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With Donald Trump’s decisive victory Tuesday night in Indiana, the candidate’s supporters are celebrating his new status as the party’s likely nominee in Cleveland this July. North Dakota’s Congressman Kevin Cramer, who conducted his own straw poll because the state party didn’t hold a caucus or a primary, backs Trump and explains why. He speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

On this week’s DJ session, KCRW’s Raul Campos highlights what’s spinning in his head, including self-professed “southern fried soul” ban, The Echocentrics of Austin and young LA-based dance duo Classixx. He also shares new music from Brett Dennen and DJ Shadow with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Songs in the Segment

“Staring At The Ceiling” (feat. James Petralli) by The Echocentrics (Echo Hotel, 2016)

[Youtube]

“Cassidy” by Brett Dennen (Por Favor, 2016)

The teen clothing retailer Aeropostale filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Wednesday, and announced that it would close 113 stores in the U.S., amid changing shopping habits by its customers. Also this week, the parent company of the grocery chain Fairway, in New York, Connecticut and New Jersey, announced its own Chapter 11 bankruptcy, as the store group faces competition from the likes of Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake about what’s behind the bankruptcies.

The Bush Administration now offers grants for Americans to study languages such as Arabic. We travel to Cairo where language schools are full of American students. Also, a conversation with self-described language fanatic Elizabeth Little. And a journey through the linguistic politics - and just plain silliness - of the Eurovision Song Contest.

In this edition of The World in Words, linguist Derek Bickerton talks about his lifelong love of creoles and his attempt to create a new language on a desert island. Also former speechwriter Gregory Levey on how he nearly got an Israeli prime minister to channel Seinfeld.
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In this edition of The World in Words: Russian. What names like Putin, Stalin and Medvedev mean. Also, outgoing President Putin likes to quote Russian poetry - as much as seems to enjoy coarse street language. We end with the confessions of a hopelessly unqualified Israeli government speechwriter.
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Time to check your frozen fruit and vegetable packages: CRF Frozen Foods has expanded a voluntary recall to include about 358 products under 42 different brands because of potential listeria contamination.

A full list of the items to avoid was included in the company's press release on Monday. The recall includes all frozen organic and nonorganic fruit and vegetable products manufactured or processed at CRF's facility in Pasco, Wash., since May 1, 2014.

Donald Trump, the man who would not run, could not be taken seriously and could not win, is the apparent nominee of the Republican Party.

The office in question is the presidency of the United States.

Bernie Sanders is staying in the race until the last primary and the nation will be better off for it, he told NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview that will air Thursday on Morning Edition.

Inskeep, passing on questions he had invited on Twitter, asked Sanders if he is "threatening [his] revolution" by continuing to run, potentially scaring some voters away from supporting Hillary Clinton — the likely Democratic nominee — in November.

Frozen vegetables are a staple in many diets, so a huge recall of them has us peering at the packages in our freezers.

On Tuesday evening, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced an outbreak of the deadly Listeria monocytogenes bacteria — and frozen vegetables and fruits are believed to be the cause.

Panama City is bustling with construction. At least half-a-dozen cranes dot its picturesque, oceanfront skyline, teeming with glass towers.

At one site, real estate broker Kent Davis steps into a construction elevator in a nearly completed 30-floor apartment building. Seventy percent of the apartments have already been sold.

The musician Prince had an appointment to meet with an addiction doctor the day after he died, a lawyer for that doctor said during a news conference this afternoon.

Minnesota Public Radio reports:

It's 2:00 p.m. and you have a few more hours until the end of your workday.

Your eyes sting, your vision is getting blurry and your head hurts. The computer screen that you've been staring at for the past six hours seems so bright that you want to shut your eyes.

Sound familiar? We'd bet yes.

Piotr Le, a Georgetown University grad student, thinks so, too. He used to work in consulting — and that meant staring at a computer screen for 12 or more hours every workday.

The Ted Cruz event in Indianapolis on Tuesday night — deemed an election night watch party — was set to begin at 7 p.m. ET, right about the time Cruz supporters found out their guy had lost Indiana by a whopping margin. But just about everyone stayed after the news got out. Because when you're a supporter, you're a supporter.

They thought that once Cruz took the stage, he'd rally the troops and declare, yet again, that he would take his floundering presidential campaign all the way to the Republican National Convention in July, hoping for a delegate miracle on a second ballot.

How pingpong tables are an economic indicator

May 4, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

Let's call it the pingpong table index.

