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Law
8:28 pm
Wed April 25, 2012

Immigration Brings High Drama To The High Court

This artist rendering shows Solicitor General Donald Verrilli speaking before the Supreme Court. Verrilli argued Wednesday that Arizona's immigration law steps into federal territory.
Dana Verkouteren AP

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 8:53 am

A majority of U.S. Supreme Court justices signaled Wednesday that they will uphold at least part of Arizona's controversial immigration law. Four provisions of the law were blocked by a federal appeals court last year, and while even some of the court's conservatives expressed skepticism about some of those provisions, a majority seemed willing to unblock the so-called "show me your papers" provisions.

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Music Reviews
4:24 pm
Wed April 25, 2012

The Sound Man Behind The Soul Of The Nation's Capital

Eccentric Soul: A Red Black Green Production (the cover detail of the album is above) revisits the influence of producer Robert Williams on the 1970s soul scene in Washington, D.C.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 10:07 pm

Most people wouldn't think of Washington, D.C., as one of R&B's great cities. Despite the fact that soul music greats Marvin Gaye and Roberta Flack grew up in D.C. neighborhoods, the city never had the equivalent of Detroit's Berry Gordy and Motown, or Memphis' Willie Mitchell and Hi Records. But in the early 1970s, D.C. did have producer Robert Williams and his Red, Black and Green Productions. A new compilation album called Eccentric Soul: A Red Black Green Production revisits Williams' influence on the sound of R&B in D.C.

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Space
5:37 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

Tech Entrepreneurs Bet Big On Asteroid Mining

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Today, a group of entrepreneurs unveiled a new company that aims to mine precious metals and other resources from asteroids. The idea of exploiting the natural resources on asteroids has been around for more than a century, and this is not the first company to lay out such grand plans.

But as NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce reports, this one does have the financial backing of some big names in high tech.

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

First Criminal Charges Filed In BP Gulf Oil Spill

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:37 pm

The first criminal charges were filed on Tuesday in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster. An engineer for BP was charged with obstruction of justice for deleting hundreds of text messages after the spill. Carrie Johnson talks to Robert Siegel.

NPR Story
4:05 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

James Murdoch Grilled On News Corp.'s Standards

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Rupert Murdoch's son James testified today before a public inquiry in Britain. There, he faced a fundamental question: Did his family use its media influence to bully British politicians into making decisions that advanced the Murdoch's corporate interests? NPR's Philip Reeves followed the hearing in London.

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Politics
5:11 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

When Politicians Slip, Video Trackers Are There

In politics, video tracking has become normal. And it's a growth industry. There are trackers working for campaigns, political parties and, increasingly, political action committees.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 8:25 pm

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Around the Nation
5:04 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

President Obama Takes Steps To End Mass Atrocities

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

President Obama toured the U.S. Holocaust Museum in Washington today joined by Holocaust survivor, author and Nobel Laureate, Elie Wiesel. Mr. Obama said the U.S. must never again allow such atrocities to take place.

As NPR's Don Gonyea reports, the president also announced new tools to punish countries that use technology to track and target their citizens.

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The Record
4:41 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Remembering Bert Weedon, Guitar Teacher To Rock Stars (And Many More)

British guitarist Bert Weedon died Friday at age 91.
Keystone Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:39 pm

Even if you've never heard the name Bert Weedon before, his death on Friday, at the age of 91, deserves a salute: a chiming, perfectly fingered D major chord salute.

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NPR Story
4:41 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Murdochs, News Corp Face Big Week Of Investigations

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 7:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

In Britain, the allegations keep coming of illegal behavior by Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation. Today, an investigation was announced into email hacking by Sky News. News Corp's British operations already stand accused of phone hacking, along with bribing police officers.

As NPR's David Folkenflik reports, the new investigation comes just before Murdoch is scheduled to testify on the sandal.

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Books
5:30 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

She closed the book, placed it on the table and finally decided to walk through the door. That's the starting sentence for Round 8 of Three-Minute Fiction. That's our contest where we ask you to write an original short story that can be read in about three minutes. Our readers from across the country are combing through all of our 6,000 submissions this round. Let's hear a sample of their favorites so far.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Around the Nation
5:30 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Women Take Over The Farm

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Staying in the middle of the country, you might have heard that America's farmers are getting older. Something else you probably know: women tend to outlive men. So do the math and what do you get? More women in charge of land and some who aren't really sure how to take care of it. So as Iowa Public Radio's Sarah McCammon reports, female conservationists are reaching out to this growing group.

