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Negotiators in the House and Senate have reached a deal on a bill to fund the government through Dec. 9.

Republicans and Democrats have been arguing for weeks to find a way forward before the Sept. 30 deadline in order to avoid a government shutdown.

Last week, negotiations in the Senate appeared to be at a standstill, with Democrats in both chambers insisting that the most recent Republican offer was not enough.

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Andy Uhler

The merger of the world’s largest and world’s second largest brewers was agreed upon by shareholders today.

AB InBev won approval to acquire SAB Miller for more than $100 billion. The deal means that about one in every four beers sold around the world will be a product of this mega-brewer.

Bart Watson, chief economist for the Brewers association, said the new company is going to look to emerging markets.  

“This wasn’t about the U.S. market as much as it was about developing markets where SAB Miller was strong and where AB InBev was weak,” he said.

For all the changes wrought by the sexual harassment scandal that brought down former Fox News Chairman Roger Ailes, the Murdoch family that controls the network has held one goal paramount: to maintain continuity.

The Arizona Republic has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president — the first time the newspaper has backed a Democrat in its history.

The Republic's editorial board writes that Clinton understands what the position demands: "a steady hand, a cool head, and the ability to think carefully before acting." And it pointedly concludes that her Republican rival, Donald Trump, does not.

More than a quarter of the Food and Drug Administration employees who approved cancer and hematology drugs from 2001 through 2010 left the agency and now work or consult for pharmaceutical companies, according to research published by a prominent medical journal Tuesday.

Dr. Vinay Prasad, a hematologist-oncologist and assistant professor at Oregon Health and Science University, sought to understand the so-called "revolving door" between the FDA and the pharmaceutical industry, which he said is often discussed but hadn't been quantified.

On Tuesday, a police officer in the San Diego suburb of El Cajon, Calif., shot and killed an unarmed black man, sparking protests in the area.

El Cajon police Chief Jeff Davis said Tuesday night that police were on the scene because the man's sister had called 911, reporting that her brother was "not acting like himself," Andrew Bowen of member station KPBS reports.

Herschell Gordon Lewis, who died earlier this week at the age of 87, wore several hats over the course of his life: advertising copywriter. Self-styled direct-marketing guru. And, most famously, director of exploitation films of various stripes (nudie, splatter, nudie-splatter).

A Dutch-led team of international investigators has concluded that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, which crashed in July 2014, was shot down by a Russian Buk missile that had been transferred into rebel-held eastern Ukraine.

After the shooting, the surface-to-air missile launcher was transferred back to Russia.

Marketplace for Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Sep 28, 2016
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Scott Tong

Today on the show, we look at efforts to reduce airplane emissions and solve airplane crashes. Plus: Part two of our look at manufacturing in Rochester, New York and a massive beer merger.

How to solve a plane crash

Sep 28, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

The Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 that crashed in July 2014 was shot down by a Russian-made missile, according a Dutch-led team of international investigators.

Christine Negroni was not one of those investigators, but she has been a part of others. She also wrote the new book, "The Crash Detectives: Investigating the World's Most Mysterious Air Disasters."

On starting an investigation:

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2 Couples In Love Attract Attention

Sep 28, 2016
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We've all been there — having fun relaxing with friends and family, when someone says something a little racially off. Sometimes it's subtle, like the friend who calls Thai food "exotic." Other times it's more overt, like that in-law who's always going on about "the illegals."

In any case, it can be hard to know how to respond. Even the most level-headed among us have faltered trying to navigate the fraught world of racial awkwardness.

From the ground, flying is a wonderfully loose metaphor — for freedom and speed and ambition, for superhuman ease and laborless achievement. But Fran Wilde's Bone Universe series makes flying a fatal and real technical science. It isn't magic, but a controlled harnessing of something terrifyingly strong: the wind. The taut violence of flight — catching gusts, snapping wings, shaving the air — is the best and most real part of the novels. Not a broomstick whoosh or the effortless flutter of a superhero's cape, but groaning joints, deadly winds, an awful void below.

Even though Marca Engman read countless books, watched YouTube videos and took a beekeeping class before installing her first hive in 2012, she knew she'd need help in the field.

