Marketplace

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Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program—with an irreverent reporting style all its own—airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television. In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

The secret work life of bees

12 hours ago
Kai Ryssdal and Mukta Mohan

The USDA estimates that honey bees are worth $15 billion a year in agricultural value. The bee is responsible for as much as one in every three mouthfuls of food that we eat.

Marketplace for Tuesday, June 30, 2015

13 hours ago

Airing on Tuesday, June 30, 2015: Puerto Rico is in dire financial straits, with its governor saying it cannot pay its $72 billion in debt. He wants to defer payments and negotiate with creditors. We look at what Puerto Rico's options. Next: President Obama announced Tuesday that he will update labor rules to allow workers extra pay for work beyond 40 hours.

Facing huge debt, Puerto Rico weighs its options

13 hours ago
Nova Safo

Puerto Rico's legislature plans to vote on a budget proposal on Tuesday that would cut hundreds of millions of dollars in spending, in an effort to stave off a looming debt crisis that is larger, by several factors, than the one that bankrupted the city of Detroit.

Unlike Detroit, the U.S. territory cannot declare bankruptcy, because it is treated like a state under federal bankruptcy law.

Londoner crowdfunding cash for Greek bailout

13 hours ago
Kai Ryssdal

Here's the latest entry in "Hey, let's see if we can crowdfund this thing." 

There's a new account on Indiegogo called the "Greek Bailout Fund" set up by Thom Feeney, a 29-year-old from East London.  

Here's an excerpt from the page

University of Phoenix to shrink enrollment

13 hours ago
Amy Scott

One of the biggest colleges in the country is about to get a lot smaller. The University of Phoenix has announced plans to close programs, shrink its enrollment and introduce new admissions requirements for students.

The entire for-profit college industry has been under pressure for years now, as lawmakers, regulators and student advocates have pushed back against a business model that left many students deep in debt — often without degrees to show for it.

Scott Tong

President Obama proposed Tuesday to expand overtime eligibility to salaried workers. Currently, fewer than one in 10 workers qualify, but the proposal would boost that to four in 10.

Under the current rules, salaried workers making more than $23,660 a year are ineligible for overtime pay, under federal law. The White House plan would boost the threshold to any worker making up to $50,440.

Pushing back against a new wave of piracy

13 hours ago
Sam Harnett

It's popcorn time, and the TV and film industry doesn't like it.

Popcorn Time is one of many new programs that allow users to stream movies without paying for them, causing serious concern in the movie industry (Netflix says piracy has become one of its biggest competitors).

When users log onto Popcorn Time, they can stream a bunch of old and new movies and TV shows. They can watch any of the titles with just one click, or swipe of a finger. There's now even a Popcorn Time app so users can watch stuff on tablets and phones. 

Which music streaming service should you get?

14 hours ago
Meg Cramer and Tony Wagner

The Greek debt crisis by the numbers

15 hours ago
Marketplace staff

The need-to-know numbers about the Greek debt crisis, explained by Paddy Hirsch.

Produced by Preditorial | www.preditorial.tv

Writer and Host: Paddy Hirsch

Director and Edtor: Rick Kent

Director of Photography: Anton Seim

Producer: Mimi Kent

PODCAST: Greek credit cards

23 hours ago
David Brancaccio

Greece and the faulty assumption that everyone has access to a credit card. We'll check in on how Greek citizens are handling the banks being shutdown there. Plus, the Export-Import Bank’s charter expires at midnight Wednesday: we look at how this leaves it in an awkward state of limbo. And Apple's new music streaming service launches today. We'll talk about what to expect.

Airing on Tuesday, June 30, 2015: Banks are rationing cash, European creditors are closing in — Sounds like the current situation in Greece. But that was Cyprus, two years ago. What was learned and will Greece heed any of those lessons? Plus, President Barack Obama is moving to make millions more Americans eligible for overtime pay. More on that. And in Nairobi, Kenya, an upscale mall attacked by terrorists is preparing to reopen. Kenyan officials plan to reopen part of the mall on Wednesday, but as we find out, not everyone is happy about it. 

Conversations about mobility, live from Aspen

Jun 29, 2015
Marketplace staff

Monday's Marketplace was broadcast live from the Belly Up in Aspen, Colorado, and the Aspen Ideas Festival. We took a break from the usual Marketplace format for a series of conversations all around one theme: mobility and the economy.

Economic mobility (or lack thereof) in Greece (starts at 01:10)

First things first: we had to talk about Greece. The European Central Bank froze funding to Greek banks. As the latest deadline for the country looms over its creditors and citizens, tensions are understandably high.

SCOTUS rules against EPA regulations

Jun 29, 2015
Alberta Cross, Adrienne Hill and Scott Tong

The Supreme Court handed President Barack Obama two victories last week: the Affordable Care Act will keep its subsidies and same-sex marriage became legal in all 50 states. But in a 5-4 decision on Monday, the Supreme Court decided against the Environmental Prote

Marketplace for Monday, June 29, 2015

Jun 29, 2015

Airing on Monday, June 29, 2015: Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal is bringing the news to you from the Aspen Ideas Festival. First: Kai talks to David Leonhardt of the New York Times about the breaking news of the day and what it has to do with mobility. Plus: mountaineer Chris Davenport and Ted Sarandos, Netflix chief content officer, talk to Kai about the mobility of content and competition.

Europeans take refuge in gold

Jun 29, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Let's circle back to the lack of mobility Greeks and their money are dealing with right now.