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Interviews
5:03 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

Comparing Trayvon Martin, O.J. Simpson Cases

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

On Friday, TV audiences got their first taste of the media frenzy that could come with a televised Trayvon Martin trial when a Florida judge granted bail to George Zimmerman. That decision, whether to televise or not, has yet to be made.

Writer John McWhorter thinks it would be a very good thing. And in the latest issue of The New Republic, he argues that it could become a bookend to another famous and racially charged trial: the O.J. Simpson case.

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Europe
5:02 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

France's Sarkozy Faces Election Runoff

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

President Nicolas Sarkozy and socialist rival Francois Hollande were the top vote-getters in the first round of the French presidential election today. They'll head to a runoff on May 6. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley in Paris sent us this report.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERS)

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Author Interviews
2:21 pm
Sun April 22, 2012

India: A Country In The Midst Of Change

Riverhead Books

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

Akash Kapur is the son of an Indian father and an American mother. In 2003, after working professionally in New York City for more than a decade, he decided to return to India. As he writes in his book, India Becoming: A Portrait of Life in Modern India, he arrived in a place he hardly recognized.

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Music Lists
7:21 pm
Sat April 21, 2012

What's Hot On The Billboard Latin Charts

Brazilian superstar Michel Teló is burning up Billboard's Latin Songs chart with "Ai Se Eu Te Pego."
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

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Pop Culture
5:00 pm
Sat April 21, 2012

Pop Culture's 40-Year Itch

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz. And we're going to talk about music, movies and culture now, and in particular, about something known as the 40-year rule. Adam Gopnik is with us now from New York. He's written about it for the latest issue of The New Yorker. Hello, Adam.

ADAM GOPNIK: Hey, Guy. How are you?

RAZ: I'm good. Let's explain this with a pop quiz, Adam. You know the answers. so don't give it away because this is for the listeners.

GOPNIK: All right.

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Around the Nation
4:12 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Shooter Apologizes To Trayvon Martin's Family

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 6:06 pm

It was supposed to be a routine and quick bond hearing for George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who killed teenager Trayvon Martin. Friday's court hearing was anything but routine; Zimmerman took the stand and apologized to Martin's parents.

Deceptive Cadence
3:21 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

To Russia, With Musical Love — After 22 Years' Absence

An advertisement in Moscow for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's first concerts in Russia in more than two decades.
Todd Rosenberg Courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 6:06 pm

This week, music is bringing Americans and Russians together in a way that policy discussions never can. And don't call that a cliche in front of the music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

If U.S. relations with Russia have hit a sticky patch over Syria and other issues lately, that didn't stop the Chicago Symphony from thrilling a Russian audience this past Wednesday night, just as it did on its last visit — to the then-Soviet Union in 1990.

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Politics
3:21 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Bill Could Complicate U.S.-Russia Relations

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 6:06 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

Bipartisanship is rare on Capitol Hill these days but one bill is gaining support from both Republicans and Democrats. There's a problem, though, the Obama administration is leery of it.

As NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, the bill involves human rights abuses in Russia. And U.S. diplomats are worried it could complicate relations at a time when the U.S. needs Russia's backing on a range of issues.

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Sports
3:21 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Rockies' Pitcher Jamie Moyer Sets Age Record

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 6:06 pm

Tuesday night, Colorado Rockies pitcher Jamie Moyer became the oldest pitcher to win a Major League Baseball game at the age of 49. He pitched the Rockies to a win of 5-to-3 over the San Diego Padres. Melissa Block talks to Moyer about the game and his career.

Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu April 19, 2012

'Think Like A Man,' And We'll See What Happens

Mya (Meagan Good), while dating Zeke (Romany Malco), follows the do's and don't's of dating advice from comedian Steve Harvey's real-world self-help book Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man.
Alan Markfield Sony Pictures

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 6:06 pm

Oy, the things daters have to worry about these days. Not just how to dress, act and turn "no" into "go," but how not to become a chirp-chirp girl.

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Planet Money
3:53 pm
Thu April 19, 2012

Should We Kill The Dollar Bill?

Robert Benincasa NPR

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 4:53 pm

Our story begins last month inside a busy Washington, D.C. subway station plastered with posters of giant dollar bills. One of them says: "Tell Congress to stop wasting time trying to eliminate the dollar bill." Another asks: "Do you heart the dollar?"

