Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Mon February 25, 2013

Today's Three Stories To Read About 'The Sequester'

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 10:55 am

Barring a last-minute deal that at the moment seems unlikely, months of brinkmanship are set to culminate on Friday.

The sequester — $85 billion worth of across-the-board cuts in federal spending — will begin to kick in, with potentially serious economic consequences, including federal furloughs and the slashing of programs.

Here are three stories we've plucked from the ether that should give a good picture of what's going on as we approach sequester D-Day:

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The Two-Way
2:40 pm
Fri February 22, 2013

Aquarium Dumping Linked To Giant Tahoe Goldfish

You're going to need a bigger fishbowl.

Scientists searching for invasive species in Lake Tahoe scooped up a bright orange goldfish measuring nearly a foot and a half long and weighing more than 4 pounds, according to the website Live Science. (You can see it here.)

Environmental scientist Sudeep Chandra says a survey has uncovered a "nice corner" of the lake where about 15 other giant goldfish were living, apparently after being dumped there by aquarium owners.

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The Two-Way
10:13 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Tebow Won't Attend Controversial Megachurch Opening

Tim Tebow, center, leads a prayer after the Jets' loss to San Diego Chargers on December 23.
Jeff Zelevansky Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 10:54 am

Tim Tebow has bowed out of a promise to appear at the opening of a new megachurch in downtown Dallas whose pastor has been criticized for making derogatory remarks about non-Christians and homosexuals.

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The Two-Way
8:31 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Storm Buries Kansas, Missouri As It Heads East

Scene along I-35 near Kansas City on Thursday.
Orlin Wagner Associated Press

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 11:39 am

The biggest winter storm this season is causing delays and cancellations, and has brought traffic to a near-standstill in the Plains and Midwest, but it's providing much-needed relief for drought-stricken farmers.

According to Weather Underground Chief Meteorologist Jeff Masters, Wichita has its fifth biggest snowfall on record.

Winter Storm Q has dumped up to 17 inches of windswept snow in parts of Kansas and Missouri and is expected to extend its reach well into the Midwest on Friday.

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The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Thu February 21, 2013

Sen. Graham Says 4,700 Killed In U.S. Drone Strikes

U.S. "Predator" drone over Afghanistan in Jan. 2009.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 2:09 pm

We've all heard that drone strikes directed against al-Qaida and other militants have been on the rise, but now Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has put a number on deaths by U.S. unmanned aerial vehicle: 4,700.

Graham, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, rattled off the death toll during a talk he gave to the Easley Rotary Club in Easley, S.C., Tuesday afternoon.

"We've killed 4,700," Graham said.

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The Two-Way
8:56 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Winter Storm 'Q' Barrels Through Nation's Midsection

Snow-packed morning commute in Wichita on Wednesday.
Wichita Eagle MCT via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 2:02 pm

Update at 1:30 p.m. ET. State of emergency in Missouri.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has declared a state of emergency due to the heavy snowfall. The declaration allows state agencies to work directly with county and city emergency responders.

Jennifer Davidson of member station KSMU reports that about 40 people are staying at The Salvation Army in Springfield, which provides beds, blankets, and food for families in need.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Nation's West, Midwest In Path Of Massive Winter Storm

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 6:44 am

As many as 30 million people living from Oklahoma to the Ohio Valley are in the path of a storm moving east out of California that could dump several inches of snow in some areas and freezing rain and sleet elsewhere in the next few days.

According to the Weather Channel, the storm is caused by an "upper-level dip in the jet stream," on Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Antarctic Penguin Turns Up In New Zealand; Vets Say Condition 'Touch And Go'

The original "Happy Feet" ready for release aboard The New Zealand research vessel Tangaroa in Aug. 2011.
Hagen Hopkins Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:47 pm

New Zealand seems to be the destination of choice for wayward Antarctic penguins.

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National Security
12:07 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

How Could The U.S. Respond To Chinese Hacking?

