Bird Note

3:57, right before ATC

BirdNote educates and inspires people to care about the future of the natural world.  We do this by producing and distributing remarkable stories about the lives of birds.

DPR Programming Notes
8:53 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Earth and Sky becomes BirdNote

Birdnote.org
Credit birdnote.org

As of last week, Earth and Sky has ceased production. We are sorry to see this program go, but happy to introduce you to Bird Note. Bird Note is a daily two-minute program all about birds and their environment. You can hear Bird Note right before All Things Considered @3:56 every weekday afternoon.

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Podcasts

  • Friday, February 27, 2015 3:00am
    Ravens are seen as tricksters in many traditions. But Common Ravens have a softer side. During courtship, a pair will often sit side by side, sometimes preening each other's feathers. And during that ritual, one or both may make soft warbling sounds.
  • Thursday, February 26, 2015 3:00am
    In winter, a foraging flock might include several species of birds: chickadees, kinglets, and even a Downy Woodpecker. Many bird species eat alone, so you might wonder why these birds have chosen to dine together. Different species flocking together to find food enhances the success of all.
  • Wednesday, February 25, 2015 3:00am
    In February, winter still holds sway over much of North America. But in Argentina, it’s summer, and birds are in full voice. Argentina’s national bird, the Rufous Hornero, belts out a rapid trill while the Rufous-bellied Thrush sings its lovely song.
  • Tuesday, February 24, 2015 3:00am
    Wood Storks nest in trees, often in big colonies, and only when conditions are just right for them. Because of their feeding technique, they thrive in the early part of the dry season, when receding floodwaters concentrate fish in small pools.
  • Monday, February 23, 2015 3:00am
    Look for the stories birds tell with their tracks in the snow. A crow swaggers, leaving right-and-left steps much as a walking human would. Juncos under a birdfeeder leave a hopping pattern of tiny footprints in side-by-side pairs.