Bloomberg News is reporting that Europeans have been buying gold — traditionally the safest of safe havens — at quite a clip this month.

The U.K. Royal Mint says sales of gold coins to Greeks was "double the five-month average in June." 

PODCAST: Cameras in the workplace

Jun 29, 2015
David Brancaccio

With the Greek public being asked to vote on Sunday to approve or reject the terms of the EU's latest financial bailout, the immediate question is how to keep the economy going between now and then. More on that. Plus, we'll talk about the case before the Supreme Court involving Environmental Protection Agency regulations of power plant emissions. And Police departments all over the country are frantically ordering body-cams and dash-cams for their patrol officers these days.

Puerto Rico faces debt deadline

Jun 29, 2015
Sabri Ben-Achour

Puerto Rico is staring down a deadline on July 1st when some of its $72.3 billion in public debt will come due. There’s the $630 million payment on general obligation bonds, and the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority owes money on its $9 billion debt.  

Afghanistan increases opium production

Jun 29, 2015
Nova Safo

The United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime says in a new report that global opium production has reached record levels not seen since the 1930s, mainly due to increased cultivation in Afghanistan.

Thomas Pietschmann, co-author of the U.N. report, says it is meant as a warning that the world is sitting on vast amounts of opium, not all of which has reached drug users.

Marketplace Tech for Monday, June 29, 2015

Jun 29, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Monday, June 29, 2015: First up, we'll talk with Alex White, CEO and cofounder of Nextbigsound, on how music streaming services are changing people’s listening habit. Plus, as video-cams get better and cheaper, we'll explore how they are spreading into a lot of workplaces unrelated to policing. We'll also talk about mini-drones by air, land, and sea. Listen to learn more.

Video cameras spread to more workplaces

Jun 29, 2015
Mitchell Hartman

Police departments all over the country are ordering body-cams and dash-cams for their patrol officers these days as they face pressure to monitor how officers treat civilians.

Those tiny video cameras, meanwhile, are spreading into a lot of workplaces that have nothing to do with police officers and guns.

McDonald's on a McBike

Jun 29, 2015
Tony Wagner and Tobin Low

$72.3 billion

Jeff Tyler

As the number of people living on the streets has risen and homeless encampments have spread across Southern California, the Los Angeles City Council has worked to speed the process by which officials can collect homeless people’s possessions from sidewalks and parks.

The council approved a measure on Tuesday that would reduce the warning time the homeless are given when confiscating certain items from 72 hours to 24. 

Marketplace for Friday, June 26, 2015

Jun 26, 2015

Airing on Friday, June 26, 2015: The Supreme Court’s 5-4 ruling expanding marriage rights to same-sex couples changes the financial landscape for gays and lesbians in the U.S. We tally the implications when it comes to taxes, federal benefits, job mobility and so on. Next: This could be another record breaking weekend at the box office, with three huge movies primed to haul in millions. Hollywood is having quite the summer and it has barely started. But can it last? Marketplace explores. 

Claw machines: The most enjoyable way to get scammed

Jun 26, 2015
Kai Ryssdal, Mukta Mohan and Hayley Hershman

Phil Edwards has loved playing the claw machine since he was a child. It was this love that led him to look into how these machines actually work and what makes them so tricky. He wasn’t sure at first what he’d find. 

“I thought that maybe these stuffed animals were packed really tightly, or that the claw simply didn’t work at all," he says. "But it turns out it’s a lot more insidious than that.”

The financials of same-sex marriage

Jun 26, 2015
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

The Supreme Court ruling that same-sex couples have a right to marry could bring some big financial changes.  

First, let’s talk taxes and the marriage penalty.  

How Hollywood mega-hits spread the joy

Jun 26, 2015
Adrienne Hill

It's going to be another big weekend at the box office: "Ted 2," "Jurassic World" and "Inside Out" are each expected to pull in another $50 million or more.

It’s easy to understand how the monster success of "Jurassic World" is good for Universal. And how Pixar and its parent Disney must be feeling right now about "Inside Out."  

Joy.

It turns out, a blockbuster can also inspire joy in the theater next door. 

Weekly Wrap: GDP and Greece

Jun 26, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

 Catherine Rampell from the Washington Post and Fusion's' Felix Salmon join Kai to talk about the week's business and economic news. The big topics this week: GDP, consumer spending, Greece's financial situation and the country's relationship with the eurozone. 

Greece calling for referendum on bailout

Jun 26, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is taking it to the people.

In a speech late Friday evening, Tsipras said he's going hold a referendum on a bailout deal July 5. 

It's not quite clear which bailout package will be up for a vote, or whether the meetings scheduled for this weekend in Brussels are still going to happen.

Opportunity in America: Then and now

Jun 26, 2015
Alberta Cross

When you think of postwar America, you might think about unending opportunity and limitless optimism. Were things really as rosy as they seemed back then? And what about now? Is America still an economic promised land?

David Lazarus took these questions to Peter Cappelli, a professor of management at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School who's studied the periods at length.

Sam Beard

As he dispenses his pills and powders in his pharmacy in Athens, Giannis Dagres is counting the primary cost of his country’s economic crisis: a severe shortage of drugs.

“Almost every category of drugs: antibiotics, drugs for high blood pressure, vaccines for children. We’re running short of almost everything," he says.

Supplies are dwindling because the government has been forced to cut spending on health care. Dagres admits that the shortages make him ashamed of Greece, a nation that “claims to be a developed country.”

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