All Things Considered Weekend

Saturday and Sunday at 5PM
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Code Switch
5:46 pm
Sun January 25, 2015

Black Doll Show Inspires With Wakandan Heroes And Jazz Superstars

For the past 34 years, the William Grant Still Arts Center has held a Black Doll Show to showcase diverse dolls for children. The exhibit features dolls submitted by artists and collectors from around the country.
Priska Neely NPR

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 6:38 pm

At The William Grant Still Arts Center in the West Adams neighborhood in Los Angeles, jazz superstars and comic book superheroes are gathered together — in miniature, as part of the Black Doll Show.

For the past 34 years, the center has held a doll show to showcase diverse dolls for children. The exhibit features dolls submitted by artists and collectors from around the country. This year's theme is A League Supreme: Jazz Superheroes.

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Sports
5:24 pm
Sun January 25, 2015

Putting #Deflategate To The Test

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 6:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick held a surprise press conference yesterday, not to talk about next week's Super Bowl, but about, well, you know, deflated footballs.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

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My Big Break
5:24 pm
Sun January 25, 2015

How'd A Cartoonist Sell His First Drawing? It Only Took 610 Tries

After moving back home, Tom Toro didn't know what to do with his life. But a stack of magazines at a used book sale gave him an idea. "There they were," Toro says. "Cartoons in among the articles."
Courtesy of Tom Toro

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:46 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Tom Toro didn't always dream of becoming a cartoonist at The New Yorker. Sure, he drew cartoons in college, but he didn't see that as a career path. Instead, he went to film school at NYU.

Then he came to the sudden realization that he was in the wrong field — and he had no idea what he was going to do.

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Around the Nation
5:24 pm
Sun January 25, 2015

Rising Oceans A Slow-Moving Disaster, But Also A Business Opportunity

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 11:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Research News
6:14 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

Study Says Creativity Can Flow From Political Correctness

As the U.S. workforce continues to become more diverse, researchers are now more than ever examining diversity and bias in the work place.
iStockphoto

There is a common belief that requiring the use of "politically correct" language in the workplace stifles creativity.

Michelle Duguid, a professor at Washington University in St. Louis, tells NPR's Arun Rath that, intuitively, that assumption makes sense.

"People should be able to freely think, throw any crazy ideas, and any constraint would actually dampen creativity," Duguid says.

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Shots - Health News
5:39 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

'How Do You Tell Your Kids That You've Got Alzheimer's?'

When he was 59 years old, Greg O'Brien was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Five years later, he is speaking publicly about his experience, even as his symptoms worsen.
Courtesy of Greg O'Brien

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 5:36 pm

This is the first in a series, "Inside Alzheimer's," about the experience of being diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

In 2009, 59-year-old Greg O'Brien was a successful journalist and writer living in Cape Cod. He was healthy and happy — he exercised every day, made a good living, spent time with his three children and wife.

But he had also started to notice changes in himself. He was forgetting things, and his judgment sometimes seemed to fail him. Meanwhile, his own mother was dying of Alzheimer's disease.

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Sports
5:20 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

Former Wrestlers Sue, Say WWE Ignored Injuries

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 7:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Two fighters who used to perform for World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE, are suing the company, alleging that it ignored signs of brain damage. NPR's Jasmine Garsd has more.

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Code Switch
5:20 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

Between The Laughs, South African Comedian Hopes To Educate

Comedian Trevor Noah was born in South Africa during apartheid — "born a crime," as he says.
Byron Keulemans

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 7:15 pm

On Thursday, South African comedian Trevor Noah made his second appearance as a senior international correspondent on Comedy Central's The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.

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News
6:18 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Auto Loan Surge Fuels Fears Of Another Subprime Crisis

Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 6:29 pm

The number of Americans buying autos approached a record high last year. It's one more sign of how much the economy is improving.

But there's a big potential downside that's evoking comparisons to the subprime mortgage boom. Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit, and more of them are having trouble making payments.

When Chris Westervelt moved from Texas to Alaska to take a job, he decided to trade in his Mazda for a car that could handle snow and ice.

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Code Switch
5:24 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

In Recruitment Effort, Akron Police Seeks To Mirror The Community

The Akron Police Department training class works out at Kent State Basic Police Officer Training Academy. Donald Clayton is the only African-American in the class of 20.
M.L. Schultze WKSU

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 6:18 pm

Two years ago, the Akron, Ohio, police recruiting video began with pulsing music and an image of police in helmets and camouflage with assault rifles ready. This year, the most prominent video demonstrates how to prepare for the physical tests to be hired.

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Middle East
5:24 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

New Generation Of Saudi Royals In Line To Run Country

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 6:18 pm

For 62 years, Saudi Arabia has been ruled by sons of the founder of the Kingdom, Abdul Aziz. The new king is a part of this generation, as is the crown prince he has named. But eventually the monarchy will have to pass to the next generation, which is made up of thousands of princes. Robert Siegel talks to Middle East specialist Joseph Braude about Saudi succession.

