Marketplace

6-6:30
  • Hosted by

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program—with an irreverent reporting style all its own—airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television. In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

At Instagram, it's no longer hip to be square

13 hours ago
Sally Herships

Until now, if you wanted to advertise on Instagram, you were kind of boxed in.

"You needed to receive prior approval from Instagram and have rather lofty budgets in order to be appearing on their platform," says Nate Carter, managing director with eEffective, an ad agency trading desk.

Marketplace for Friday, August 28, 2015

13 hours ago

Another step in the evolution of the 21st century employee; the big, bad business of refugee smuggling; and Instagram's outside-the-box strategy.

Refugee smuggling is a big, bad business

13 hours ago
Scott Tong

Europe's refugee and migrant crisis appears to be getting worse by the day. In Austria, a truck found full of decomposed bodies is now believed to have held 71 people, including 12 women and children. The police say they were likely refugees from Syria. And an estimated 150 people drowned off the coast of Libya when a boat enroute to Italy sank.

Weekly Wrap: The stock market, oil and Janet Yellen

13 hours ago
Kai Ryssdal

Joining us to talk about the week's business and economic news are Nela Richardson from Redfin and the Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy. The big topics this week: stock market fluctuations, possible peril in China's economy, a 20-percent jump in oil prices and what is Janet Yellen thinking? 

How fear plays a role in our finances

13 hours ago
Lizzie O'Leary and Raghu Manavalan

What was your reaction when you first saw the stock market drop earlier this week? Something like this?

Despite all the advice about playing the long game when it comes to the stock market, the first reaction a lot of us have when we see all that red is fear. David Zald is a professor of psychology and psychiatry at Vanderbilt University, and it's his job to figure out what fear is and why it makes us do what we do.

China's growing, but not fast enough for some

14 hours ago
Lizzie O'Leary and Raghu Manavalan

Though China is about 6,500 miles away from the U.S., uncertainty in the Chinese economy can create big changes in ours. This past week, big drops in the Shanghai Composite stock index created a mini-panic in our own economy.

Clayton Dube, director of USC's US-China Institute, says China's reach goes beyond the United States, too: 

One photographer, 35 years of campaign history

14 hours ago
Kai Ryssdal and Mukta Mohan

Jim Cole has photographed every New Hampshire primary since 1980. He's snapped photos of everyone from George H.W. Bush sticking his head out of an airplane to the Lobsterman who ran for president in 2000. He's back at it this time around for the Associated Press.

On how to get a good shot:

Jack Lew is a fan of both Hamilton and "Hamilton."

14 hours ago
Carrie Barber and Tony Wagner

115

PODCAST: Mixed stock market indicators

16 hours ago
David Brancaccio

First: The stock market has been in flux this week, but the overall U.S. economy seems to be doing well. Are the markets actually a solid marker of an economy's health? We take a look at the relationship between the two. Next: World trade has declined, raising the question of whether we've reached peak globalization. Plus: Economist George Chouliarakis has been named Greece's interim finance minister. 

 

NLRB decision pushes 'employee' debate

17 hours ago
Kim Adams

Businesses, labor unions and pretty much everybody in between is still trying to parse out what a big decision by the National Labor Relations Board is going to mean to them.

A New Orleans Business Banks On New Connections

Aug 28, 2015
Noel King and Caitlin Esch

At McMillan's First Steps preschool, there's a big mural painted on the cafeteria wall. A smiling boy is held in the air by a doctor, a pastor and a police officer.

Plus, a guy in a Home Depot uniform.

In another city that might seem weird, but not in a city that is rebuilding. Linda McMillan, who owns First Steps, says the flooding that followed Hurricane Katrina destroyed her campus.

You can't escape the campaign ad

Aug 28, 2015
Kim Adams

The Democratic National Committee met in Minneapolis this week. Among the items on the agenda was a strategy to transform the party’s voter databases into something they can use to target online ads. Republicans are doing something similar, all in an effort to catch voters who spend more time than ever online.

For political campaigns, television ads and robocalls just aren’t enough anymore.

Gigi Douban

This week in the markets is brought to you by the letter V. That's V for VIX, V for violent swings in the market...

V ... for Volatility.

Now, you may be hoping we'll get a break from volatility after this turbulent week. Well, traders say, fuhgeddaboutit: the way things are in our new economic reality, we're likely to be hearing a lot more of the V word in coming weeks.

After all, they say, volatility is a normal part of any market. So It's hard to predict. But John Sweeney, executive vice president of retirement and investing strategies at Fidelity, has a theory.

Cadillac's one-way drive to New York and new branding

Aug 28, 2015
David Brancaccio

In New York's upscale SoHo neighborhood, workers are banging Cadillacs into shape. The construction site — on a pair of upper floors with magnificent views of the East River on one side and north to the Midtown skyscrapers on the other — is the new world headquarters of a famous brand that has, heretofore, been associated with Detroit. 

Click the above audio player to hear Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio speak with Cadillac CEO Johan de Nysschen about the car company's plans to revamp the brand. 

Marketplace Tech for Friday, August 28, 2015

Aug 28, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Friday, August 28, 2015: On today's show, a North Dakota law that allows police to use drones to deploy non-lethal weapons. Plus, on this week’s edition of Silicon Tally, Ben tries to stump Ian Bogost, professor of media studies and interactive computing at Georgia Tech, on the latest numbers in tech news. 

