All Things Considered

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Music Interviews
7:00 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

Jessie Baylin: Searching For A Certain 'Spark'

Jessie Baylin says she wanted her new album, Little Spark, "to be nostalgic but still fresh and modern."
Mike Hallock

Originally published on Sat January 21, 2012 6:42 pm

The album Little Spark evokes a sound you might have heard 40 years ago, piercing through the static of your AM radio. The big string sections and angelic choruses are all there, echoing the hallmarks of classic orchestral pop. But Little Spark is the work of a modern singer-songwriter named Jessie Baylin.

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Books
4:18 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

Talk Nerdy To Me: Three Reads For Your Inner Geek

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri January 20, 2012 7:08 pm

If you're seriously into reading, chances are, if you're not a nerd, then you've at least got some nerdy DNA somewhere in your intellectual genome. I know I do. But as a reader I sometimes feel like I'm being asked to identify with a hero who isn't nearly geeky enough — a hero with uncorrected vision and excellent orthodontics and really good hair. Sure, he's nice, but I doubt I would have wanted to sit at his table in the cafeteria in high school.

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Election 2012
3:22 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

For South Carolina Voters, Jobs May Matter Most

Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign stop at Seven Oaks Park this week in Irmol, S.C. Jobs are likely to be an important issue for South Carolina voters in Saturday's primary, with the state's unemployment rate at 9.9 percent.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 20, 2012 7:08 pm

In a presidential election that most expect will be all about the economy, South Carolina is a state where economic issues are front and center. The state's unemployment rate is 9.9 percent, well above the national rate. But even that number is deceptive. There are pockets around the state where the conditions are much more severe. In Lancaster County, for example, the rate is above 12 percent.

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Movie Reviews
12:01 am
Fri January 20, 2012

Carol Channing, Still Delightfully 'Larger Than Life'

Carol Channing — who turns 91 on Jan. 31 — appears in the 2010 Gypsy of the Year celebration, an annual salute to Broadway's hardest-working chorus performers.
Peter James Zielinski Entertainment One

Whenever the late New York Times caricaturist Al Hirschfeld sketched Carol Channing — whether picturing her as an indomitable Dolly Levi, swathed in feathers and sequins, or as carbon-crazed Lorelei Lee, eyes sparkling like the diamonds that were that splendid creature's best friends — he always made her appear a creature composed entirely of lipstick, mascara and hairspray.

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Opinion
6:26 pm
Thu January 19, 2012

For Two City Slickers, Survival Of The Savviest

A wagon makes its way across the country.
istockphoto.com

Rhoda Janzen is the author of Mennonite in a Little Black Dress.

Recently my friend Peggy and I decided to make a jaunt from my house in Southwestern Michigan, across the state to Detroit. We took her car. At day's end we pulled into my remote driveway on Lake Allegan. It was then I realized that didn't have my keys. They were in fact, hanging in the little key box in my laundry room.

Oh no.

I had no way of getting into my home.

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Monkey See
4:00 pm
Thu January 19, 2012

Fox International Finds That Not Everyone Wants To Buy What Hollywood Sells

Stephanie Sigman as Laura, a beauty queen drawn into a Mexican drug gang, in the film Miss Bala.
Eniac Martinez Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

Originally published on Thu January 19, 2012 10:16 pm

Remember that movie Sarah's Key? Did you miss it? It was last year's highest grossing foreign-language film, but it made less than eight million dollars. The fact is that selling foreign language films to U.S. audiences is a notorious challenge. Nevertheless, Fox, one of the world's most powerful media conglomerates, is beefing up its investment in foreign films.

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The Record
3:32 pm
Thu January 19, 2012

Johnny Otis, Rhythm And Blues Pioneer, Has Died

Johnny Otis was many things over his career, including a bandleader, producer, radio and TV host and composer. Additionally, Otis launched the careers of many of R&B's finest singers. Otis died on Tuesday at his home near Los Angeles. He was 90 years old.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu January 19, 2012

Apple Carves Inroads In Educational Publishing

Apple announced it is getting into the electronic textbook business. The tech company is releasing new tools that make it easier for publishers to create new, interactive textbooks designed to be used on Apple's iPad.

Music Interviews
12:08 pm
Thu January 19, 2012

Kathleen Edwards: A Breakup Song's Bigger Picture

Kathleen Edwards' new album is Voyageur.
Tanja-Tiziana Burd

Kathleen Edwards is a singer-songwriter from Canada who just released her fourth album, Voyageur. There's a lot of heartache and self-doubt on the record, and that makes sense — much of it was written around the time of Edwards' divorce from her husband and musical collaborator. The song "Pink Champagne" would seem to be a case in point: It takes place at a wedding where a young bride is second-guessing her decision. But Edwards says the message of that song isn't quite so literal.

