Colin Dwyer

Updated at 10:48 a.m. ET

An explosion ripped through a kindergarten in eastern China on Thursday, killing at least seven people and wounding dozens more, according to the country's state-run media. The blast hit the front gate of the building as parents and grandparents were picking up their children after the school day.

Updated at 3:26 p.m. ET

A gunman opened fire at a UPS facility in San Francisco on Wednesday morning, killing three people and later dying of a self-inflicted wound, police say. The shooting, which unfolded on the eastern edge of the city's Mission District, began at around 9 a.m. local time, just as the workday was getting underway.

Authorities said the gunman was wearing a UPS uniform. Company spokesman Kyle Peterson tells NPR that the shooter was a current UPS employee.

Two other employees were injured in the shooting, Peterson says.

When Leo Varadkar assumed power in Ireland on Wednesday, he blazed a trail of firsts: At 38 years old, the biracial son of an Indian immigrant father and Irish mother became the country's youngest-ever taoiseach, or prime minister.

He also became the first openly gay man elected to lead the Republic of Ireland, where homosexuality was illegal until just 24 years ago.

In the past two days, heavy rains have triggered a deadly spate of landslides in southeastern Bangladesh. The landslides and intense flooding have claimed the lives of at least 140 people in the region, according to local authorities — and they caution that with many people still missing, the death toll could climb even higher.

An attack on a prison in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has left at least 11 people dead, according to a provincial governor there. Julien Paluku, governor of North Kivu province, announced Sunday that 930 prisoners in the northeastern city of Beni escaped in the course of the attack.

Paluku says that eight prison guards number among the dead.

Only about 30 inmates remain in the prison in Beni, where authorities have declared a curfew.

Updated at 5:52 p.m.

Puerto Ricans overwhelmingly voted for U.S. statehood for their island in a nonbinding referendum on Sunday.

The Associated Press reports that only partial results are in but a low turnout and boycott by several opposition parties calls into question the validity of the non-binding vote.

Says the AP:

Sometimes, the French Open offers some shocking outcomes. Played on clay, a challenging and occasionally tricky surface for even the pros, the tournament has a habit of serving up some surprising winners. See Exhibit A: Jelena Ostapenko, yesterday's unseeded champion of the women's side.

Sometimes, though, things go precisely as planned.

Just over a week away from the formal start of Brexit negotiations, British Prime Minister Theresa May is scrambling to cobble together a new government in Westminster — and to maintain her own position in 10 Downing Street.

Updated at 5:35 p.m. ET

An Afghan soldier opened fire on his U.S. counterparts on Saturday, killing three Americans and wounding at least one other. A spokesman for the provincial governor of Nangarhar, in eastern Afghanistan, confirmed that the incident occurred during an operation in the district of Achin, on the Pakistan border.

Updated at 1:04 p.m. ET

Adam West, the actor behind one of the most beloved and enduring renditions of Batman, died Friday night at age 88. West donned the black mask of the Caped Crusader in the 1960s, playing the role as a plucky, intrepid hero for television.

At one point Saturday, it looked as if Simona Halep was on her way to her first ever major victory. She'd won the first set of the French Open against her unseeded opponent, and despite fierce play from Jelena Ostapenko, few onlookers expected the unseeded Latvian to mount a comeback.

So much for that.

The Philippine military suffered its worst day yet in its fight to reclaim Marawi from ISIS-linked militants, losing 13 marines during heavy door-to-door fighting on Friday. Yet the casualties — which bring the number of military deaths there to 58 — mark just a "temporary setback," a Philippine military spokesman said.

A looming decision about whether to abolish or shrink the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah should provide an early signal of how the Trump administration will deal with a long list of public lands issues.

The pirate north of the border has conceded defeat.

After five years of buying Trader Joe's products in the U.S. and selling them at a high markup in Vancouver — and fighting a protracted legal battle to keep doing so — the man behind Pirate Joe's has finally shuttered the secondhand store.

You might be wondering about the guy wearing a bucket on his head.

After more than two weeks of bloodshed, brutality and the creeping danger of starvation, Marawi remains a city under siege. Philippine authorities are reckoning with a mounting death toll — which by many media counts is more than 170 people — as well as the looming threat that the siege might become a bloody stalemate.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

The death toll from Saturday's terrorist attack in London has risen to eight, the city's Metropolitan Police said Wednesday. The announcement comes shortly after authorities recovered a body from the Thames River in east London.

