Marketplace

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Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program—with an irreverent reporting style all its own—airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television. In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

Big banks team up to create digital currency

8 hours ago

On today's show, we'll talk about a decline in stock market volatility over the summer; a collaboration between four big banks to create an alternative to Bitcoin; a labor ruling that's granted graduate students from private colleges the right to unionize; and the return of Fugitive Tech CEO Kobi Alexander to the U.S. 

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Grace Hood

In Colorado, nothing quite says summer like a rafting trip down thrilling rapids. In the southwestern town of Durango, hundreds sign up for trips in July and August.

On a late June afternoon, Dylan and Elizabeth Burton from Washington stepped out from the Animas River in Durango riding a rush of adrenaline. “Perfect, beautiful, fantastic in every way possible,” Dylan Burton said.

KFC releases fried-chicken scented sunscreen

Aug 23, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

Some of you will remember that time KFC decided to release fried chicken-flavored nail polish a while back. The restaurant chain is out with another non-edible fried chicken product — I'm just gonna let this speak for itself, you decide:

Best Buy beats expectations big time

Aug 23, 2016

Best Buy had a monster day on Wall Street Tuesday, with the stock closing up 20 percent. This came after the electronics retailer reported much better than expected results, including a 21 percent jump in profit. Appliance and consumer electronics sales were especially strong.

This surprised investors and it probably surprised non-investors as well, given the constant talk of Amazon crushing brick and mortar retailers. Best Buy, which is 50 years old this week, hasn’t gone the way of RadioShack or Circuit City.

With Trump, the more he tells us, the less we know

Aug 23, 2016
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Adam Allington

Presidential candidates here in the United States are required to disclose the sources of their income to the FEC. That doesn’t mean however that we get a full picture of their total wealth. Never has this been truer than with a candidate like Donald Trump.

Trump has a stake in over 540 separate entities, everything from golf courses to hotels, to vineyards, even a modeling agency. That is according to a 104-page personal financial disclosure form.

Paris begins construction of urban refugee camp

Aug 23, 2016
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Emma Jacobs

The city of Paris has started construction on a pair of urban refugee camps, which will provide modular shelters for more than 1,000 people.  The city hopes the project, announced by Mayor Anne Hidalgo in May, will help to eliminate tent cities that have emerged in public spaces throughout Paris.

How Angela Merkel and Theresa May are the same

Aug 23, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

Germany, thanks in no small part to Chancellor Angela Merkel, has become a leader in Europe.

The county's been at the heart of negotiations on Greece's debt, the refugee crisis and now what to do about Brexit.

Just yesterday, Merkel set off on a weeklong Post-Brexit tour of Europe, where she'll meet with leaders to discuss a plethora of policies.

Ken Lenox is a 5th generation cattle rancher in Rolla, Missouri with more than 50 years’ experience in the business.  We checked in with Lenox every so often and today we talked about price fluctuations in the cattle market and how his herd is doing this year. 

To hear the full interview, use the audio player above.

The price of the EpiPen has surged. Who pays?

Aug 23, 2016
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Kim Adams

The start of the school year can be an expensive time for parents, but for parents of kids with severe allergies, it’s been an even more expensive shopping trip in recent years. They also have to buy emergency auto-injectors,  and the price of the main one on the market, EpiPen, has skyrocketed.

Marketplace for Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Aug 23, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

Angela Merkel became one of the most influential world leaders today and how she might proceed post-Brexit; Paris has started construction on its first urban refugee camp — what effect this will have on the city's homeless refugee population; and what does the requirement that presidential candidates disclose their personal finances mean for Donald Trump in this election? 

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Gigi Douban

People who buy individual health plans through the federal exchange in Alabama might soon see a big premium jump, anywhere from 26 to 41 percent over last year. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama, soon to be the state’s only health insurance provider, has proposed the rate hike to take effect in 2017. 

Tranquility in the US stock market

Aug 23, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about a stock market calm as August winds down; a possible jump in premiums for Alabama health plans; and Tekserve's decision to auction off its antique collection. 

The business of building sandcastles

Aug 22, 2016
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Andy Uhler

Sandcastles have been around a while. In the 1970's, a couple of guys even started an organization called Sand Sculptors International — sort of the de-facto source for sandcastle standards.

Marketplace for Monday, August 22, 2016

Aug 22, 2016
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Caitlin Esch

A look at what welfare dollars are being spent on now and how life has changed for those on welfare, 20 years after welfare reform; European Union's deal with Turkey over migration could be in jeopardy in the aftermath of the country's recent attempted coup; why Donald Trump's supporter base of disaffected white male voters are angry and what it might mean for the election.

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Donna Tam

The sponsors of Olympian swimmer Ryan Lochte are distancing themselves from the athlete after his bizarre robbery scandal in Rio.

Speedo officially announce today that it is dropping its endorsement deal, choosing instead to donate a portion of Lochte’s $50,000 fee to a Brazilian children’s charity.

