T.E.D. Radio Hour

Sunday 10AM

A journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions, and new ways to think and create. Based on riveting TEDTalks from the world's most remarkable minds.

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Will GPS Change Our Standards for Privacy?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:42 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Todd Humphreys' TEDTalk

Todd Humphreys forecasts the near-future of geolocation when millimeter-accurate GPS "dots" will enable you to find pin-point locations, index-search your physical possessions — or to track people without their knowledge. And the response to the sinister side of this technology may have unintended consequences of its own.

About Todd Humphreys

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

When Will Driverless Cars Be A Part Of Our Everyday Lives?

"I'm really looking forward to a time when generations after us look back at us and say how ridiculous it was that humans were driving cars" — Sebastian Thrun
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 9:52 am

Part 6 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Sebastian Thrun's TEDTalk

Researcher Sebastian Thrun helped build Google's amazing driverless car, which he says will not only revolutionize how we get around, but also save lives.

About Sebastian Thrun

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TED Radio Hour
10:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Can Hacking The Stratosphere Solve Climate Change?

Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 2:43 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Hackers.

About David Keith's TEDTalk

Environmental scientist David Keith proposes a cheap and shocking way to address climate change: What if we inject a huge cloud of sulfur into the atmosphere to deflect sunlight and heat?

About David Keith

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TED Radio Hour
9:42 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Are Earth's Deepest Caves The Last Frontier?

Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:39 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode To The Edge.

About Bill Stone's TEDTalk

Bill Stone is a maverick cave explorer who has plumbed Earth's deepest abysses. In this talk, he explains what it's like to descend into the deepest caves in complete darkness for days on end — and why he keeps doing it.

About Bill Stone

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TED Radio Hour
9:42 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Why Row Across The Oceans?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:39 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode To The Edge.

About Roz Savage's TEDTalk

Roz Savage hated her high-powered London job. So she made the obvious next move: She quit to become an ocean rower. Now she's crossed the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans — solo.

About Roz Savage

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TED Radio Hour
9:42 am
Fri July 26, 2013

What's It Take To Become A Polar Explorer?

frogdesignmind

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:39 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode To The Edge.

About Ben Saunders' TEDTalk

Explorer Ben Saunders wants you to go outside. Not because it's always pleasant and happy, but because that's where the meat of life is, "the juice that we can suck out of our hours and days." In 2004, Saunders skied solo to the North Pole. Saunders' next outdoor excursion? To try to be the first in the world to walk from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole and back again.

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TED Radio Hour
9:51 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Is Too Much Collaboration a Bad Thing?

Work doesn't happen at the office, says Jason Fried.
TED

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:04 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Jason Fried's TEDTalk

Software entrepreneur Jason Fried has a radical theory of working: that the office isn't a good place to do it. In his talk, he lays out the main problems and offers suggestions to make work work.

About Jason Fried

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TED Radio Hour
9:51 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Can You Code A Better Government?

Jennifer Pahlka speaking about Code for America at the TED conference.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:06 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Jennifer Pahlka's TEDTalk

Can government be run like the Internet, permissionless and open? Coder and activist Jennifer Pahlka believes it can — and that apps, built quickly and cheaply, are a powerful new way to connect citizens to their governments — and their neighbors.

About Jennifer Pahlka

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TED Radio Hour
9:55 am
Fri May 17, 2013

How Can You Give A Community Better Health?

Ron Finley, renegade gardener, says food is both the problem and the solution.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri December 20, 2013 9:37 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Giving It Away.

About Ron Finley's TEDTalk

Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA — in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys."

About Ron Finley

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Podcasts

  • Friday, August 22, 2014 7:50am

    We try so hard to be perfect, to never make mistakes and to avoid failure at all costs. But mistakes happen. And when they do, how do we deal with being wrong? In this episode, TED speakers look at those darker moments in our lives, and consider why sometimes we need to make mistakes and face them head on. Dr. Brian Goldman tells a profound story about the first big mistake he made in the ER, and questions medicine's culture of denial. Professor Brené Brown explains how important it is to confront shame. Also, jazz composer Stefon Harris argues that a lot of our actions are seen as mistakes only because we don't react to them appropriately. Plus, Margaret Heffernan, the former CEO of five businesses, tells the story of two unexpected collaborators, and how good disagreement is central to progress.

  • Wednesday, August 20, 2014 10:28am

    This recording of "Beauty and the Brain," a session hosted by Guy Raz at TED 2014, brings popular speakers back to the TED stage with updates on their work and personal lives.  Tierney Thys talks about how being in the natural world engages your brain; Dan Gilbert discusses why we so often make decisions that our future selves regret; Jane McGonigal explores a video game that is better than morphine at relieving pain; seventeen-year-old Taylor Wilson details his progress on the nuclear reactor he built in his garage; and Jill Bolte Taylor, the neuro-scientist who lived through a stroke, explains how her life has changed since her TED Talk went viral. 

  • Friday, August 15, 2014 1:33am

    We all want to find happiness, but it seems elusive. Can we learn more about happiness through science? Or are there simpler ways to achieve it? Host Guy Raz feels happy listening to Pharrell’s song “Happy”, so Guy asked Pharrell to share his ideas on happiness. Then we hear from five TED speakers who contemplate different paths to finding happiness. Researcher Matt Killingsworth says we're often happiest when we're lost in the moment. Journalist Carl Honore believes our society's emphasis on speed erodes our quality of life. Writer Graham Hill makes the case for taking up less space.  Psychologist Dan Gilbert challenges the idea that we’ll be miserable if we don’t get what we want.  Brother David Steindl-Rast reflects on slowing down, looking where you’re going, and being grateful.

  • Friday, August 8, 2014 1:26am

    Violence and brutality are grim realities of life. So why are some people violent, and others aren’t? Are some of us born that way, or can anyone be pushed into committing acts of cruelty? What would it take for an ordinary person to become violent? In this hour, TED speakers explore the sinister side of human nature, and whether we’re all capable of violence. Psychologist Philip Zimbardo tells the story of his notorious Stanford Prison experiment and how easy it is for people to turn violent. Neuroscientist Jim Fallon uncovers the wiring of a psychopathic killer. Writer Leslie Morgan Steiner tells the harrowing story of her abusive relationship, and shares why victims of domestic violence often don’t leave. Psychology professor Steven Pinker charts the whole of human history, and says we are living in the most peaceful time in our existence.

  • Friday, August 1, 2014 1:03am

    As adults, we experience childhood as a series of flashbacks. And those memories — however few and faulty — form the foundation of who we are. In this hour, TED speakers reflect on how our upbringing shapes us.  Tinkering School Founder Gever Tulley says that when kids are given sharp tools and matches, their imaginations take off and they become better problem-solvers.   Journalist Jennifer Senior argues that the goal of raising happy children is so elusive that it has put modern, middle-class parents into a panic. Poet and playwright Lemn Sissay was raised by the state; he talks about the empty space where his family should have been. Writer Andrew Solomon dives into his childhood to describe moments of great adversity, and how they helped him forge an identity.