Marketplace

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Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program—with an irreverent reporting style all its own—airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television. In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

One of coal’s last strongholds is under review

20 hours ago

The coal industry is suffering these days. And regardless of campaign promises, it’s unlikely the Trump administration will be able to do much to bring coal back to its glory days. Fracking and natural gas are just too competitive an energy source. There are still some areas, though, where coal’s so cheap, it holds its own: coal leases on federal land. Now, recent recommendations about that program could make even those spots less viable. 

Will Trump finally dump the estate tax?

20 hours ago

Estate-tax repeal has been a priority of the Republican Party for years. That’s a tax on estates worth $5.45 million or more. President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team has said his administration would aim to roll back the tax as part of a larger package of tax cuts. How likely is that repeal and what would it mean for the deficit? 

Trump takes aim at NATO

20 hours ago

In interviews with European newspapers this weekend, President-elect Donald Trump slammed NATO. He said the military defense partnership is important to him, but he called the 70-year old alliance "obsolete." He says it's too divorced from the fight against terrorism. But not all experts see it that way.

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Molly Wood

Depending on who you ask, the fifth generation wireless networks (5G) will either herald a totally new era of connected technologies, or just make the internet on our phones a little faster.

At CES, the huge technology trade show in Las Vegas earlier this month, the mood about 5G was good. Mobile chip maker Qualcomm was among the companies making announcements related to 5G. So while I was there, I sat down with Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf, and I asked him why 5G could be so much more than just faster internet on your phone.

Sleeping like a baby is a $325 million industry

Jan 16, 2017
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Jenny Gold

Lindsay Barrick and her husband  had been trying to get their baby Arlo down for his nap for almost an hour.

“He sounds so miserable,” said Barrick, bouncing her screaming infant up and down. “I know, if you just would go to sleep you'd feel better!”

It would definitely make Arlo’s parents feel better. Since this adorable red-haired baby was born three months ago, they haven’t gotten much sleep.  The previous night, Barrick and her husband Jerry Talkington, who live in Oakland, Calif.,  were up three separate times with Arlo.

1/16/2017: It's Inauguration week

Jan 16, 2017
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Marketplace

Welcome to Inauguration week! On this MLK Day we're looking at three themes of President-elect Donald Trump's campaign: An obsolete NATO, rolling back the estate tax and bringing back coal jobs. We'll talk about the state of all three and how Trump might act on them after he's sworn in Friday. Plus: a chat with the CEO of Qualcomm and how getting your kid to sleep became a $325 million industry.

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Sam Harnett

The desire for increased productivity in Silicon Valley is spawning a new market, for substances under the heading “nootropics.”

Nootropics are marketed as pills that will increase your productivity and boost your brain power. Many in the scientific community question the claims. But in Silicon Valley, nootropics have become part of a subculture that is trying to work as many productive hours a day as possible.

Like many who take nootropics, Daniel Wiggins works in tech. “It started about nine months ago when I was working on my own startup,” Wiggins said.

Why are investors punishing the pound?

Jan 16, 2017

The British pound's sizable fall on Monday; pushback against the World Economic Forum; and the rise of food insecurity on college campuses.

 

MLK Day has become a day of service for many. Those that are off may take the time to volunteer. For others, their employers may provide a day for annual volunteering, a benefit that is especially attractive to younger workers.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.


Business and political  leaders descend on the Swiss Alpine resort of Davos this week for the latest annual World Economic Forum. They do so against a backdrop of rising populism, and opposition to some of things that Davos has promoted, like globalization. Some critics have attacked the event itself as elitist and blamed it for turning U.S. and European  citizens against free trade. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.


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Jennie Cecil Moore

In Seattle, University of Washington senior Taylor Herring combines grants and part-time work to cover tuition and necessities. But toward the end of the quarter, his account gets pretty low.

“I think my second quarter here, after going through my second quarter running out of food, I was like, 'Well, do I need to buy this book?' I mean it’s so expensive, whereas later on I might need that,” Herring said.

Amazon has announced plans to add more than 100,000 full-time jobs over the next 18 months.

The news comes as U.S. companies try to burnish their credentials as a job-creator — a priority of the incoming Trump administration. Amazon’s growth isn’t a complete surprise, however, for a company expanding into so many different product categories.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

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Catherine Green

In November, Los Angeles voters committed $1.2 billion to addressing homelessness with passage of a proposition called HHH. The city's homeless population is second only to that of New York, a city twice its size. About 28,000 people are estimated to be sleeping on the streets of LA on any given night.

01/16/2017: A $50 billion eyewear merger

Jan 16, 2017
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Marketplace

Eyewear maker Luxottica — known for its Ray-Ban shades — is merging with lens maker Essilor to create a company worth $50 billion. We'll explore the future of the eyewear market and explain why a deal between these two types of companies is so unusual. Next, we'll talk about Amazon's job growth plans, and then look at how Los Angeles plans to allocate $1.2 billion of funds dedicated to the homeless. 

01/16/17: Trump TV

Jan 16, 2017
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Marketplace

The Internet Archive has launched a library of Trump's television appearances — the first of its kind for an incoming president. We'll hear from one of the archive's managing editors, Nancy Watzman, about why they created the collection and what they hope it's used for. Afterwards, we'll take a tour of of the Mercedes-Benz Stadium, a new playing venue for the Atlanta Falcons that's set to open later this year.  

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Andy Uhler

Dean Spanos, the billionaire who owns the Chargers, thinks getting into the Los Angeles market is going to pay off. But with the Rams in L.A. already, the Chargers won’t be the only NFL franchise in town. So will fans actually show up to games and spend money on yet another team’s gear?

Allen Sanderson, economics professor at the University of Chicago, said this move isn’t really about the Chargers or the Rams.