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House & Senate Races
5:30 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Two Democratic Allies Battle For One House Seat

Reps. Dennis Kucinich and Marcy Kaptur on Sept 20, 2011, in Solon, Ohio. The state's new congressional district map has the two veteran Democrats now competing for the same congressional seat.
Amy Sancetta AP

Originally published on Tue March 6, 2012 6:15 pm

Rep. Dennis Kucinich is most in his element when he's fighting against social injustice.

Wherever he sees an outrage against the little guy, you'll find the Ohio Democrat railing against it — like at a recent public meeting about a new trash-to-energy facility Cleveland wants to install in a west side neighborhood.

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The Two-Way
3:50 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Was One Skier's Underwear Too Slick?

Skier Tina Maze. She took her protest to the slopes in Italy, and to her Facebook page.
Tina Maze Official Fan Page

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 7:27 pm

When Slovene World Cup Alpine skier Tina Maze opened her racing suit Sunday to reveal her sports bra beneath to all those looking on in Cortina D'Ampezzo, Italy, it wasn't some kind of sexy strip show or joyous Brandi Chastain type of moment.

It was a protest.

Over a fuss being made about her underwear.

Not the bra, mind you, or the words she had written on it: "Not your business."

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Gettleman Discusses Violence In South Sudan

Audie Cornish speaks with Jeffrey Gettleman, East Africa bureau chief for the New York Times, about escalating violence in South Sudan.

Law
3:00 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

High Court Rules In Favor Of Death Row Inmate

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 8:00 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court has given an Alabama death row inmate another chance to fight his execution. By a 7-to-2 vote, the court ruled Wednesday that convicted murderer Cory Maples, "through no fault of his own," was denied the right to appeal because he was abandoned by his lawyers.

Maples was convicted in 1997 of murdering two friends and was sentenced to death. There is no doubt that he committed the crime; the doubt is whether he could have avoided the death penalty if he had been properly represented at trial.

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Energy
3:00 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Keystone Proposal Rejected On Technicality

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 7:27 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Opinion
8:58 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Hot To Trot: Dating With A Few More Wrinkles

Adult children are often surprised when their their over-60 parents hit the dating scene.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 9:00 am

Brian Unger is the host of the History Channel show How The States Got Their Shapes.

When we talk about our moms, many of us end up crying. Barbra Walters made her career exploiting this universal weakness. Newt Gingrich proved it recently, very publicly, in Iowa talking about his mom.

I'm going to try to control my emotions as I discuss my mom.

Because I'm not ashamed to say — lately, there have been a few tears.

My mom's not sick. No, she beat cancer.

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Country/Americana
2:29 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

The Little Willies: For The Wrenching 'Good Times'

The Little Willies' For the Good Times brings together five accomplished musicians of varying musical backgrounds.
Courtesy of the artist

It's been six years since The Little Willies released an eponymous debut album.

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Three Books...
3:39 pm
Mon January 16, 2012

Rebel Memoirs: Three Confessions From The Edge

istockphoto.com

These days, memoirs are often the target of contempt. A scathing slam in New York Times Book Review this year inveighed against "oversharing"; and in the New Yorker, the memoirist was likened to "a drunken guest at a wedding... motivated by an overpowering need to be the center of attention." If the narrative deals with socially unacceptable matters like abuse, addiction, family dysfunction, or even poverty, the scorn gets even thicker.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:53 pm
Mon January 16, 2012

Violinist Joshua Bell: 'French Impressions,' Yesterday And Today

Joshua Bell revisits the classic Violin Sonata by Cesar Franck on his new album.
Lisa Marie Mazzucco

When Joshua Bell was 21, he recorded an iconic piece of chamber music for piano and violin — the Sonata in A major by Cesar Franck. Today, Bell is 44 and he's recorded it again. It's on his new album, French Impressions, with pianist Jeremy Denk.

All Things Considered host Robert Siegel invited Bell to listen to his old recording for a little session of compare-and-contrast.

"Do you hear the same violinist?" Siegel asks, after playing for Bell the opening bars of his 1989 recording.

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Around the Nation
3:34 pm
Sun January 15, 2012

Corner Perk Cafe's Customers Pay It Forward

The Corner Perk Cafe in Bluffton, South Carolina.
Mandi Brower Photography

At first glance, the Corner Perk Cafe in Bluffton, South Carolina seems like a regular neighborhood cafe, but in 2010, a customer's spontaneous act set it apart.

Thirty-year-old Josh Cooke, the owner of the Corner Perk describes when a woman came in one day and left a large bill.

