Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Salah Abdeslam, who was arrested in Belgium days before deadly bombings struck Brussels, is a step closer to going to France to face charges of being part of November's Paris attacks, after a Belgian judge approved his extradition.

Five star players from the U.S. women's national soccer team have filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, saying that the U.S. Soccer Federation pays the reigning World Cup champions far less than their male counterparts.

Emergency crews are scrambling to reach people trapped when an under-construction elevated roadway collapsed onto a busy street in Kolkata, India, on Thursday. More than a dozen people have died, local media say, and dozens more are trapped.

News of the number of dead or injured is still emerging, and those reports are currently fluctuating. Citing police, Asian News International reports that at least 14 people are dead, with more than 70 wounded.

If you're driving a Toyota Prius V outfitted with LED lights, you can breathe a sigh of relief: According to a new study of car headlights, it's the only midsize vehicle to get the top rating of "good" in a study of how 31 different cars light the road at night.

Former political prisoner Aung San Suu Kyi is now in charge of part of Myanmar's government, after a trusted ally in her party was sworn in as president Wednesday. Despite the change in leadership, Myanmar's military still holds significant power.

Suu Kyi was just steps away from her aide, U Htin Kyaw, when he was sworn in as president. Prohibited from seeking her country's top post, she now becomes Myanmar's foreign minister and will head other ministries, as well.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports:

His comments about female tennis players were in "poor taste and erroneous," Indian Wells CEO Raymond Moore says, after a backlash over his comments that women are along for the ride in a sport that's carried by men. Among those displeased: Serena Williams.

Here's part of what Moore said Sunday that caused the outcry:

"In my next life, when I come back I want to be someone in the WTA," Moore, 69, said with a laugh, "because they ride on the coattails of the men."

Moore, who was speaking at a news conference Sunday, continued:

More than a year after Nebraska and Oklahoma sought to sue Colorado over the carry-over effects of that state's law making recreational marijuana legal, the U.S. Supreme Court has denied the two states' complaint.

The court did not explain its decision, with which Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas disagreed. Thomas wrote a five-page dissent in which Alito joined (a reminder: the court is currently at eight members).

Extending a long-awaited trip to the NCAA men's basketball tournament, No. 12 seed Yale upset fifth-seed Baylor in the West region Thursday night. Yale notched its first-ever win at the Big Dance, 79-75, relying on strong defense and rebounding.

The historic win comes at the Yale Bulldogs' first trip to the NCAAs since 1962, as Yale's student newspaper reports. The paper adds, "The Ivy League's automatic NCAA Tournament bid has now resulted in five wins over the past seven tournaments."

After days of anticipation, a fuzzy wing flopped out of the remains of an egg shell Friday morning, signaling the hatching of a baby bald eagle who's been watched and fretted over, via an eagle cam set up at the National Arboretum in Washington, D.C.

The bird then worked its way out of its shell over the next hour, emerging more fully around 8:20 a.m. ET. Throughout the process, its parent eagle alternated between peering attentively (to be honest, eagles don't seem capable of anything but) and nestling over the fledgling and a second, as-yet-unhatched, egg.

A federal jury has convicted an Arizona man of weapons offenses, conspiracy to support ISIS, and other charges for his role in a terrorist attack in which two gunmen targeted an anti-Muslim event last spring in Garland, Texas.

It's the first jury trial in the U.S. that involves a homeland attack in the name of ISIS, according to the Justice Department.

From Phoenix, Mark Moran of member station KJZZ in reports:

If you're planning to hoist a pint of Irish dry stout for St. Patrick's Day, the folks at Guinness have a polite request: Don't slurp the foamy head off their beer. It's essentially a nitrogen cap, they say, that's protecting the flavors underneath from being oxidized.

St. Patrick's is a huge day for the legendary brewer – of the 70 million people who are estimated to be celebrating today, around 13 million will also drink a glass of Guinness.

Some 20 carmakers have committed to making automatic emergency braking systems a standard feature on virtually all new cars sold in the U.S. by 2022, according to a new plan from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

Automatic brakes are designed to stop a vehicle before it collides with a car or another object. Experts say that making them standard could prevent as much as 20 percent of accidents.

With a corruption and money-laundering scandal rocking Brazil, lawmakers in that nation's lower house of congress have started the formal impeachment process against President Dilma Rousseff, forming a committee to look at potential charges.

But the most dramatic moments Thursday center on the presidential palace, where a ceremony to officially invest former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva as the current chief of staff "broke into chaos," NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports.

The mathematics problem he solved had been lingering since 1637 — and he first read about it when he was just 10 years old. This week, British professor Andrew Wiles, 62, got prestigious recognition for his feat, winning the Abel Prize from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters for providing a proof for Fermat's Last Theorem.

One of two eggs laid by a mated pair of bald eagles in Washington, D.C., is hatching, according to officials watching the nest at the U.S. National Arboretum.