A Chinese soldier stands guard Tuesday in front of the Shanghai building that houses military Unit 61398. A U.S. cybersecurity company says the unit is behind nearly 150 computer attacks on U.S. and other Western companies and organizations in recent years. China denies the allegation.
Carlos Barria Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 12:07 pm

If the Chinese military is regularly hacking into the computers of U.S. organizations, as an American security firm says, it raises all sorts of questions about how the U.S. should respond.

Is this a job for the military or the intelligence agencies? What role should diplomats and trade officials be playing?

The report issued this week by the IT security consultancy Mandiant says it has traced the hacking activity to the People's Liberation Army's Unit 61398, which has "systematically stolen hundreds of terabytes of data from at least 141 organizations."

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Japan: Probe Of Battery Fire On Boeing 787 Finds Improper Wiring

The first Boeing 787-881 Dreamliner delivered to All Nippon Airlines.
Keith Draycott FlickrVision

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 1:33 pm

Two reports on troubles with lithium ion batteries aboard Boeing's 787 Dreamliner:

In Japan, where a battery on an All Nippon Airlines 787 overheated and began smoking on Jan. 16, forcing the plane to make an emergency landing, the Transport Ministry released a report Wednesday saying it found that the battery in question had been improperly wired.

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Tue February 19, 2013

Newtown Shooter May Have Taken Cues From Norway Massacre

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 10:57 am

Investigators trying to piece together a motive in December's killings in Newtown, Conn., believe that 20-year-old shooter Adam Lanza may have been inspired by a similar 2011 massacre in Norway.

The Hartford Courant and CBS News report that authorities searching through Lanza's belongings after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary discovered several news articles about Anders Behring Breivik, who killed 77 people in Norway in July 2011.

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Business
3:10 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

As Cruise Industry Grows, So Have Its Problems

Coast Guard patrols near the cruise ship Carnival Triumph in the Gulf of Mexico on Monday. The Carnival Triumph lost propulsion power after an engine room fire a day earlier.
Jason Chambers AFP/Getty Images

It's been a rough voyage for the cruise-line industry in the past few years.

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The Two-Way
2:42 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Is Russia Marked For Meteors?

A hole in the ice of Chebarkul Lake where a meteor reportedly struck the lake near Chelyabinsk, about 930 miles east of Moscow
AP

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 8:53 am

Russians might be forgiven for thinking they have a big, fat celestial bull's-eye painted on their heads.

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The Two-Way
12:07 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Did The West Misjudge Kim Jong-un?

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (right) claps during a ceremony unveiling statues honoring his grandfather and father, Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il, respectively, in Pyongyang last April.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 2:35 pm

When the boyish Kim Jong Un assumed power in North Korea barely a year ago after his father's passing, speculation was that he might strike out a more open and less provocative path.

Figuring out what is or isn't going on in North Korea has long been an exercise in reading tea leaves, and no one predicting a thaw in the hard-line hereditary regime did so without qualification.

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Asia
6:55 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Despite Young Leader, N. Korea Still Cranks Out Old-Style Propaganda

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, accompanied by his wife, Ri Sol Ju, in a photo released last summer. For North Koreans, it was stunning to see the first lady at the leader's side. But North Korea still produces heavy-handed propaganda as well.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 8:57 am

Ahead of North Korea's latest nuclear test, the country launched a preemptive barrage of propaganda aimed at the West. But in the age of the Internet, has such ham-fisted messaging lost its punch?

The latest North Korean video, released on YouTube last week in apparent anticipation of Tuesday's test, is something of an amateurish production.

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The Two-Way
10:41 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Pope Benedict Leaves Behind A Mixed Legacy

Pope Benedict XVI in 2008.
Gerard Cerles AFP/Getty Images

When Pope Benedict XVI steps down at the end of the month, he will be remembered for his efforts to strengthen the Catholic Church's core beliefs and for his powerful and eloquent encyclicals, but also for a mixed record in handling the sexual abuse scandal.

