pm

Emojis can be a lot of fun. Little pictures on our phones seem to express sentiments when words just fall short. Sometimes we need to punctuate our sentences with a sad cat, floating hearts, maybe an alien head.

They aren't complicated when they appear in our personal email or texts, but emojis are now popping up in a place where their meanings are closely scrutinized: courtrooms.

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Parallels
10:07 am
Sun February 8, 2015

In A Twist, Greeks Demonstrate In Favor Of Their Government

A woman wrapped in a Greek flag makes her way in to a demonstration to support the new anti-austerity government in Athens on Thursday.
Louisa Goulimaki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 8, 2015 5:14 pm

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

Melina Kotzaki and Nikos Vlastaris, two 70-year-old retirees living on small pensions, stood side by side outside parliament in Athens last week along with thousands of other Greeks, holding hand-written signs about freedom.

"This is the first time I've seen a rally supporting the government in my life," said Vlastaris, a former merchant marine officer. "And we have to support our new government. We are in an economic war that has made us a poor country without a voice."

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Sunday Puzzle
8:03 am
Sun February 8, 2015

Two Is Company, Three Is A Crowd

Sunday Puzzle
NPR

Originally published on Sun February 8, 2015 11:41 am

On-air challenge: For each familiar two-word phrase, use the first three letters of the first word and the first three letters of the second word to start two other words that have opposite meanings of each other. Example: Health food = HEAD, FOOT

Last week's challenge: Think of a well-known place name in the U.S. in four letters. Switch the second and third letters to get a well-known place name in Europe. What is it?

Answer: Erie, Eire

Winner: Paul Weinstock of Gahanna, Ohio.

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Sports
7:38 am
Sun February 8, 2015

The Week In Sports: NBA And WNBA Newsmakers

Originally published on Wed February 11, 2015 4:28 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Super Bowl is over, but there's still plenty of sports to discuss involving balls of other shapes - in particular, basketball. To do that, we are joined as ever by Mike Pesca. He is the host of The Gist podcast from slate.com. Good morning, Sir.

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Around the Nation
7:38 am
Sun February 8, 2015

What Happens When Wives Earn More Than Husbands

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 3:08 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time for some number crunching from our data expert, Mona Chalabi, from fivethirtyeight.com. And she has given us this number of the week.

AUTOMATED VOICE: Thirty-eight.

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Europe
7:38 am
Sun February 8, 2015

Merkel's U.S. Visit Could Turn Testy

Originally published on Sun February 8, 2015 11:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Book News & Features
7:38 am
Sun February 8, 2015

Christian Grey Began His Fictional Career As A Vampire

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 2:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
7:38 am
Sun February 8, 2015

Native American Women Are, Increasingly, Family Breadwinners

Originally published on Sun February 8, 2015 11:41 am

Copyright 2015 Wyoming Public Radio Network. To see more, visit http://www.wyomingpublicmedia.org.

Environment
11:39 am
Sun February 1, 2015

The Ice Is Talking. We Just Have To Listen

Giant chunks of ice break away from the Hans Glacier in Svalbard, Norway, in 2013.
Courtesy Oskar Glowacki

Originally published on Thu February 12, 2015 8:14 am

If a glacier cracks and nobody hears it, does it still make a sound?

"Oh, they moan and they groan," says Grant Deane, a researcher at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. "They crackle and rumble and fizz, and they have all kinds of amazing sounds that they make."

Deane is one of the authors of a new study that interprets the acoustics of glacial melting.

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Middle East
11:39 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Egypt Frees One Al-Jazeera Journalist From Prison

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 12:04 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sunday Puzzle
8:03 am
Sun February 1, 2015

The Ol' Puzzle Switcheroo

Sunday Puzzle
NPR

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a made-up two-word phrase, where the second and third letters of the first word are switched to get the second word. Example: Serene bivalve would be calm clam

Last week's challenge: This challenge came from listener Ben Bass of Chicago. Name someone who welcomes you in. Insert the letter U somewhere inside this, and you'll name something that warns you to stay away. Who is this person, and what is this thing?

Answer: Bell boy, bell buoy.

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Author Interviews
7:57 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Are Danes Really That Happy? The Myth Of The Scandinavian Utopia

A view of Oslo, Norway, taken from the surrounding hills. Author Michael Booth says Norwegians were traditionally thought of as Scandinavia's "country bumpkin."
Lise Aaserud AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 11:03 am

What comes to mind when you think of Scandinavia? Great education systems? The world's happiest people? Healthy work-life balance?

One man, a British transplant living in Denmark, sought to set the record straight about his adoptive homeland.

Michael Booth is the author of The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia. He tells NPR's Rachel Martin about how culturally different Scandinavian countries really are.

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Strange News
7:56 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Seven Short Seconds Between A Canadian And Lottery Riches

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

StoryCorps
9:59 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Losing A Soul Mate And A Pillar Of St. Louis' Trans Community

Shane Fairchild (left) tells his friend Sayer Johnson that his late wife, Blue Bauer, was "the only person I ever met that ever treated me like I was me."
StoryCorps

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 9:19 am

StoryCorps' OutLoud initiative records stories from the LGBTQ community.

Shane Fairchild's wife, Blue Bauer, was "very rough around the edges," he says: "Blue was 6-foot tall, weighed about 230 pounds, had red hair and brown eyes, had been a trucker all of her life," Fairchild tells their friend Sayer Johnson during a StoryCorps interview in St. Louis, Mo.

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Sunday Puzzle
9:59 am
Sun January 25, 2015

A Puzzle Full Of Air

Sunday Puzzle
NPR

On-air challenge: Every answer today is a word starting with the letters A-R, which you will identify from its anagram. For example, given AR plus ROB, the answer would be "arbor."

Last week's challenge: Name two animals, both mammals, one of them domestic, the other wild. Put their letters together, and rearrange the result to name another mammal, this one wild, and not seen naturally around North America. What mammal is it?

Answer: dog + gnu = dugong

Winner: Michael Kurh, Geneva, Ill.

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Health
8:04 am
Sun January 25, 2015

The Potential Impact Of Big Data On Medicine

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 8:22 am

Some researchers say big data could change the way medical research is done and the way individual doctors make medical decisions. Others say it raises too many questions when it comes to medicine. (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on Jan. 5.)

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
8:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Super Bowl Talk (Other Than Ball Deflation)

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 9:59 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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