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Monkey See
2:10 pm
Sun January 15, 2012

The Art Of The Modern Movie Trailer

Silent Screen idol George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) and Peppy Miller (Berenice Bejo), a young and upcoming dancer, share a vivacious moment on stage in Michel Hazanavicius's film The Artist.
The Weinstein Company

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 9:45 am

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Movie Interviews
11:21 am
Sun January 15, 2012

Ryan Tedder: A Hit-Maker With A Golden Touch

Ryan Tedder performs with OneRepublic in 2011.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 15, 2012 6:45 pm

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Author Interviews
4:49 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

Alan Bennett Defies Expectations With 'Smut'

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 7:14 pm

Alan Bennett, author of The History Boys and The Madness of King George, among countless other books, plays and memoirs, is a grand old man of British letters.

"I'm getting on now, and I'm thought of in England as being rather cozy and genteel — certainly in the stories that I write," he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

So Bennett decided to give his readers a little rattle with a new book of two short stories called Smut.

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Author Interviews
3:13 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

The Inquisition: Alive And Well After 800 Years

When we talk of inquisition it is usually prefaced with a definite article — as in, The Inquisition. But, as Vanity Fair editor Cullen Murphy points out in his new book, God's Jury, the Inquisition wasn't a single event but rather a decentralized, centuries-long process.

Murphy says the "inquisitorial impulse" is alive and well today — despite its humble origins with the Cathars in France, where it was initially designed to deal with Christian heretics.

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Analysis
3:00 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

Week In News: Corporate Money And The Campaigns

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 7:14 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

(SOUNDBITE OF POLITICAL AD)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: A story of greed, playing the system for a quick buck, a group of corporate raiders led by Mitt Romney, more ruthless than Wall Street.

RAZ: That's part of an anti-Mitt Romney ad now running in South Carolina. The video is being distributed by pro-Newt Gingrich superPAC. And its message may be a sign of a growing philosophical split among the GOP candidates.

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Business
3:00 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

Breaking Down Bain Capital

Private equity firms are under the microscope this week as a pro-Gingrich superPAC hounds GOP candidate Mitt Romney for his role as head of Bain Capital. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz talks with Dan Primack, senior editor of Fortune Magazine, about how these firms operate and the legitimacy of these attacks.

Election 2012
3:00 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

Santorum Gets Backing From Social Conservatives

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 7:14 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Now, as the Romney campaign has been building momentum, religious conservatives remain deeply uncomfortable with him as the prospective Republican nominee. Today in Texas, evangelical leaders met. And as NPR's Joel Rose reports, they threw their support behind former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum.

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NPR Story
5:08 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

A Look At Romney's Olympic Legacy

At the opening ceremony of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Mitt Romney (left) stands with President George W. Bush (center) and International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge (right) in front of the American flag that flew at the World Trade Center before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
George Frey AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:07 am

Ten years after the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics, there's still some debate about Mitt Romney's claim that he helped "save" the games — and about whether he used the Olympics to relaunch a fledgling political career.

In 1999, Romney accepted the job as CEO of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee (SLOC), five years after he failed to oust Sen. Ted Kennedy from his Massachusetts Senate seat.

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Music Interviews
4:14 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

R.E.M.'s Dark And Brooding 'Sweetness'

"It's always hard to tell exactly what [R.E.M.'s] Michael Stipe is singing about," says NPR listener and novelist Thomas Mullen.
Sean Gardner Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 3:23 pm

All this winter, All Things Considered has been asking for winter songs — and the stories they evoke.

One tough winter in Rhode Island, NPR listener and novelist Thomas Mullen experienced financial ruin with his family. The song that got him through it was R.E.M.'s "Sweetness Follows."

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

Top Skier In New Olympic Sport Injured

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 5:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

One of the top athletes in the new Olympic sport of ski halfpipe is in critical condition in a Utah hospital. Twenty-nine-year-old Canadian Sarah Burke was injured when she fell during a training run in Park City earlier this week.

Burke is considered a pioneer in a sport where competitors on skis do the same tricks and flips that snowboarders do, all in a super-sized halfpipe. NPR's Tom Goldman reports.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

In China, Apple Halts Sales Of New iPhone

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 5:08 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Apple has halted store sales of its iPhone 4S in China after fights erupted outside its flagship outlet in Beijing.

As NPR's Frank Langfitt reports, scalpers and angry would-be customers marked the phone's Chinese launch.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: At the Apple store in Beijing's Sanlitun shopping district, scalpers scuffled overnight causing the store to keep its door shut. Some in the crowd responded by hurling eggs at the windows.

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