"We have a pip in process!!" said an update sent by the American Eagle Foundation on Thursday morning, which clarifies, "It's not technically a full pip until there is a full hole."

The hole in the shell appears to have grown larger as of mid-afternoon Thursday, but the eaglet has yet to emerge. The group says it could take between 12 and 48 hours for the eaglet to fully emerge from the shell.

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland is President Obama's pick to fill the Supreme Court seat left vacant by the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

Police killed one suspect during an anti-terror raid in Belgium thought to be linked to last November's Paris attacks. The raid, led by French and Belgian police, turned into a standoff with suspects inside the apartment. During the operation, in which there were at least three bursts of gunfire, four officers were wounded.

Police killed "an unidentified individual wielding a Kalashnikov — a gun used by some of the Islamic State militants in Paris," Reuters reports.

A discussion on Capitol Hill about concussion research brought a startling moment Monday, as an NFL executive acknowledged for the first time that football has been linked to a degenerative brain disease.

Jeff Miller, the NFL's executive vice president for health and safety, admitted the connection when he was asked about research by Boston University neuropathologist Dr. Ann McKee, who has reported finding signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in the brains of 90 out of 94 former pro football players — and 45 out of 55 former college players.

A mated pair of bald eagles that have nested in the U.S. National Arboretum since 2014 are now starting a family, taking turns incubating two eggs — and one of them could hatch sometime Tuesday. Two webcams are currently trained on their nest in Washington, D.C.

You can watch the webcam online — we'll note that the American Eagle Foundation warns, "This is a wild eagle nest and anything can happen."

Making official what was set in motion back in December, Pope Francis has approved the canonization of five new saints, including Mother Teresa. Hundreds of Mother Teresa's followers are expected to visit Rome when she's canonized on Sept. 4.

In addition to Mother Teresa, who was famously a tireless advocate for the poor, Francis approved final canonization plans for four other saints Tuesday. Here are there names, along with the Vatican's brief description of their lives and their canonization date:

For the third year in a row, Dallas Seavey is the first musher to reach Nome, Alaska, winning his fourth Iditarod championship overall. Seavey had been the first to reach the race's final checkpoints, ahead of his father, Mitch – another previous champion.

Seavey's team of seven dogs averaged nearly 9.5 miles an hour on the 1,000-mile journey, according to the Iditarod competition tracking website.

Saying her employer had failed to stand by her after she alleged being assaulted by Donald Trump's campaign manager, reporter Michelle Fields has resigned from conservative website Breitbart News. Editor-at-large Ben Shapiro also resigned.

"I can't stand with an organization that won't stand by me," Fields tweeted this morning.

Apollo Global Management says it's buying specialty grocery store chain Fresh Market Inc. for $1.36 billion in a deal that adds a premium of more than 20 percent to Fresh Market's closing stock price last week.

Based in Greensboro, N.C., the Fresh Market company was founded by Ray Berry; he and his son Brett together own nearly 10 percent of the company.

From a statement by Apollo Global Management:

After Amtrak's Southwest Chief train derailed just west of Dodge City, Kan., shortly after midnight Monday, in an incident that sent some 32 people to hospitals, investigators are focusing on a possible problem with the track. The train was carrying 131 passengers and a crew of 14, Amtrak says.

Earl Weener of the National Transportation Safety Board says there is an indication there was some misalignment in the rails.

After media reports charged massive overspending and waste by the Wounded Warrior Project, the organization's board of directors fired its CEO and chief operation officer Thursday. The charity has received hundreds of millions of dollars in yearly donations.

A former Russian press minister and aide to President Vladimir Putin who was found dead in a Washington, D.C., hotel last November died from blunt force injuries, according to a report from the chief medical examiner's office.

It's the first time an official cause of death for Mikhail Lesin has been announced in the case. When Lesin died four months ago, Russian media outlets reported that the cause was a heart attack, citing family members.

For the second time in as many days, Go champion Lee Sedol fished out one of the playing stones he'd captured from his opponent and placed it back on the board, admitting defeat against the computer program AlphaGo, which now has a 2-0 lead in their best-of-five series.

Names, addresses and phone numbers of some 22,000 ISIS recruits — and information about the network that recruited them — are reportedly part of a trove of data that Sky News says it received from a former member of the extremist group.

The identities of people from more than 50 countries, including Britain, European nations, the U.S. and Canada, are purportedly in the data, which Sky says it has shared with government authorities.

Despite controlling Myanmar's newly sworn-in parliament, the party led by Aung San Suu Kyi can't name her as a presidential candidate because she's ineligible under constitutional rules. Conceding that point Thursday, Suu Kyi wrote an apology to her supporters.

In the first of a series of games pitting Google's AI computer against a human world champion in the ancient game of Go, Google DeepMind's AlphaGo program has narrowly taken Round 1 from Lee Sedol.

Pages