NPR Story
5:24 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

UVA Sororities Push To Host Their Own Parties

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 6:18 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Nicolette Gendron, a member of Kappa Alpha Beta Sorority at the University of Virginia and a writer for the C-Ville Weekly. She did a survey of sorority members on campus about how they would feel if sororities were allowed to serve alcohol and host parties under the same rules as fraternities. She says most women, including herself, feel that women would have more control and feel safer from sexual predation if they could host parties in their own houses.

All Tech Considered
8:01 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Police Departments Issuing Body Cameras Discover Drawbacks

A Philadelphia police officer demonstrates a body-worn camera being used as part of a pilot project last December.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 1:03 pm

Wearable video cameras are fast becoming standard-issue gear for American police. The cameras promise a technological answer to complaints about racial bias and excessive force.

But in fact, the beneficial effects of body cameras are not well-established yet. And the police departments that rushed to buy them are now dealing with some unintended consequences.

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Parallels
7:40 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Saudi King Abdullah, Who Laid Foundation For Reform, Dies

Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud is seen in September 2011.
Ahmed Abdelrahman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 12:46 pm

King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud of Saudi Arabia has died. He was 90 and had been hospitalized for a lung infection.

Abdullah was born before Saudi Arabia was even a country. It was the early 1920s, and his father, Abdul Aziz ibn Saud, set out to conquer the tribes of the Arabian Peninsula. In one famous battle, ibn Saud surrounded the capital of a rival tribe.

"Famously, instead of executing everybody, he invited them to be his guests," says Robert Lacey, author of two books on Saudi Arabia.

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Business
6:18 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Family Dollar Shareholders Approve Takeover By Dollar Tree

Family Dollar shareholders agreed Thursday to sell the company to rival chain, Dollar Tree for $8.7 billion. Family Dollar turned down a bigger offer from Dollar General due to antitrust concerns.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 6:49 pm

The Great Recession hobbled the U.S. economy and crushed many businesses, but some companies thrived, including the so-called "dollar" stores.

Shoppers flocked to them because you could buy a lot with not much money. And as the economy rebounds, people are still going to some. But one chain, Family Dollar, hasn't kept pace with its competitors.

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Parallels
6:18 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

For Many French Jews, Anti-Semitism Has A Clear Source

French soldiers stand guard in front of the entrance of a synagogue in Lille, northern France, earlier this month.
Philippe Huguen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 8:18 pm

"Making aliyah," or returning to Israel, is usually a cause for celebration among Jews. But recently fear has pushed many Jews to leave France — a record 7,000 departed last year.

And that was before the recent Paris attacks that included the killing of four Jews at a kosher grocery store.

Jean Marc Illouz, a former senior correspondent for French television, who is also Jewish, says he's been pushing back against what he calls ridiculous comments on the Internet about anti-Semitism in France. He says Americans seem to think it's a resurgence of Nazism.

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Parallels
6:11 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

French Prisons Prove To Be Effective Incubators For Islamic Extremism

Cherif Kouachi, one of the brothers responsible for the Charlie Hebdo attacks, spent 20 months in Fleury-Merogis prison just outside Paris, where he crossed paths with a radical imam with ties to Osama bin Laden.This photo shows the men's building in May 2014.
Charles Platiau Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 7:57 pm

Among the sweeping changes France is proposing in the aftermath of this month's terrorist attacks in Paris are new measures to fight Islamic radicalization in its prisons. It is an enormous problem brought into starker relief because two of the suspects in the attacks earlier this month were products of the French penal system.

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Movie Interviews
5:13 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

'Red Army' Explores How The Cold War Played Out On Ice

The documentary Red Army profiles Viacheslav "Slava" Fetisov — one of the most decorated athletes in Soviet history.
Slava Fetisov Slava Fetisov/Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 10:14 am

When the U.S. Olympic hockey team upset the Soviet Union in 1980's "Miracle on Ice," President Jimmy Carter called coach Herb Brooks to congratulate him on the win.

"Tell the whole team that we're extremely proud of them," Carter said. "I think it just proves that our way of life is the proper way to continue on."

The other way of life, the Soviet way — which produced some of the best hockey players in the world — only went on for another decade or so.

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Europe
5:13 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Fighting Spikes Again In Ukraine

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 6:28 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Kiev-based journalist David Stern about the ongoing fighting in Ukraine. Ukrainian officials acknowledged on Thursday that rebel fighters had taken control of its airport in Donetsk. A trolley bus had also been shelled by artillery, killing at least eight people.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Shots - Health News
5:13 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

States Continue Push To Ban Abortions After 20 Weeks

Anti-abortion activists participate in the annual "March for Life" in Washington, D.C., on Thursday.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 8:32 pm

House Republicans decided Wednesday night to shelve a bill that would have banned abortion at 20 weeks post-conception. But 10 states already ban abortions at 20 weeks and two others are defending such laws in court.