Political fights in the nation's capital normally involve billions or even trillions, not single dollars. What's going on here?

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The Record
3:36 pm
Thu April 19, 2012

Levon Helm, Drummer And Singer In The Band, Dies

Levon Helm performing with The Band in 1971.
Jan Persson Redferns

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 8:33 am

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Three Books...
6:00 pm
Wed April 18, 2012

Jargon To Jabberwocky: 3 Books To Jazz Your Writing

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu April 19, 2012 8:49 am

I'm an English professor, and I spent the first 15 years of my career trying to write like one. You might be surprised by what that's like. We don't emulate the fiction writers we most admire. We too rarely practice what we preach to our composition students — namely that good writing is simple and direct. In fact, we're notorious for maze-y sentences and ugly jargon. The point seems less to attract readers with clear prose than to smack them over the head with a sign that says, "Aren't I smart?"

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Sports
4:49 pm
Wed April 18, 2012

Storied Basketball Coach Pat Summitt Steps Down

Originally published on Wed April 18, 2012 5:54 pm

The most successful coach in college basketball history is stepping down. Pat Summitt has led the women's basketball team at the University of Tennessee for 38 seasons, racking up 1,098 wins. She's dealing with early-onset dementia and will take the new position of head coach emeritus.

Theater
4:12 pm
Wed April 18, 2012

London Smash 'Two Guvnors' Comes To Broadway

Adapted from The Servant of Two Masters, the new comedy One Man, Two Guvnors follows the "always famished and easily confused" Francis Henshall (James Corden, left), who must combat his own befuddlement while keeping both of his employers — a local gangster and criminal-in-hiding Stanley Stubbers (Oliver Chris) — from meeting.
Tristram Kenton

Originally published on Wed April 18, 2012 5:54 pm

If you weren't a college theater major, you can be forgiven for not knowing much about commedia dell'arte, the 500-year-old theatrical tradition that Carlo Goldoni used for his comedy The Servant of Two Masters in 1743. Contemporary playwright Richard Bean has adapted that play into the decidedly British laugh riot One Man, Two Guvnors -- and he says all you really need to know about commedia is ... well, it's funny.

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Law
5:38 pm
Tue April 17, 2012

New Information Emerges In Secret Service Scandal

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 6:15 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

We have new information now in the investigation of Secret Service misconduct. Agents are alleged to have hired prostitutes before President Obama's visit to South America last week. The Secret Service director has been talking with members of Congress, and NPR's Ari Shapiro joins us now to tell us what he's hearing. Hey there, Ari.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Audie.

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Planet Money
4:34 pm
Tue April 17, 2012

Pay Your Taxes: A Cautionary Tale

Young Buck, 2004
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 6:15 pm

When IRS agents raided the house of rapper Young Buck, they seized all his things: his white leather dining chairs, his watches, his craps table, his tattoo kit. Even his refrigerator. The Nashville artist, who was once part of 50 Cent's G-Unit, owed hundreds of thousands of dollars in back taxes.

His lawyer, Robin Mitchell Joyce, said he thought Young Buck's taxes were being handled by his business manager. They weren't.

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Music Interviews
4:11 pm
Tue April 17, 2012

Kat Edmonson 'Just Wasn't Made For These Times'

"As usual, the party in my imagination is much grander than the actual one," Kat Edmonson says of the song "Champagne."
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 6:30 pm

A lot of the songs on Kat Edmonson's new album, Way Down Low, have a timeless sound, due in part to her own timeless-sounding voice. But she isn't above revealing her influences: The song "Champagne," she admits, was crafted with a particular American songsmith in mind.

"I was trying to write a song like Cole Porter," Edmonson tells NPR's Melissa Block. "Me and a million other people are trying to write a song like Cole Porter."

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My Guilty Pleasure
3:08 pm
Tue April 17, 2012

The Wrong Crowd: A Tale Of Teens Behaving Badly

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed April 18, 2012 10:26 am

Meg Wolitzer is the author of a book for young readers, The Fingertips of Duncan Dorfman.

In reality, I may be a middle-aged woman with two nearly grown sons, but in my heart I am a teenage girl who has found herself pregnant and doesn't know what to do. For if you came of age, as I did, reading Paul Zindel's My Darling, My Hamburger, then you probably still feel that you know what it's like to be a high school student whose life almost derails.

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