Bird Note

3:57, right before ATC

BirdNote educates and inspires people to care about the future of the natural world.  We do this by producing and distributing remarkable stories about the lives of birds.

DPR Programming Notes
8:53 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Earth and Sky becomes BirdNote

Birdnote.org
Credit birdnote.org

As of last week, Earth and Sky has ceased production. We are sorry to see this program go, but happy to introduce you to Bird Note. Bird Note is a daily two-minute program all about birds and their environment. You can hear Bird Note right before All Things Considered @3:56 every weekday afternoon.

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Podcasts

  • Wednesday, March 4, 2015 3:00am
    In a clearing where an ancient Mayan city once stood, the Montezuma Oropendola perches and sings. His courtship display is astonishing: he swings by his feet and sings, his tail describing a golden pendulum - the very source of his name in Spanish - oropendola.
  • Tuesday, March 3, 2015 3:00am
    Some birds are born with the ability to sing. Others learn to sing while they're young — just like humans, who must learn to speak. It turns out that vocal learning in songbirds and humans may have more in common than anyone suspected.
  • Monday, March 2, 2015 3:00am
    Many scientists believe that the demise of the dinosaurs began when an asteroid struck the earth 66 million years ago. Some dinosaurs survived, and among them were the early ancestors of birds. Recently an international research team sequenced the genomes of 45 birds of diverse lineages.
  • Sunday, March 1, 2015 3:00am
    The small, nondescript Pied-billed Grebe has an astonishing talent. The grebe is the master of its own buoyancy. It can squeeze out both the air trapped in its feathers and in its internal air-sacs and sink effortlessly.
  • Saturday, February 28, 2015 3:00am
    Tall and prehistoric-looking, the Great Blue Heron is the largest heron in North America. Great Blue Herons are often seen flying high overhead with slow wing-beats. When foraging, they stand silently along riverbanks, on lake shores, or in wet meadows. Quickly then, they stab at their prey.