Hayao Miyazaki's many fans worldwide just got an unexpected gift.

Studio Ghibli, the animation firm co-founded by the beloved anime director, plans to build a theme park dedicated to one of his most famous creations: My Neighbor Totoro. Hideaki Omura — governor of Japan's Aichi Prefecture, where the park is scheduled to open in 2020 — announced the plan at a news conference Thursday.

Just two days after a car bomb tore through Kabul, killing at least 90 people and injuring hundreds more, demonstrators took to the streets of the Afghan capital in droves to demand the resignation of top officials. But even as the demonstrations called for better security from extremist violence, further violence arose Friday as security forces opened fire on the protesters.

More than a week after ISIS-linked militants seized Marawi, the Philippine military suffered a significant blow in its bid to retake the southern city: The country's defense secretary, Delfin Lorenzana, announced Thursday that an errant airstrike killed at least 10 of the military's own soldiers and injured seven others.

The state of Ohio has sued five major drug manufacturers for their role in the opioid epidemic. In the lawsuit filed Wednesday, state Attorney General Mike DeWine alleges these five companies "helped unleash a health care crisis that has had far-reaching financial, social, and deadly consequences in the State of Ohio."

Named in the suit are:

  • Purdue Pharma
  • Endo Health Solutions
  • Teva Pharmaceutical Industries and subsidiary Cephalon
  • Johnson & Johnson and subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals

It has been more than 60 days since Venezuela's Supreme Court moved to dissolve the country's National Assembly. The move, intended to eliminate a thorn in the side of embattled President Nicolas Maduro, was reversed after three days — but the political fallout has barreled into its third month, roiling city streets across the country.

For a few hours Monday, the bitter face-off between a bull and a girl in New York City got a curious, four-legged interloper: a tiny pug, with one of those legs suggestively raised beside the girl's leg. There was no urine, no caustic caption, but it was clear where the dog's disdain was directed.

Timothy Loehmann, the police officer who shot and killed 12-year-old Tamir Rice in 2014, was fired by the Cleveland Police Department on Tuesday. At a news conference, city authorities announced that the reason for his termination wasn't the deadly incident that brought him to national attention, but rather violations he committed in the course of his hiring process.

By the end of the state legislative session in Texas on Monday, the Capitol had devolved into scuffles and grave accusations. A Democratic lawmaker had accused his GOP colleague of threatening to "put a bullet" in another lawmaker's head. That GOP state representative, meanwhile, accused a counterpart of threatening his life, saying he was prepared to use his gun in self-defense.

To understand how the day ended this way, one must first rewind to its start.

Updated 1:10 a.m. ET Tuesday:

Tiger Woods released a statement Monday night blaming medications for his arrest on a DUI charge in Florida.

"I understand the severity of what I did and I take full responsibility for my actions.

"I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. What happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications. I didn't realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly.

Updated at 4:11 p.m. ET

Through nearly four decades, at least five presidential administrations and seemingly countless Super Bowls and World Series, NPR listeners could depend on at least one thing in the ever-unpredictable world of athletics: Frank Deford. A mainstay on Morning Edition, the Hall of Fame sportswriter was public radio's scholar of sports for some 37 years before hanging up his cleats earlier this year.

It was a rough holiday weekend for British Airways.

Beginning Saturday, an incident the airline is describing as a "major IT systems failure" brought its operations to a grinding halt in the U.K. Thousands of passengers were stranded at the country's two major hubs in London — Heathrow and Gatwick — as flights were canceled, flyers endured long lines and bags became separated from their owners.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

Newly elected French President Emmanuel Macron and his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, had a whole lot of ground to cover Monday: Between the long-standing conflict in eastern Ukraine, the six-year-old civil war in Syria and their own countries' tattered ties, the Russian president's stop at the Palace of Versailles promised plenty of difficult topics for conversation.

In a South Carolina courtroom Friday, Todd Kohlhepp stood before a judge and pleaded guilty to murdering seven people. The plea was part of a deal he worked out with prosecutors, whereby Kohlhepp would avoid the death penalty and receive seven consecutive life sentences for killings committed across a span of approximately 13 years.

He was also sentenced to 60 years in prison for an assortment of other crimes, including kidnapping and sexual assault.

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