Turkey — EU tensions threaten refugee deal

Aug 22, 2016
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Sam Beard

One of the casualties of last month’s failed coup in Turkey and its aftermath could be Ankara’s migration deal with the European Union. Turkish President Recep Teyyip Erdogan promise to cut the flow of hundreds thousands of refugees and migrants from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran and other countries in the Middle East and Africa who were flooding across the Aegean Sea from Turkey to Greece.

In return,  the EU agreed to grant Turks visa-free travel throughout the 28 nation bloc but only if Turkey cleaned up its conduct on human rights. 

ChemChina one step closer to acquiring Syngenta

Aug 22, 2016
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Andy Uhler

The U.S. Committee on Foreign Investment approved ChemChina's purchase of Syngenta – a Swiss agribusiness company. The deal, which was first announced in February, had some worried about the national security implications of the Chinese owning a seed company that sees a quarter of its revenue in the United States. 

Deciphering the future of interest rate hikes

Aug 22, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about ChemChina's plans to buy the Swiss company Syngenta; the Federal Reserve's interest rate plans; an earlier FAFSA filing date; and how some well-known brands are helping out those displaced by the Louisiana floods. 

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Donna Tam

Ramen noodles are now the currency of choice in prison, according to a year-long study of one state penitentiary.

Big Pharma's competition to buy new cancer drugs

Aug 22, 2016

Pfizer announced on Monday that it will pay $14 billion to acquire Medivation, the company behind the prostate cancer drug Xtandi. The purchase will help make Pfizer a stronger presence in the lucrative cancer drug business, with the possibility of expanding Xtandi to breast cancer treatment.

The legacy of welfare reform, 20 years later

Aug 22, 2016
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Caitlin Esch

When Marketplace’s Wealth and Poverty team started reporting on welfare reform almost a year ago, our goal was to follow the money. We wanted to know how federal welfare dollars were spent and to what impact. 

The answers involved nine months of digging deep into Excel spreadsheets, government contracts and state budgets, and the result was season one of our new podcast The Uncertain Hour. We not only learned about where the money went, but the effect this reform, enacted in 1996, has had on our country.

Ruby Duncan: The Activist

Aug 22, 2016

Ed note: After President Bill Clinton signed a bill that “ended welfare as we know it” in 1996, major changes occurred in who could receive cash assistance and how states could spend their welfare money. We explore the uncertainties of welfare in the first season of  The Uncertain Hour podcast.  Along the way, we met a lot of people who changed, or were changed by, welfare.

In Japan, seniors are half of all welfare recipients

Aug 22, 2016
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Adam Allington

Some experts say we have what amounts to a “retirement funding crisis” here in the United States. That, given longer lifespans, many retirees aren’t able to get by on savings and Social Security alone.

Well, seniors in Japan are also struggling, and in many cases the situation is much worse.

As of March, people 65 or older now account for more than half of all households living on welfare.

The situation is the result of several pieces of bad news, which economist Matthew Goodman at the Center for Strategic and International Studies describes as the “three Ds.”

Weekly Wrap: Jobs, oil and markets

Aug 19, 2016

Joining us to talk about the week's business and economic news are Sudeep Reddy of the Wall Street Journal and Linette Lopez from Business Insider. This week, they discuss a hopeful report on middle-income jobs from the Fed the upcoming OPEC meeting.

What visual albums say about today's music industry

Aug 19, 2016
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Sabri Ben-Achour

If you haven't been waiting for Frank Ocean's first new album in four years, you probably know someone who has. Or maybe you found out about the whole thing when your Twitter blew itself up last night over Ocean’s new 45-minute-long "video album." It's called "Endless" and is available, at least now, only on Apple Music.

Ocean's taking a page from Beyonce, who did the same thing with "Lemonade," which debuted on HBO and then was released exclusively on the streaming service Tidal. That's the one co-owned by her husband, Jay Z. 

Team Trump unleashes its first TV ad

Aug 19, 2016
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Gigi Douban

Make no mistake: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has gotten a lot of air time, especially for a candidate who's spent zero on TV ads. Well, zero until now. Trump's first ad of the 2016 election hits swing-state TVs today. 

Oakland, California, might be the center of gentrification

Aug 19, 2016
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Molly Wood and Hayley Hershman

Oakland, California, is a textbook example of the effects of gentrification.

Tech Intervention: Slow it down a little, Volvo

Aug 19, 2016
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Molly Wood

You probably heard the news that Uber plans to start testing autonomous cars in Pittsburgh as soon as the end of the month, using a fleet of semi-autonomous Volvo XC90 vehicles. 

The high cost of constructing affordable housing

Aug 19, 2016
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Molly Wood

Bloomberg reporter Patrick Clark said in a recent article that despite high demand, developers aren’t racing to build affordable housing because it’s very difficult to make money on these projects. Clark explores potential solutions to the housing shortage, but also asks what it might mean for cities and working-class folks if there isn’t enough affordable housing to go around.

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Molly Wood

What comes after self-driving cars? Self-driving trucks. The impact these autonomous vehicles could have on our economy is pretty significant.

In a recent Vox article, David Roberts explains how self-driving trucks could result in 1.8 million truck drivers losing their jobs. Roberts explains to Molly Wood that these trucking jobs are one of the last, solidly middle-class jobs that do not require a college degree. 

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