The Environmental Protection Agency announced today that it’s locking in car fuel efficiency standards set four years ago, in advance of the incoming Trump administration. The plan requires automakers to more than double their fleet-wide fuel efficiency by 2025. While a key part of President Obama’s legacy, the regulation is not all popular with the automobile industry.

For banks, there’s a delayed benefit to rising rates

Jan 13, 2017

Interest rates are rising, which tends to be good news for banks. But it looks like it'll take a little longer for them to see the benefits. In earnings announcements today, several big banks, including Bank of America, reported flat or only slightly higher margins on interest rates. So when can the banks expect to cash in?

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Hayley Hershman

No matter who you are, you've probably had a rough day at the office that changed your perspective, or maybe you made an impulse purchase you really, really wish you could take back. This week, Chris Thile, the host of "A Prairie Home Companion," took our money-inspired personality questionnaire.

You can catch "A Prairie Home Companion" on your local public radio station.

Fill in the blank: Money can't buy you happiness but it can buy you ______

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Lizzie O'Leary

This week, President-elect Donald Trump held his first press conference since July, and answered questions about his plans for his businesses. 

The brief gist: he says he's handing over control of the Trump Organization to his older sons and a business associate and putting his assets into a trust. Trump says no new foreign deals will be made, but new domestic deals are allowed and the President-elect can look at an overall profit and loss statement.

The changing balance of US-Russia relations

Jan 13, 2017
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Lizzie O'Leary and Eliza Mills

In the past few weeks, there's been a lot of news about Russia, from the DNC hacking, to the intelligence community's conversations with President elect Trump about the Kremlin.

President Obama recently issued new sanctions against against the country, and ejected 35 Russian diplomats from the United States. 

To get a better sense of the economic and political relationships between the U.S. and Russia and what might change, Marketplace Weekend reached out to Matthew Rojansky, Director of the Kennan Institute at the Wilson Center.

01/13/2017: Business conflicts? Trump has a few

Jan 13, 2017
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Marketplace

We're going long and short on private prisons and President Barack Obama's legacy as a job creator with Marketplace's Lewis Wallace and The Atlantic's Gillian White. Then, UCLA law professor Jon Michaels talks us through President-elect Donald Trump's potential conflicts of interest and Russia expert Matt Rojansky explains the economic and political relationship between the U.S. and Russia. Plus, "A Prairie Home Companion" host Chris Thile takes the Marketplace Quiz.

Globalization backlash looms over Davos forum

Jan 13, 2017
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Sam Beard

The presidential inauguration may cast a pall over the World Economic Forum at Davos in the Swiss Alps next week. The vote for Donald Trump represented a stunning rejection of  some of the core beliefs propagated at Davos: a belief in the benefits of  globalization,free trade and mass immigration. Both Trump’s victory and the vote for Brexit in the United Kingdom  have been widely seen as a slap in the face for the global political and business  elite, the very people  who will gather in the Swiss ski resort. Will they feel abashed and deflated by these two electoral setbacks?  

Leigh Gallagher of Fortune and Felix Salmon of Fusion join Kai Ryssdal to discuss the week's business and economic news. This week, they debate whether the new administration will work towards heavily slowing down Congress, if President-elect Trump really is a "tweet risk" and what might be the best thing to ask Steven Mnuchin at his congressional hearing.

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Kim Adams

The city of St. Louis is trying a new strategy to fight urban blight. A massive project to raze an entire neighborhood and turn it into a new campus for a government intelligence agency.

The $1.75 billion project will keep thousands of jobs in the city, but comes at the expense of a historically black community that remains skeptical of how much of the development will benefit them.

Advocates for the unbanked worry about the Trump era

Jan 13, 2017
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Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Nineteen year-old Roxana Mercado Rojo needed $700. She was brought to the U.S. from Bolivia as a toddler.  She’s undocumented, and decided to apply for an Obama administration program that lets people like her get temporary protection from deportation and eligibility for a work permit.  There’s a fee.  Where to get the money?

“You know, I couldn’t kinda borrow from my parents and, you know, there wasn’t anyone of trust that I can borrow from,” she said.

01/13/17: Big banks, big money

Jan 13, 2017

After the election, some of the biggest banks were able to pull in a lot of money. We'll dive into the latest market trends. Next, we'll explore complaints from the EPA that some of Fiat Chrysler's vehicles are responsible for illegal pollution. Finally, we'll talk with some political outsiders who are vying for a position in the Trump administration.

Outsiders hope for jobs in Trump administration

Jan 13, 2017
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Nancy Marshall-Genzer

David Vincent Gagne is a chief technology officer for a web development company. He's from Ormond Beach, Florida. Sergio Loya is a management consultant in Ashburn, Virginia. Gagne voted for Hillary Clinton. Loya voted for Donald Trump. But they describe themselves as political outsiders.

They both applied for jobs in the new administration. I first talked to them the week after the election.

“I think with Trump there’s a much greater chance for people that have not been in the political 'industry' to make a change in the world,” said Gagne then.

With a few banks reporting earnings Friday  — JP Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America — we'll take a look at banking’s prospects. The new Trump administration and a GOP-controlled Congress have said they plan to dial back Dodd-Frank and other financial regulations. For the most part, bank stocks – and the market overall — have done well in the months since the election. Rising interest rates are a help to banks, of course. But in the long run, how will things play out if the new administration removes banking and finance regulations?   

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Marketplace

The Justice Department announced that it would phase out the use of private prisons. But the Georgia town of McRae-Helena has staked its future on these facilities. We've visited the region to see how residents feel about their presence. And in Trump-related news, we'll look at some of the cabinet picks who have yet to be scheduled for confirmation hearings, and discuss what the future might look like for big banks during his tenure. 

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