There's been speculation here and elsewhere that we're in a tech bubble and that as all bubbles do, it will eventually pop.

The Wall Street Journal got creative, went out to Silicon Valley and talked to a pingpong table salesmen. Pingpong tables being one of those icons often found in startups and tech companies.

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Al Masirah/Ameen AlShami

On July 3, 2015, Ibrahim Abdulkareem's home was hit by a Saudi airstrike, with his family inside. “It was 1:30 in the morning,” Ibrahim writes in Arabic, “we were sleeping.”

Ibrahim, the father of two, awoke to the sound of his wife screaming. She was pinned under the rubble of their collapsed walls. His son appeared to be OK. But his young daughter was completely buried in plaster and stone. EMTs arrived and they dug her out. The girl, her brother and their mother were rushed to area hospitals.

The population of northern Colorado is booming, and we're not just talking about people here.

The number of dairy cows is now higher than ever.

At the northern edge of the state, Weld and Larimer counties are already home to high numbers of beef and dairy cattle, buttressed by the region's numerous feedlots, which send the animals to several nearby slaughterhouses. But an expansion of a cheese factory owned by dairy giant Leprino Foods will require even more cows.

Let's say a pregnant woman develops high blood pressure.

In ordinary circumstances, her medical team will monitor her condition. If there's a threat to the fetus, the doctor might want to bring on labor early. In the end, mother and baby are usually fine.

But what if she's living in a war zone?

First of all, she might not know she has the condition. Sometimes a pregnant woman with high blood pressure shows no symptoms. And amid the chaos of combat, regular checkups may be hard to arrange.

Marketplace for Wednesday, May 4, 2016

May 4, 2016
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Sabri Ben-Achour

If big money doesn't support Trump, does it stay home?; a look at the mechanics of counting votes; and Hulu announced it would offer a low-cost streaming package of television channels.

Zimbabwe says it is putting some of the wild animals in its reserves up for sale because of the severe drought that has hit the country.

That's according to a statement from the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (known as ZimParks) that was carried by Reuters and CNN.

Ben Harper recorded with the Innocent Criminals from 1997 through his 2007 album, Lifeline. Since then, he's worked solo and with Relentless7 — until now. The Innocent Criminals join Harper on his new album, Call It What It Is.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Scientists have been able to make and study human embryos in their labs for decades. But they have never been able to keep them alive outside a woman's womb for more than about a week.

That limitation meant scientists were unable to conduct a range of detailed research into early human development.

But now researchers say they have discovered a way to keep human embryos alive in the laboratory about a week longer than ever before, and through a critical period of development.

Hulu confirms plan to launch new TV streaming service

May 4, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Adrienne Hill

At a presentation to advertisers Wednesday in New York, on-demand TV service Hulu confirmed plans to launch a service to rival traditional cable, a so-called "skinny bundle." There's no word on exactly which broadcast channels and cable networks will be part of the plan, or what it'll cost, but the industry expects content will come from Hulu’s current owners, including Disney and 21st Century Fox.

Flint's troubles mount as home prices fall 21 percent

May 4, 2016
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Mitchell Hartman

President Barack Obama went to Flint, Michigan, on Wednesday where he met with local and state officials and residents, and got a personal look at the lead contamination crisis there.

Donald Trump is the apparent GOP presidential nominee after his two remaining rivals ended their White House bids.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich suspended his campaign Wednesday evening in Columbus. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz dropped out of the race Tuesday night after a disappointing loss in Indiana.

The rapid moves in the past 24 hours bring to a close a wild GOP primary season that leaves the one-time unlikely candidate as the party's apparent nominee.

Impressed, we are. With your #StarWarsDay celebrations, that is. The fourth is strong on the Interwebs.

It's a time for Star Wars-themed treats.

(Even here at NPR.)

And an excuse to show your creative side.

Of course, even this sacred day is not free of the presidential campaign.

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson says he's "acutely aware" of longer wait times at airports, and now he's boosting staffing at checkpoints, hoping to avoid even longer wait times that had been projected for this summer.

The move comes after officials predicted "long waits in epic lines," as NPR's Marilyn Geewax reported in March.

With Trump the nominee, where will big donors go?

May 4, 2016
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Sabri Ben-Achour

With Donald Trump as the presumptive nominee, there’s a big question about where the Republican establishment and Trump’s former opponents are planning on putting their support. Lean in for the party? Put up a third party choice?  Phone it in?

Behind this question is a more brass tacks issue: Where is the big Republican money going? 

In general, the largest donors are not trying to buy access.

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