All Things Considered

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Code Switch
7:01 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Language Barriers Pose Challenges For Mayan Migrant Children

Hugo Pascual Tomas Manuel, 15, attends English classes at the Guatemalan-Maya Center in Lake Worth, Fla. He grew up speaking Q'anjob'al, or Kanjobal, an indigenous Mayan language.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 7:43 pm

Among the tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors who have come from Central America this year are children who speak little or no Spanish. Many are from Guatemala's indigenous communities, who speak more than 20 different Mayan languages.

Rafael Domingo, 16, grew up in Guatemala speaking Q'anjob'al, sometimes referred to as Kanjobal. The youngest son of a single mother, he rode a bus, walked for miles and crossed a river before he was stopped at the Texas border.

"It was so difficult to come to this country," Domingo says through an interpreter.

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Code Switch
6:23 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Honolulu Police Chief's Ban On Visible Tattoos Sparks Criticism

Keone Nunes, a Native Hawaiian tattoo artist, says prayers to "awaken" the tattoo tools and bless the ink. Two "stretchers" pull the skin tight on the chest of Kaiola Farin to enable Nunes to tap straight lines.
Wayne Yoshioka Hawaii Public Radio

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 7:37 pm

The Honolulu Police Department motto is "integrity, respect and fairness." But many of the Hawaiian natives on the force say the new rule banning visible tattoos isn't fair and doesn't respect their religious customs.

Keone Nunes is a practitioner who taps out tattoo designs just as they were done a thousand years ago. He uses a hand-held tool — a kind of miniature rake with needle-sharp tines made of animal tusks dipped in black ink. Uhi, or the artwork, is secondary to the prayers, protocols and techniques used in the ancient Native Hawaiian practice, he says.

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Code Switch
6:22 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Influx Of Children Creates New Strain On Beleaguered Immigration Courts

Boys in a holding area at a Border Protection center in Nogales, Ariz. Generally, minors are put into deportation proceedings and given a "Notice To Appear" in immigration court, but they have permission to stay in the country while the U.S. decides their fate.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 10:55 pm

President Obama said over the weekend that he is seeking to fast-track deportations of unaccompanied immigrant children from Central America who cross into the United States.

More than 52,000 have been caught in South Texas since October, and hundreds more arrive daily, overwhelming Border Patrol stations and overflowing temporary shelters.

But once they get here, what happens? Do they just get to stay, as the president's critics charge?

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The Salt
5:40 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Breeding Battle Threatens Key Source Of California Strawberries

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 11:48 pm

In California, a legal skirmish has erupted over strawberries — or rather, over strawberry breeding.

To be absolutely precise, the battle is about strawberry breeding at the University of California, Davis. This is more important than it might sound. More than half of all strawberries in the supermarket trace their ancestry to breeding plots at UC Davis.

The strawberry breeders at UC Davis, who've led that program for decades, are leaving the university to carry on their work at a new private company.

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Iraq
4:30 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

While Militants Gain Ground, Iraqis Search Out Hope In Future

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 7:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Hanaa Edwar is a longtime activist for human rights - in particular, women's rights and democracy in Iraq. She runs a nonprofit called Al-Amal, which means hope in Arabic. And she joins me now from Baghdad to offer her perspective on the future of her country. Miss Edwar, welcome to the program.

HANAA EDWAR: Thank you very much.

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Latin America
4:27 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Argentinian World Cup Fans Plant Their Flag In Brazil

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 2:03 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And now some World Cup news that is not about the U.S. team. Argentina played Switzerland today. The South American country won, scoring a goal in overtime. Argentina's fans were out in force in Sao Paulo, where the two teams faced off. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro says supporters of Brazil's greatest rival are getting a lot of attention in the host country.

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Remembrances
4:25 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Remembering Paul Mazursky, A Filmmaker With An Ear For His Era

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 7:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Filmmaker Paul Mazursky has died. The writer and director captured the spirit of his times in such comedies as "Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice" and "An Unmarried Woman." Mazursky died yesterday in Los Angeles at the age of 84. And joining us now to talk about him is our film critic, Bob Mondello. Hi, Bob.

BOB MONDELLO, BYLINE: Hi.

SIEGEL: Mazursky had a very extensive career. Tell us about it.

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News
6:20 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

BNP Paribas Agrees To Nearly $9 Billion Fine And Admission Of Guilt

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:30 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Banking giant BNP Paribas has agreed to pay American regulators nearly $9 billion dollars to settle charges of economic sanctions violations. It's the largest such fine ever imposed by the U.S. The bank will plead guilty to two criminal charges. It was accused of helping clients in Sudan, Cuba and Iran conduct business in the United States. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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Technology
5:54 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Why 140 Characters, When One Will Do? Tracing The Emoji Evolution

NPR

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:01 pm

You may have heard that 250 more emojis, the little smiley face icons and other symbols you can send in text messages, are coming to a cellphone near you.

