Marketplace

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Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program—with an irreverent reporting style all its own—airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television. In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

Molly Wood

Most people aren't paying for things with their phones just yet. If you are, maybe you're just getting used to using your fingerprint to authorize a transaction.

MasterCard is blazing right ahead with an app that will let you pay for items with your face.

Technically, you pay using your MasterCard, obviously. But to authorize your mobile payment, you look at your camera's selfie cam and blink once to prove you're a human.

The FCC is busy enforcing net neutrality

12 hours ago
Molly Wood

The Federal Communications Commission has now been in the business of enforcing net neutrality for a little less than a month and it's been busy. The FCC promptly fined AT&T $100 million for throttling some users unlimited data access. Sprint said it would stop doing the same thing now that the new rules are in effect. 

One formal net neutrality complaint has already been filed, and businesses and the government are trying to figure out what the Internet service game looks like now.

Molly Wood

It’s a holiday weekend, but there's still news to unpack before the Fourth of July barbecues can get started. Catherine Rampell from the Washington Post and Sudeep Reddy from the Wall Street Journal join Molly for this installment of the Weekly Wrap.

In the headlines:

The University of Washington lowers its tuition.

Marketplace for Friday, July 3, 2015

15 hours ago

On today's show wrap up: the week's business news, a look at Phil Knight's impact on Nike, and we contemplate a massive heath care merger. Plus: a conversation with FCC chair Tom Wheeler and the new Battle of the Alamo.

PODCAST: Theme park traffic

22 hours ago
David Brancaccio

On today's show, more on the shrinking stock market in Shanghai, which took a tumble today. Plus, we're headed into the thick of theme park season, and around the country-parks are adding new attractions, scarier rollar coasters, and wilder rides. We take a closer look at the role of a new ride in driving theme park traffic.

Marketplace Morning Report for Friday, July 3, 2015

23 hours ago
Marketplace

Airing on Friday, July 3, 2015: With Greeks heading to the polls on Sunday, the IMF is saying Greece needs $66 billion over the next and more flexibility from its lenders. More on that. Plus ... they’re back! And they’ve got their eyes on you. In an effort to reduce “shrinkage”, aka shoplifting, Wal-Mart brings greeters back to the front of the store. Seems that simple act of being seen and greeted as you walk into a store, may cut down on your urge to take a five-finger discount.

What's holding back wearable tech?

23 hours ago
Nova Safo

Personal health and wellness technologies are projected to be a $5 billion business this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association

Even President Barack Obama wears a wearable wellness device — a Fitbit — on occasion.

But, as it turns out, wearable technologies have a big obstacle to overcome: sensors — the miniaturized devices that measure things like speed and motion.

Philadelphia: the largest city to legalize Airbnb

23 hours ago
Gigi Douban

Philadelphia has legalized Airbnb and agreed to tax rentals booked through the site. The city is preparing itself for two huge events — The 2016 Democratic National Convention a year from now. But first up, the pope’s visit.

According to Philadelphia’s tourism bureau, more than 1.5 million visitors are expected to descend on the city for the Papal event.

Walmart brings greeters back to the front door

23 hours ago
Amy Scott

If you’re planning on shopping at a Wal-Mart on this holiday, you may encounter a throwback from the company’s past. The Wal-Mart greeter is making a comeback at the front of some stores. In about 300 of its 4,500 stores, the company is testing a new program to cut down on theft.

Marketplace Tech for Friday, July 3, 2015

23 hours ago
Marketplace

Airing Friday, July 3, 2015: We hear a lot about wearable technologies like the iPhone and how they will change our lives, but little on what it will take to do that. As it turns out there’s one big obstacle: sensors. Plus, how well have you kept up with the week in tech news? It's time for Silicon Tally! This week, host Ben Johnson takes on Brad Jenkins, Managing Director of Funny or Die’s DC office for a government-themed quiz.

When "internet famous" turns into just "famous"

Jul 3, 2015
Tony Wagner and Tobin Low

$20 million

Marketplace for Thursday, July 2, 2015

Jul 2, 2015

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: One of Chicago's remaining black-owned banks is in danger of closing, a reality that's part of a national trend. Unlike the more segregated days when these banks were founded, African-American customers can now take their business elsewhere. But black-owned banks provide a link to a proud history, and research says, they may do something a lot more important. Marketplace's Dan Weissmann has the story. Next: forget the baking soda volcano.

Richard Nixon 'wanted to be a good prince'

Jul 2, 2015
Kai Ryssdal, Mukta Mohan and Daisy Palacios

Nobody includes Richard Nixon on their list of the country’s best presidents, but Nixon had a lasting impact both politically and economically. Author Evan Thomas looks at the psyche of this anxious introvert and takes readers deep into Nixon’s mind in his latest book "Being Nixon: A Man Divided."

Black-owned banks are dying. Here's why it matters.

Jul 2, 2015
Dan Weissmann

Just three years ago, Chicago had four black-owned banks. Now there are two, and regulators have told one of them — Illinois Service Federal Savings and Loan— to raise more capital or risk a shutdown. The decline is part of a national trend.

Univision plans its IPO

Jul 2, 2015
Adrienne Hill

We direct your attention now to Securities and Exchange Commission form S-1, officially titled a Registration Statement Under the Securities Act of 1933, filed today by Univision Holdings. The country's biggest Spanish-language broadcaster is going public. No word yet on how many shares it'll offer or what those shares might cost.

Jobs report in 4 charts: who's working, who's not

Jul 2, 2015
Tracey Samuelson

The economy added a couple hundred thousand jobs in June — 223,000 if you’re counting — and the employment rate dropped slightly, to 5.3 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Bubble wrap abandoning its signature pop

Jul 2, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Take a moment to mourn the simplest of childhood pleasures: popping bubble wrap.