"The whole idea of beekeeping was overwhelming," she recalls. "Every year is different and every hive is different."

Rather than working a backyard beehive solo, Engman installed her first hive in the community apiary at Hudson Gardens, a nonprofit garden near Littleton, Colo.

No government rescue for Germany's Deutsche Bank

Sep 28, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about a decline in the price of U.S. groceries; Whole Foods' opening of a store in Chicago's Englewood neighborhood — a region with a 21 percent unemployment rate; a $41 million clawback from Wells Fargo's CEO; and Deutsche Bank's financial woes.

Tech Intervention: driverless chairs

Sep 28, 2016
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Molly Wood

It's time for another ... Tech Intervention. 

Nissan this week unveiled some new self-driving tech that, we believe, does not need to exist.  It's a fleet of self-driving chairs.  The chairs are meant to move people along in a line. Each one senses the chair in front of it, and then scoots you along so you don't have to stand while you're queued up for your cronut.  

The chairs are only going to be released in certain restaurants in Japan in December of this year. But I think we can all agree that this is a microchip too far. 

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Scott Tong

Airlines around the world would be required to stop adding to their carbon footprints, under a U.N.-sponsored proposal being negotiated in Montreal. The aviation sector was not covered under the international climate agreement agreed to in Paris last year.

Here's how the proposal would work: if emissions at, say, Delta or United go up, the carriers would have to react. One option: innovate and, burn less petroleum, and reduce carbon pollution emissions.

Alabama Republican Chief Justice Roy Moore is fighting to keep his job. He's accused of violating judicial ethics for telling local judges they were bound by Alabama's gay marriage ban — and not the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark ruling legalizing same-sex marriage.

His trial is set to start Wednesday. He's been suspended pending the trial, and faces removal from the bench.

Judy Maggiore remembers looking in the mirror in college, perplexed by her body's disproportion.

"I was skinny. I was a stick. The upper part of my body was really, really thin. You could see my ribs!" exclaims Maggiore. "But from the waist down, it was like there were two of me or something."

Tree-trunk-like legs and a slim upper body are the signature characteristic of a lipedema patient. You can starve yourself and exercise for hours a day and the fat will not regress. But Maggiore didn't know that at the time. She swore off bathing suits and hit the gym fanatically.

First, a story:

Late one night, a man searches for something in a parking lot. On his hands and knees, he crawls around a bright circle of light created by a streetlamp overhead.

A woman passes, stops, takes in the scene.

"What are you looking for? Can I help?"

"My car keys. Any chance you've seen them?"

"You dropped them right around here?"

"Oh, no. I dropped them way over there," he says, gesturing vaguely to some faraway spot on the other side of the lot.

"Then why are you looking here?"

The man pauses to consider the question.

The Senate voted Wednesday to give families of 9/11 victims the right to sue the Saudi Arabian government, overriding President Obama's veto for the first time.

The vote was lopsided, with 97 Senators voting in favor of the override, well above the two-thirds majority needed to overcome the president's objection. Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid cast the lone "no" vote. Senators Tim Kaine, D-Va. and Bernie Sanders, D-Vt. did not vote.

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Lane Wallace

Wells Fargo’s board of directors is asking for its money back following the false account scandal at the bank.

Food prices are insanely cheap right now

Sep 28, 2016
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Adam Allington

You may have noticed you're spending a lot less on eggs, milk and meat these days.

Across the country, grocery prices are falling, and are on track for the longest stretch of falling food prices in more than 50 years.

The bargains may be great for shoppers, but are causing increasing pain for producers further upstream.

Whole Foods opens a store in Chicago 'food desert'

Sep 28, 2016
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Natalie Moore

Whole Foods employees are putting the finishing touches on the new South Side Englewood store in Chicago. Shelves are going in. The marquee sign is getting a touch up. This low-income black neighborhood grapples with numerous issues – foreclosures, unemployment and violence.

It’s also a food desert, an area where there’s more fast food than healthy food. More junk food corner stores than grocers. In short, not exactly Whole Foods’ sweet spot demographic.

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