The story of the emoji starts in Japan in the mid-1990s. Back then, pagers were all the rage with teenagers.

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All Tech Considered
5:16 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

An Algorithm Is A Curator At The Sept. 11 Museum

"Timescape" finds words in the news associated with Sept. 11, and weights them according to prominence in a story — not just how often they appear.
Gaurav Bradoo

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 4:34 pm

Sept. 11, 2001, means many things — and conflicting things — to each of us. Charged emotions, and debates over a history that's still so recent, made it really hard to design the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in Lower Manhattan. It was so difficult, in fact, that museum curators decided to try something quite new. They decided to hand off major curatorial duties to a computer algorithm.

Analytic Stop In An Emotional Journey

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Politics
5:03 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Obama Vows To Flex Executive Authority On Immigration Policy

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:01 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR news, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. President Obama came out to the White House Rose Garden today to plead, once again, for Congress to act on the bipartisan immigration bill the Senate passed a year ago. Since then, it's been stalled in the House.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Middle East
4:42 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Between Israel And Hamas, 3 Killed Teens Escalate Tensions

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 11:26 pm

Three Israeli teens who have been missing since June 12 — including one who is a dual U.S.-Israeli citizen — were found killed in the West Bank. Israel blames Hamas and is expected to take action against the militant group. Daniel Estrin talks to Melissa Block from Jerusalem.

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Law
4:38 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

High Court Allows Some Companies To Opt Out Of Contraceptives Mandate

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:07 pm

For the first time, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that a for-profit corporation can refuse to comply with a general government mandate because doing so would violate the corporation's asserted religious beliefs.

By a 5-4 vote, the court struck an important part of President Obama's health care law — the requirement that all insurance plans cover birth control — because it conflicted with a corporation owners' religious beliefs.

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NPR Ed
4:29 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

A Role Model Pipeline For Young Black Men

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:20 pm

This story is part of the "Men in America" series on All Things Considered.

Fewer than 2 percent of the nation's elementary school teachers are black men. A program at Clemson University in South Carolina is looking to change that.

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Business
6:45 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

For Tipped Workers, A Different Minimum Wage Battle

States may have their own higher wage laws, but the federal minimum wage for tipped workers is $2.13 an hour.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:14 am

The federal minimum wage for tipped workers has been $2.13 since 1991. That pay rate tends to get lost in the larger debate over whether to raise the national minimum wage for nontipped workers, which is $7.25 an hour.

In theory, the money from tips should make up the difference in pay — and then some. But according to a White House report, tipped workers are more than twice as likely as other workers to experience poverty.

Living On Tips

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Movie Interviews
6:11 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

Behind Optimus Prime (And Eeyore), One Man's Signature Voice

Voice actor Peter Cullen arrives at the premiere of Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen in June 2009.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:20 am

Transformers: Age of Extinction has smashed its way to the No. 1 spot at the box office. Director Michael Bay's film franchise has consistently topped charts since the first film arrived in theaters in 2007.

The live-action films have embraced the latest in visual affects — but the movies have also called back to the series' past, through the voice of Peter Cullen.

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Sports
5:05 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

Colombia Advances In World Cup, Two Decades After Infamous Murder

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 6:27 pm

The Colombian national team has reached the World Cup quarterfinals for the first time ever. It comes on the anniversary of the infamous murder of star Colombian player Andres Escobar, just weeks after he scored an own goal in the Cup. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with John Rojas, a Colombian-American journalist whose new Spanish-language book Futbol de negro is a fictionalized account of those weeks.

U.S.
5:05 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

Employees' Pay Cut By Denied Overtime, Deductions For Equipment

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 6:11 pm

Thousands of Americans each year lose portions of their wages to wage theft. NPR's Arun Rath talks with Tia Koonse, of the UCLA Labor Center, about efforts to curtail the problem.

U.S.
5:05 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

Hard-To-Change Mistakes Led To Successful 'No-Fly List' Case

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 6:11 pm

This week, a federal judge ruled that the government's no-fly list process is unconstitutional. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Abe Mashal, one of the 13 plaintiffs in the case.

Code Switch
6:22 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

'Everything I Never Told You' Exposed In Biracial Family's Loss

Everything I Never Told You is Celeste Ng's debut novel about a Chinese-American family living in 1970s Ohio. She is currently working on a second novel and a collection of short stories.
Kevin Day The Penguin Press

It's May, 1977, in small-town Ohio, and the Lee family is sitting down at breakfast. James is Chinese-American and Marilyn is white, and they have three children — two girls and a boy. But on this day, their middle child Lydia, who is also their favorite, is nowhere to be found.

That's how Celeste Ng's new novel, Everything I Never Told You, begins.