The Wall Street Journal reports that there's a new version set to hit the market.

It's called — for some completely indecipherable reason — iBubble Wrap.

And sadly, it won't pop.

BP reaches $18.7 billion settlement over 2010 spill

Jul 2, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Scott Tong

The final tab for BP — five years after the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history — just got a whole lot more clear. The company settled with the federal government and five Gulf Coast states for $18.7 billion dollars on Thursday. That money will go towards environmental damage, legal penalties and state economic claims.

In all, BP’s total liability will exceed $40 billion dollars. So the question is, is the oil industry safer today?

Janet Nguyen

Coding boot camp students may want to get in the financial aid line. The Department of Education is considering making Pell Grants available to them.

The experimental program, which is still in the planning stages, would enable accredited colleges to “contract out entire programs” to coding boot camps that teach programming skills, allowing their students to receive the need-based grants.

Why do some movies open early?

Jul 2, 2015
Tony Wagner

We're smack in the middle of summer movie season. Superheroes, dinosaurs and potty-mouthed teddy bears are duking it out at the box office, while rock monsters, secret agents and a vogue-ing Channing Tatum wait in the wings.

Heading into the holiday weekend, listener Erich Arabejo wrote in with this question:

"I've always wondered why movie studios release their movies on Fridays but start them on Thursdays or Wednesdays if it's a potential blockbuster hit."

What's your financial legacy?

Jul 2, 2015
Marketplace Weekend Staff

Next week, we're talking about legacies on the show. We want to hear your stories of financial legacies: what's your legacy? How will you be remebered? Maybe you have a legacy without an heir, maybe you're building something for your future....

We want to know. Tell us about the economic legacies in your life.

U.S. Army recruits young innovators

Jul 2, 2015
Amy Scott

In a hotel in suburban Baltimore, kids file into a conference room wearing Army-issued white lab coats and safety goggles. The middle schoolers are among the finalists in the U.S. Army’s annual eCYBERMISSION STEM fair—20 teams selected from more than 7,000 around the country for their problem-solving projects.

Before the big competition, they break into small groups for some training.

PODCAST: Rice in Cuba

Jul 2, 2015
David Brancaccio

It would appear people are dropping out of the American labor force in spite of new jobs created. More on that. Plus, as the U.S. announces plans to open a full embassy in Cuba, we look at the American rice industry, which is poised to benefit from more normalized relations, and ask how they’re preparing for changes ahead between the two countries. And with the Greek economy nearly immobilized by its debt, and Puerto Rico close to default, does the U.S. have lessons to learn from these situations? Marketplace's senior economics correspondent Chris Farrell weighs in.

Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: Major U.S. airlines are the subject of a federal investigation by the Department of Justice looking into whether they may be illegally coordinating to keep ticket prices up. More on that. Plus, we'll talk about New York City's ban on so-called “poor doors,” the separate entrances to mixed-income buildings that were to be used by lower-income residents. Plus, a conversation with Elizabeth Holmes, who at 31 is the youngest female, self-made multi-billionaire in America, according to Forbes.

U.S. rice growers want to get in on Cuba

Jul 2, 2015
Tracey Samuelson

The U.S. will open an embassy in Havana — so said President Barack Obama Tuesday, a significant step showing that efforts to normalize relations with Cuba are ticking along. However, the embargo still stands, and only Congress can lift it. Should that happen, many U.S. exporters will stand to benefit, including American rice farmers.

Ray Stoesser grows about 4,000 to 5,000 acres of rice on his Texas farm and would very much like to see some of it head to Cuba.

Marketplace Tech for Thursday, July 2, 2015

Jul 2, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: First up, we'll talk with Nathaniel Popper, author of "Digital Gold: Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money," about whether or not the banking crisis in Greece is good for Bitcoin. And Matt Novak, who writes Gizmodo’s Paleofuture blog, joins us to talk about Back to the Future: Part 2 and the origins of our obsession with hoverboards.

Bubble wrap just doesn't burst like it used to

Jul 2, 2015
Tony Wagner and Tobin Low

223,000

That's how many U.S. jobs were added in June, with the unemployment rate declining to 5.3 percent, as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. But as the New York Times reports, economists have pointed out that the unemployment rate fell for the wrong reason: people exiting the workforce.

$1.9 billion

Donna Karan leaves behind a fashion legacy

Jul 1, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Daisy Palacios

Over the last two decades, Donna Karan International has been one of the biggest brands in the fashion industry. Founder and chief designer Donna Karan announced on Tuesday that she was leaving her namesake company to focus on other projects.

Fashion journalist Kate Betts says that Karan has left a clear impact in the world of fashion.

“She designed for women in a way that was very sensuous and much more feminine than previous looks for women,” Betts says.  “It was a revelation for many professional women.”

Marketplace for Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Jul 1, 2015

Airing on Wednesday, July 1, 2015: Puerto Rico is in dire financial straits.  So what, you might shrug. Well, if any of your money is invested in a municipal bond fund, you might own Puerto Rican bonds, and they could take a hit. Marketplace's Adam Allington finds out who’s vulnerable. Next: Speaking today in Tennessee, President Obama will try to court conservative states to expand Medicaid under Obamacare. We unpack his sales pitch on using federal dollars to help states’ bottom lines.

The Obamacare sales pitch

Jul 1, 2015
D Gorenstein

It’s been almost a week since the Supreme Court’s momentous ruling that further cements the Affordable Care Act as the law of the land, and Wednesday President Barack Obama flew to Nashville, Tennessee, to talk about health care.

While some consider this a bit of a victory lap, the president’s choice of Tennessee suggests it’s much more of an overture.

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