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Our story last week about the connection between ADHD, movement and thinking struck a nerve with readers. We reported on a small study in which students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder performed better on memory tasks when they were allowed to spin and move around in a swiveling chair.

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Low oil prices have led to low gas prices in the United States, but not in Turkey, where gas is about $10 per gallon. Why would that be? We find out now from NPR's Peter Kenyon.

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Ireland could make history this week. Same-sex marriage is legal in about 17 countries around the world. In all of those countries, the decision was made by the legislature or the courts. Ireland appears poised to become the first country to legalize same-sex marriage through a national popular vote set for Friday.

In Dublin, it is impossible to miss the debate. Nearly every lamppost carries a big poster, or several.

"YES: Equality for everybody," reads one showing a diverse group of smiling people.

Is it the mercury or the malaria?

Or maybe it's something else entirely that's making people sick in the Peruvian Amazon.

Those questions are bedeviling researchers from Duke University who have been studying gold mining in the region. Illegal mining has exploded in the area in the past decade, and the people living downriver have a variety of medical issues, from malaria to anemia to high blood pressure.

PODCAST: American cars in Russia

May 19, 2015
David Brancaccio

First up, we'll talk about the Supreme Court's ruling on 401(k)s, and what it means for workers. Plus, we look at the job ahead of Keith Hall, the new head of the Congressional Budget Office. His role is meant to be a non-partisan scorekeeper, but we look at the difficulties of remaining independent in a charged political atmosphere. And America's car makers are struggling to keep their businesses in Russia on the road as the country's economy stalls. However as we find out, car factories in Detroit are not the only ones feeling the cold winds of Russia's troubled economy.

Marketplace Tech for Tuesday, May 19, 2015

May 19, 2015
Marketplace

The Congressional Budget Office: staying above the fray

May 19, 2015
Tracey Samuelson

Keith Hall, director of the Congressional Budget Office, will offer his first Senate testimony Tuesday since taking the helm of the nonpartisan agency in early April. It’s also the first oversight hearing for CBO in over three decades, according to the Senate Budget Committee.

The primary focus will be the agency’s 2016 budget, drafted under Hall’s predecessor.

During the worst of the Great Recession, summer travel plummeted as Americans chose backyard "staycations" over faraway vacations.

This year, millions of families are shaking off their reluctance to take big trips: Airlines say they are now expecting the busiest summer ever.

About 80 percent of Americans now live in urban areas, and more and more of us are growing food in cities as well.

But where's an urban farmer to turn for a soil test or when pests infiltrate the fruit orchard?

The challenge of strategizing the best route to work against the herd of other drivers can be as routine as the daily commute itself. A number of apps are out there to help shortcut one's route and evade traffic jams. But which ones are the most accurate? And how?

The All Tech Considered team put a few competing traffic apps to the test in Robert Siegel's usual short commute from Arlington, Va., to NPR's D.C. headquarters.

The Test Drive

This ride is about 15 minutes in no traffic. But it's now morning rush hour.

Shirin Neshat, the most famous contemporary artist to come from Iran, is playing with her rambunctious Labrador puppy in her airy Manhattan apartment. "Ashi, Ashi, come here!" she calls.

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More on this subject now from someone who says all the focus on police is bogus.

O'DONNELL: All right, so it's review day today. Everybody's up for the review?

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Performance artist and sculptor Chris Burden died last week of cancer. He was 69. Today, his final completed work opens to the public at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, or LACMA. NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports.

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Elian Gonzalez, the Cuban boy who was seized 15 years ago from his relatives in Miami by U.S. government officials who returned him to his native country, says he would like to visit the United States as a tourist.

World Cafe Next: Cayetana

May 18, 2015

The three women who form Cayetana — Kelly Olsen, Allegra Anka and Augusta Koch — made a thrilling debut last year with Nervous Like Me. They're a big part of why Philly's homegrown rock scene has gotten so much attention lately.

The biker gang shootout this weekend in Waco, Texas, that left nine people dead, 18 wounded, and as many as 192 facing organized crime charges has sparked a lot of scrutiny over how police and media are treating this incident compared with how they approached the protests in Ferguson, Mo., and Baltimore.

Cate Le Bon wrote some of my favorite words of 2013 on her album Mug Museum. White Fence is the swirly psych-like music of Tim Presley. Cate and Tim are friends — Cate played guitar on a tour with White Fence — and so now there's this: DRINKS.

Waxahatchee On World Cafe

May 18, 2015

Cellphones Or School? What Makes Kids Around The World Happy

May 18, 2015

What's bugging children around the world?

Kids in South Africa say they're not very happy about their opportunities to play safely outdoors. Kids in Algeria and Ethiopia say they don't get enough time to play, in general, because they are needed at home to help with siblings and chores. Kids in European countries are less satisfied with their time in school than those in some African countries.

Voters in more than half the states will soon be able to register online, rather than filling out a paper form and sending it in.

Twenty states have implemented online voter registration so far, almost all in the past few years. Seven other states and the District of Columbia are now in the process of doing so. That includes Florida, where Republican Gov. Rick Scott signed a bill last Friday requiring the state to allow online voter registration by 2017.

Gender Pronouns And The History Of 'They'

May 18, 2015

The use of the word “they” as a gender-neutral singular pronoun is gaining wider acceptance, even among copy editors. But linguist and Wall Street Journal columnist Ben Zimmer says the use of the universal pronoun ‘they’ is nothing new.

Zimmer tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that writers including Chaucer and Shakespeare have used “they” instead of he or she. But will modern-day English speakers adapt their style to incorporate “they”?

There’s a new term that is unfortunately now a part of our lexicon: selfie-stick.

You’ve seen them. The idiotic plastic or metal arms that tourists all over the world are using to take medium-distance selfies with their phones.

I was in Europe last week and I saw it for myself: In front of the Rosetta Stone at the British Museum in London, underneath the Eiffel Tower in Paris, even on a train a couple decided to take a photograph of themselves from above.

How does free college sound?

Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders will propose legislation on Tuesday that would make tuition at four-year public colleges free – much like it is in many European Countries.

Here & Now’s Robin Young talks to Scott Jaschik, editor of Inside Higher Ed, about how various European countries offer free college tuition, and how well such a model might work in the United States.

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