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Business
5:21 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

Australia Joins Flood Of Global Investment In Silicon Valley

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 6:22 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

If you're just joining us, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. Silicon Valley's dynamic and flush economy is attracting investors from all over the world. The Chinese e-commerce giant, Alibaba, has already invested millions into the ride-sharing company Lyft. Russian investors have large stakes in companies like Facebook and Twitter.

Now Australia is getting in on the action. Carlos Watson is the co-founder of the online magazine, Ozy. And he joins us now. Carlos, what kind of investments are we talking about here?

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Iraq
5:21 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

ISIS Controls Northern Cities, But Local Forces Run Them

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 6:22 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

In cities now under the control of ISIS militants, Iraqi civilians are stuck in the middle of a violent confrontation between the government and insurgents. Ghaith Abdul-Ahad is Middle East correspondent for The Guardian. And he's been traveling north of Baghdad. He says even though ISIS has military control of Northern Iraqi cities, local Sunni groups are actually running day-to-day life there.

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All Tech Considered
5:21 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

Modern Video Games Go Beyond 'Jumping On Blocks'

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 12:35 pm

The video game BioShock Infinite received widespread praise for having a rich narrative packed with philosophy when it debuted last year. The game sold millions of copies.

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Iraq
5:21 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

Baghdad Sits In Limbo As Government Forces Push Back On ISIS

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 6:22 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

The phrase Civil War is starting to pop up more and more when it comes to Iraq. Large swaths of the country are held by militants led by the extremist group the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria - or ISIS. Today government forces began an offensive to retake the northern cities of Mosul and Tikrit.

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Technology
5:21 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

Harley Hopes An Electric Hog Will Appeal To Young, Urban Riders

Harley-Davidson riders reveal Project LiveWire, the first electric Harley-Davidson motorcycle, during a ride across New York City's Manhattan Bridge on June 23.
Neilson Barnard Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 6:22 pm

Many motorcycle riders covet the distinctive growl of a Harley-Davidson — and sometimes even add extra-loud exhaust pipes to amp up the sound.

But the motorcycle maker has now rolled out a prototype bike that makes more of a whisper than a rumble. It's a sporty-looking model called LiveWire, and it's powered by batteries.

Harley-Davidson plans to take its prototype electric motorcycle to more than 30 cities over the next few months. Sometime after that, the company will decide whether to put LiveWire on the market.

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This Week's Must Read
6:12 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

SCOTUS On Cellphones And The Privacy Of Poetry

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 6:33 pm

Dear sweet privacy, where did you go? And where can we go to be alone with you again? Thanks to the Supreme Court, one answer is, surprisingly, our cell phones. On Wednesday, the Court ruled that, except in emergencies such as kidnappings and bomb threats, police can't search our phones without a warrant.

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The Salt
5:39 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Got Leftovers To Share? In Germany, There's A Website For That

Europeans throw away 90 million tons of food each year, including these vegetables pulled from waste bins of an organic supermarket in Berlin. A new German website aims to connect surplus food with people who want it.
Fabrizio Bensch Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 10:46 am

Child psychiatrist Vero Buschmann says she was looking for a way to get rid of leftovers without having to throw them away. At the same time, the Berlin resident wanted to meet new people.

She found a nonprofit website in Germany that allows her to do both. On a recent evening, her doorbell rings and she buzzes Franzi Zimmerman in to her fifth-floor apartment.

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The Two-Way
5:39 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

In Iraq, Coordination With Iran Not Impossible, Gen. Dempsey Says

Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey speaks during a news conference at the Pentagon in December.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 6:33 pm

In an interview with All Things Considered, Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, declined to rule out coordination with Iran and Iranian-backed forces in Iraq. Dempsey also told NPR that one option in Iraq might involve U.S. air assets going after "high-value" individuals within the main Sunni insurgent group.

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Religion
4:57 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Podcaster Risks Excommunication For Defending Gay Mormons

Spires from the Mormon temple in downtown Salt Lake City reach to the sky.
George Frey AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 6:33 pm

Leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are cracking down on members who openly dispute the doctrine of the faith. Earlier this week, a Mormon feminist was excommunicated for pursing membership in the all-male priesthood of the church. Now another member, John Dehlin, is facing the same fate — for questioning scripture and speaking out on behalf of gay Mormons.

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The Salt
4:57 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Lone Passenger Pigeon Escapes Pie Pan, Lands In Smithsonian

A male passenger pigeon, illustrated in a book of natural history printed in 1754.
Courtesy of Biodiversity Heritage Library

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 6:33 pm

"Pigeon: It's what's for dinner."

That might sound strange to us, but it could have been uttered by our great-grandparents. Baked into pot pies, stewed, fried or salted, the passenger pigeon was a staple for many North Americans.

But by 1914, only one was left: Martha.

Named after Martha Washington, she lived a long life at the Cincinnati Zoo until 1914. The bird, now on exhibit at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, was a celebrity.

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