Amy Kiley

Amy joined WUWM in January 2011 as an Announcer. She began her career interning for WBEZ-Chicago Public Radio and NPR affiliate WGVU in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She also served as News Director of her college station WNUR at Northwestern University.

Prior to joining WUWM, Amy served as an announcer and reporter for Northeast Indiana Public Radio. She also worked as a full-time bilingual writer and photographer for a Spanish- and English-language publication near Chicago. As a freelance journalist, she contributed several reports to WUWM’s Lake Effect program. Amy has won several journalism awards from The Hearst Foundations and Society of Professional Journalists.

She earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University. Amy also holds a master’s degree in music from Westminster Choir College and a master’s degree in liturgy from St. Joseph’s College.

Religion
4:42 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Roadside Service: Drive-In Church Brings God To Your Car

Sun, surf and sermons: At the Daytona Beach Drive In Christian Church in Florida, parishioners attend services by parking their cars in a grassy lot.
Amy Kiley WMFE

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:19 pm

When most people drive to church on Sunday, it's to sit for an hour-long service on uncomfortable wooden pews. Not at the Daytona Beach Drive In Christian Church in Florida.

As church attendance continues to decline in the United States, some parishes are doing what they can to draw congregants: embracing social media, loosening dress codes and even altering service times for big sporting events. At this church, people park in rows on the grass facing an altar on the balcony of an old drive-in theater. To hear the service, they switch on their radios.

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Economy
5:17 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Communities Debate Whether Sharing Services Saves Money

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

We're going to take a look this morning at how the economic downturn has hurt the places where we live - cities, counties, towns - and the ways that people are trying fight through.

MONTAGNE: We begin in Wisconsin, where, as in much of the country, municipalities are running out of sources of cash. Residents complain taxes are too high, then wince when services are cut.

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