Activists are pushing for bans in at least three more states; a panel in the South Carolina Legislature passed one Thursday.

But under the 1973 Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, a woman has the right to an abortion for several weeks after that, until the point when the fetus is considered viable.

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Around the Nation
7:00 pm
Wed January 21, 2015

California Prisons Aim To Keep Sex Between Inmates Safe, If Illegal

A Los Angeles County Department of Public Health worker shows condoms for weekly distribution to inmates in the Men's Central Jail.
George Lavender

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 8:13 pm

There's an inconspicuous metal box mounted on the wall of the gym at San Francisco County Jail No. 4.

When Kate Monico Klein turns a knob, the machine releases a condom in a small cardboard packet. Machines like this one — dispensing free condoms — are installed in all of the county's male jails.

"We set [the machine] off to the side, so that people would have a minor amount of privacy," explains Monico Klein, director of HIV services for Jail Health, a division of the county's health department.

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All Tech Considered
6:06 pm
Wed January 21, 2015

The Battle Over Open-Internet Rules Shifts To Congress

President Obama called on the Federal Communications Commission to implement a strict policy of net neutrality and to oppose content providers in restricting bandwidth to customers.
Michael Bocchieri Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 8:01 pm

In Tuesday night's State of the Union address, President Obama offered a number of ideas for improving the economy. Among them was a nod to the role the Internet plays in economic development.

"I intend to protect a free and open Internet, extend its reach to every classroom, and every community, and help folks build the fastest networks," Obama said.

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Sports
5:11 pm
Wed January 21, 2015

'Deflate-Gate' Is 'Sour Grapes' Or Serious Business, Depending Who You Ask

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 7:28 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
5:11 pm
Wed January 21, 2015

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Air Marshal Whistleblower

Former air marshal Robert MacLean blew the whistle after he was informed that missions on overnight, long-distance flights were being canceled. The announcement came just days after air marshals were warned of terrorist threats.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 7:30 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court, by a 7-to-2 vote, ruled in favor of a fired air marshal on Wednesday. In a decision of great interest to federal employees and air travelers, the court said that the air marshal's alert about safety concerns was shielded by the federal whistleblower protection law.

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Politics
5:11 pm
Wed January 21, 2015

Rep. Van Hollen: Obama's Focused On Helping Middle Class

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 7:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
5:34 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Africa's Soccer Tourney Takes Guinea's Mind Off Ebola

Guinea's defender Fode Camara (left) heads the ball over Ivory Coast's forward Wilfried Bony in the Africa Cup of Nations tournament.
Issouf Sanogo AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 9:22 am

Red, gold and green – Guinea's national colors — filled the streets of the capital, Conakry, early this morning. Guineans of all ages proudly wore the colors on their T-shirts, headbands, dresses and shorts. Children, with their cheeks and foreheads painted, ran around the street cheering, blowing whistles and waving their nation's flags.

But by 3 p.m. the streets were dead.

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Around the Nation
5:34 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

French Quarter Sees Violent Crime Surge; Residents Demand Changes

New Orleans police officer Patrick Schneider patrols Bourbon Street in the heart of the French Quarter on Saturday.
Jason Saul WWNO

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 11:25 am

New Orleans' most visited neighborhood rarely sees the type of violent crime that plagues other parts of the city. Recently, several high-profile robberies have rattled the region and led to criticism of the police department and the mayor, both of whom are rethinking safety measures.

Over the next few weeks, more and more visitors will roam the city's famous French Quarter, drinks in hand, for Mardi Gras. In less than 2 square miles, the French Quarter combines hotels, restaurants, street performers, and all-night bars with historic homes and tight-knit neighbors.

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Middle East
5:34 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Saudi Arabia Builds Iraq Border Wall To Protect Against ISIS

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 11:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Theater
5:34 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

How Broadway Is Losing Its 'Middle Ground'

Side Show tells the true story of conjoined twins who go from a freak show to vaudeville and try, unsuccessfully, to find love along the way. "We just did not get enough bodies and butts in seats that translate into word of mouth," says Side Show producer Darren Bagert. Above (from left): Ryan Silverman, Emily Padgett, Erin Davie and Matthew Hydzik.
Joan Marcus O+M Co.

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 11:03 am

Broadway is New York's biggest tourist attraction and brought in $1.3 billion in ticket sales last season. But it's also a high-stakes gamble for producers, since only 1 in 4 Broadway shows turns a profit. This month, two of the fall's most highly anticipated musicals, a revival of Side Show and The Last Ship, with songs by Sting, have thrown in the towel — closing, having lost almost their entire investments.

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Remembrances
4:49 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Instant Replay Inventor Changed The Way We Watch Sports

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 11:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

If you have watched any football on television recently then you have watched a lot of instant replay.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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