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The Two-Way
12:37 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Portugal's Monster: The Mechanics Of A Massive Wave

American surfer Garrett "GMAC" McNamara rides what could be, if confirmed, the biggest wave conquered in history as a crowd watches Monday in Nazare, Portugal.
To Mane Barcroft Media /Landov

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 11:07 am

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World
1:30 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

From Here To Timbuktu: Myth And Reality At The World's Edge

Timbuktu was once considered so remote that the Paris-based Societe de Geographie offered 10,000 francs to the first non-Muslim to reach the city and report back.
Chris Kocek iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:16 pm

Timbuktu conjures up images of long camel caravans out on the edge of the sand-strewn Sahara — a remoteness so legendary that the ancient city is still a byword for the end of the earth.

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National Security
11:23 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Around The Globe, Women Already Serve In Combat Units

A female Israeli soldier runs during an urban warfare exercise at an army training facility near Zeelim, Israel, on June 19, 2008.
Ed Ou AP

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 12:55 pm

Israel, Germany and Canada are among the countries that have already marched down the path the U.S. will soon follow in allowing women a role in front-line combat units.

And most experts say the integration of women into such roles elsewhere has gone smoothly, despite concerns as to whether they would be up to the physical demands and about the question of fraternization between male and female troops.

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It's All Politics
4:04 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Divine Rhetoric: God In The Inaugural Address

George Washington referred to "that Almighty Being" during his inaugural address in 1789. "God" didn't show up in an inaugural speech until more than three decades later.
AP

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 4:46 pm

President Obama mentioned him five times in Monday's inaugural address — God, that is.

In modern times, religion has become so intertwined in our political rhetoric that the failure of any president to invoke God in a speech as important as the inaugural could hardly escape notice. Thanks to this graphic in The Wall Street Journal, we noticed the presidents who did (nearly all) and the few who didn't (Teddy Roosevelt, Rutherford B. Hayes).

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The Two-Way
5:27 pm
Fri January 18, 2013

When To Act? The Dilemma In Every Hostage Crisis

The remains of a burned-out U.S. helicopter and an abandoned chopper in the eastern desert of Iran on April 27, 1980, after the aborted American commando raid to free U.S. Embassy hostages.
AP

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:47 pm

At least some of the hostages seized by Islamic militants in Algeria reportedly died during a military rescue operation, once again illustrating the tough choices and dangers inherent in such efforts.

While many details are far from clear, NPR's Tom Bowman says U.S. officials believe three Americans were among those seized when the natural gas site was attacked by a group calling itself "the Signatories of Blood" on Wednesday.

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Africa
3:26 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Mali, Algeria Violence Stokes Fear Of New Terrorist Haven

A picture taken with a mobile phone earlier this month purportedly shows Islamist insurgents in Gao, Mali.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 4:04 pm

Hours after French troops launched a ground offensive in Mali to quash an Islamist rebellion, militants retaliated by seizing dozens of hostages, reportedly including Americans, in neighboring Algeria — an attack that underscores Western fears of a deteriorating security situation in northwestern Africa.

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U.S.
3:45 pm
Tue January 15, 2013

Newtown Prompts Gun Buybacks, But Do They Work?

A police officer holds an assault weapon turned in during a gun buyback in the Van Nuys area of north Los Angeles on Dec. 26.
Joe Klamar AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 1:42 pm

In the weeks since the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., communities across the country have wanted to do something about gun control, and many have turned to an old standby: buybacks.

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Your Money
1:26 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

Havens Are Turning Hellish For Tax Avoiders

A man enters a UBS bank in Hong Kong last month. The Swiss banking giant agreed in 2009 to identify the names of its U.S. account holders, part of a push by banking regulators to make it harder to hide income.
Dale de la Rey AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 7:43 am

Time was that a Swiss bank account was synonymous with confidentiality and keeping assets from prying eyes. No more.