Living in a wildfire zone

Aug 27, 2015
Andy Uhler

Hundreds of wildfires are burning in the West. The drought that's dried out the region got the fire season started early, and so far, this is shaping up as one of the worst years ever in the Pacific Northwest.

Marketplace for Thursday, August 27, 2015

Aug 27, 2015

The fundamentals of America's economy in three numbers; China's Ironman; and living in the fire zone.

Digital assistants: If they only had a brain

Aug 27, 2015
Amy Scott

If you’ve ever used Apple's Siri, Microsoft's Cortana or another so-called “virtual assistant” on your smart phone, chances are there has been some cursing involved. That frustration has created a big opportunity for whomever can make a better one. Now Facebook is stepping into the fray on a small scale at first. For a few hundred users in the Bay Area, Facebook’s Messenger app will now come with a feature called M.

Just how strong are those fundamentals?

Aug 27, 2015
Mark Garrison

During this week’s wild ride for stocks, analysts have been telling people not to freak out because, essentially, the stock market is not the economy and vice versa. Kai Ryssdal says that on Marketplace so often that a fan built that phrase into a drinking game. (Which, by the way, is not to be played while driving!)

China's Wanda buys Ironman race series

Aug 27, 2015
Kim Adams

The Ironman triathlon competition has just been swallowed up by the Chinese conglomerate Dalian Wanda Group.

Singing the 'Happy Birthday' blues

Aug 27, 2015
Carrie Barber

$100,000

Flores-Roux is a nose ahead in the perfume business

Aug 27, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

Rodrigo Flores-Roux, head perfumer at Givaudan perfumes, says that “a perfumer’s life is a little bit busy.” That explains why his office is covered in perfume bottles — some professionally packaged, others in clinical bottles titled with a label maker. Magazines, postcards and photos fill up the rest of the space.

It’s all inspiration for when Flores-Roux sits down to create a scent. The first step usually involves a computer and a process that he says resembles creating a recipe.

Brian Chesky of Airbnb on "the worst idea ever"

Aug 27, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

The first step in starting a successful business is having a good idea, but sometimes even a bad one can work. Brian Chesky started Airbnb on the risky premise that people would agree to open their homes to strangers, and it worked. He didn’t just build a $10 billion company, he changed culture as we know it, helping to usher in the sharing economy.

PODCAST: Happy birthday, now cut me a check

Aug 27, 2015
David Brancaccio

First up: market's seem to be mellowing slightly, but that doesn't mean we're out of the volatile, volatile woods. We look at what that could mean for interest rates. Next, financial planners are telling people to stay the course and think about the long term, but what if you don't have that kind of time? Finally, you can sing the "Happy Birthday" song all you want but be careful about putting it in that screenplay you're working on. Believe it or not, the copyright is owned by Warner/Chappell Music, and they've been known to charge six figures for its use.

Kai Ryssdal

Airing on Thursday, August 27, 2015: What recent market volatility means for the stewards of the Federal Reserve descending on Jackson Hole, Wyoming, this week  for their annual retreat. China cracks down on warehouse executives at the center of the Tianjin explosion. Plus, a conversation about urban planning in New Orleans and how the city's innovative approach to parking reduces congestion and creates more opportunities for local businesses. 

Marketplace Tech for Wednesday, August 27, 2015

Aug 27, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, August 27, 2015: On today's show,  gaming retailer GameStop reports earnings. The world's largest personal asset manager, BlackRock,  is turning to robots to give clients financial advise. Plus, a conversation with a security researcher in Australia who may change the way you think about the Ashley Madison data hack. 

How volatile is the market? Let's consult the VIX

Aug 26, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

The Volatility Index (VIX) measures whether or not there’s too much fear or optimism in the markets. Robert Whaley, father of the VIX, says at the “beginning of the week it was about at a level of 12, at the end of the week it was at 28. That was the biggest percentage increase the VIX has ever had in its entire history.”

Currently, the VIX is around 34 percent. But what exactly does that mean? “It’s a measure of the volatility you expect over the next 30 days,” Whaley says. He adds that the VIX is usually around 20 percent.

No worries on China's streets

Aug 26, 2015
Kai Ryssdal, Rob Schmitz and Hayley Hershman

The Yuan devaluation and China’s market crash has caused global chaos. But Rob Schmitz, Marketplace’s China correspondent in Shanghai, says people on the street in China really aren’t that worried. A Sichuan restaurant owner told Schmitz “that business is really good.”

“Most importantly [China’s] got a growing economy," Schmitz says. "We've seen the headlines this week about China’s market crash ... [but] China’s economy is continuing to grow at around 6 or 7 percent, faster than nearly every other economy in the world.”

No, the economy is not like a roller coaster

Aug 26, 2015
Sam Weiner

When the market goes wild, people say the economy is like a roller coaster. And, frankly, I am sick and tired of this disgusting comparison. Someone has got to stick up for the inventor of roller coasters, my grandfather, Dr. Johann T. Rollercoaster.

And yes, laugh at his name if you must. It was changed at Ellis Island from the original Rollercoasterstein.

How Nevada could cast a shadow over solar

Aug 26, 2015
Scott Tong

A big bet on solar energy may be about to go sour in Nevada. State regulators are considering a utility's proposal to charge owners of rooftop solar systems a monthly fee for being connected to the grid.

That kind of fee, called a demand charge, would take the savings out of solar for most homeowners, undermining the business model of solar companies. Utilities in several states are pressing for similar charges. One big solar installer, Vivint Solar, has already stopped doing business in Nevada because of the uncertainty.

Pages