Last week, Switzerland's oldest bank, Wegelin & Co., pleaded guilty in a New York court to helping Americans hide $1.2 billion from the Internal Revenue Service over a decade-long period. Wegelin's plea, and a $57.8 million fine, forced the bank to shut its doors. It follows a $780 million settlement with UBS in 2009 that forced the Swiss banking giant to identify the names of its U.S. account holders.

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It's All Politics
1:30 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

'Rum Cliff' And Other Close Shaves In The Tax, Spending Deal

The 'rum tax' is extended.
istock

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 3:12 pm

You might have thought the intense partisan negotiations over the so-called fiscal cliff were all about who wins and who loses when it comes to taxes and government programs.

And that assessment would be essentially correct — but some of the winners might strike you as a bit odd.

Tucked away in the bill's obscure cul-de-sacs are a bevy of obscure tax and spending provisions. We picked five for your perusal. Here goes:

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Ball In Boehner's Court After Senate Approves Fiscal Cliff Deal

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden make a statement regarding the passage of the fiscal cliff bill in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House late Tuesday evening.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 4:23 am

The House of Representatives voted 257-167 late Tuesday to pass a Senate-approved compromise deal that stops large tax increases for 99 percent of Americans, and delays massive spending cuts for two months.

The bill now goes to President Obama, who is expected to sign it into law.

NPR's S.V. Date is reporting on the deal for our Newscast unit. Here's what he says:

"The eventual deal was hammered out by Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell and Vice President Joe Biden. It passed the Senate with overwhelming, bipartisan support.

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The Two-Way
12:26 pm
Fri December 28, 2012

Port Strike Averted As Dock Workers, Terminal Operators Agree To Extension

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 4:46 pm

Longshoremen and East Coast and Gulf Coast port operators have agreed to an extension on labor negotiations, a federal mediator said Friday, averting a potentially crippling strike that would have halted container traffic at many of the nation's largest seaports.

Update at 4:45 p.m. ET: The temporary deal extends the contract to Feb. 6.

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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Mon December 24, 2012

A Moveable Feast: What Are You Leaving For Santa?

Aside from the traditional plate of cookies, some households planned to leave Santa gourmet surprises that would land most people on the naughty list at the local gym.
Larry Crowe AP

Milk and cookies might be the traditional Santa offering on Christmas Eve, but in at least one household, St. Nicholas will be getting smoked salmon and scotch.

It's just one out-of-the-ordinary example we gleaned from a call out to fans of NPR's Facebook page. Many of them involved a different sort of Christmas "spirit" — the kind that could push Mr. Claus over the legal limit, at least during the U.S. leg of his annual aerial circumnavigation.

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The Two-Way
1:03 pm
Fri December 21, 2012

Sen. Daniel Inouye Remembered As Quiet Inspiration

Sen. Daniel Inouye "embodied the spirit of aloha," President Obama said.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 6:10 am

At a service for the late Sen. Daniel K. Inouye at the Washington National Cathedral on Friday, President Obama said if it weren't for the example of the long-serving Hawaii Democrat, he might not have gone into public service.

Inouye "hinted to me what might be possible in my own life," Obama told the crowd, which included Vice President Joe Biden and other friends and former Senate colleagues.

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Shootings In Newtown, Conn.
3:04 pm
Tue December 18, 2012

Officials In Newtown Follow A Well-Worn Media Script

Lt. J. Paul Vance of the Connecticut State Police conducts a news briefing Saturday in Newtown, Conn. The strategy for dealing with the wave of news media in Newtown echoes that of some past tragedies, experts say.
Jason DeCrow AP

Fielding questions from reporters Friday in the first hours after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Connecticut State Police spokesman Lt. J. Paul Vance made one thing perfectly clear: The news media could consider him the one and only reliable source for information on the tragedy.

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