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Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, running in the Democratic presidential primaries, has raised about $15 million, his campaign said Thursday.

His campaign emphasized the grass-roots strength of his fundraising: 250,000 donors making nearly 400,000 contributions of $250 or less.

The numbers come from a quarterly disclosure report being filed at the Federal Election Commission, and are measured from when Sanders launched his campaign April 30.

Jeff Mitchell/Reuters

Who Is Burning Black Churches? This week's hashtag is, unfortunately, not asking a new question.

The flaming destruction Tuesday of Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church in Greeleyville, South Carolina inspired imagery on social media from the civil rights movement.

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As President Obama promised, a new rule would make 5 million more Americans eligible for overtime pay.

Many workers say it's a welcome change. But businesses say employees could see negative, unintended consequences.

Barrett Zenger has managed a music store in Corpus Christi, Texas, for the past seven years, where he oversees two dozen employees, stocks inventory and fills in for sales clerks who call in sick.

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This-low budget video of a young man flipping, spinning and sliding has probably become the most viral breakdancing clip to ever come out of Tunisia — and not because of the dancer’s moves.

"He’s a poor dancer,” jokes Ilyesse, an 18-year-old who’s one of the top 16 breakdancers in Tunisia, “but he’s a skilled terrorist.”

A curious detail appeared in stories about the death this week of a 17-year-old boy from Ebola.

For the last 44 years, you could ask Maria how to get to Sesame Street, but not any more. Sonia Manzano, the actress who has played the character since 1971, is retiring and won't be part of the next season.

Manzano, 65, announced the news earlier this week at the American Library Association Annual Conference.

By definition, international adoption is a transaction between unequals. It takes desperation to relinquish a baby, and privilege to adopt one. Those disparities led to abuses in Guatemala’s adoption system that resulted in its shutdown in 2008. Unless you’re Guatemalan, you can’t adopt a Guatemalan baby now.

Before the shutdown, US families adopted about 30,000 Guatemala-born children. One of them is my son, Diego.  We met his birth family when I went to get him in 1999. He was five-and-a-half months old.

bradleypJohnson

Give more money to keep people happy and healthy — that’s the bet the city of Utrecht in the Netherlands will be taking soon.

Following the principles of “basic income,” Utrecht will be giving between $900 and $1,450 per month to households already receiving welfare. Recipients will be free to spend it as they wish.

Maybe it seems like just yesterday that you were storing away your holiday decorations.

Maybe it actually was yesterday because life gets busy and tasks get put off, and before you know it, half the year is over and you're scrambling to catch up.

So in case you have been too busy to pay close attention, here's what we now know about the just-ended half of this year's economy:

Adm. Michael Rogers is among the American officials most likely to know which country perpetrated the Office of Personnel Management's massive data breach, possibly the biggest hack ever of the U.S. government. He's not only director of the National Security Agency, but also heads the U.S. Cyber Command.

Can racism cause post-traumatic stress? That's one big question psychologists are trying to answer, particularly in the aftermath of the shooting at the historically black Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., and the recent incidents involving police where race was a factor.

What's clear is that many black Americans experience what psychologists call "race-based trauma," says Monnica Williams, director of the Center for Mental Health Disparities at the University of Louisville.

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Instead of ignoring the strange things a woman's body does through motherhood and aging, Deborah Landau's new collection revels in them. It's called "The Uses Of The Body." Tess Taylor has our review.

For the past several years, the group Coexister has been going into secular French schools to break down religious stereotypes in the classroom.

Since January's attacks on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and a kosher supermarket, the demand for their interventions has skyrocketed.

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Now we're going to meet a young entrepreneur.

JOHN POTTER: My name is John Potter and I've been using Airbnb to rent out my tent in the backyard.

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Sam Outlaw On World Cafe

Jul 2, 2015

Unlikely though it may seem, "Outlaw" is Sam Outlaw's mother's maiden name. As it happens, the L.A. country singer, whose debut album is appropriately called Angeleno, has an improbable story to go with that name.

Scientists say they've found a bit of DNA in woolly mammoths that could help explain how these huge beasts were so well-adapted to live in the cold of the last ice age.

Woolly mammoths had long shaggy fur, small tails and ears to minimize frostbite, and a lot of fat to help stay warm as they roamed the tundra more than 12,000 years ago.

The self-declared Islamic State has released photos purportedly of its fighters destroying an ancient artifact in the Syrian city of Palmyra weeks after the Islamist extremists captured the city.

A "priceless" 2,000-year-old statue of a lion dating from the city's Roman heritage is seen being smashed in what Syrian antiquities director Maamoun Abdelkarim tells Agence-France Press is "the most serious crime [ISIS has] committed against Palmyra's heritage."

Gareth Finney steps inside his 350-year-old pub in Faversham, England, and recounts the day last month when the sea nearly flooded this old market town, about an hour's train ride east of London.

Faversham straddles a creek on the edge of a vast estuary near the North Sea. And in December, this part of Britain saw one of its highest storm surges in 60 years, leaving several feet of water in Finney’s pub. It came all the way into his dessert kitchen, damaging its old oak floor beams beyond repair.

A needle in a haystack is a metaphor that's been used a lot to describe the challenge of finding Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. On Tuesday, Air Marshal Mark Binskin, Australia's deputy defense chief, told reporters at a military base in Perth that they're still trying to determine where the haystack is.

Meanwhile, planes sat idle behind him, grounded because of bad weather over a wide swath of the Indian Ocean about 1500 miles from Perth.

This story is not about the opening scene from the movie "The Day After Tomorrow," when a giant chunk of Antarctica suddenly slides into the ocean, triggering a global climate catastrophe.

But the fact that the massive West Antarctic ice sheet is starting to collapse is sobering, to say the very least. Two new studies out this week say the collapse may be slow, but it's unstoppable now, and will contribute to rising sea levels.

If you go snorkeling off the coast of Fiji in the south Pacific, you'll run into gorgeous coral reefs full of color, sound and texture. There are big boulder-like corals, branching spiky corals, fish darting around every bend and the crackling sound of reef creatures at work.

“There’s a lot of space for things to hide in and there’s just a huge amount of biodiversity there,” says Danielle Dixson, a coral reef ecologist at Georgia Tech. 

Laura Bassett's own goal won't define her career

Jul 2, 2015
Erich Schlegel/USA TODAY Sports

In soccer, they call an "own goal" a dagger through the heart.

It's when you kick the ball into your own net. And that's exactly what England's Laura Bassett did yesterday.

In the final seconds of the match, with the game tied 1-1, she kicked the ball into her own goal.

It was an accident of course.

But it sent Japan to the final and Bassett to the ground in tears. Cynics call it a quintessential English soccer moment.

Rearranging veggie genes is big business, and we're not even talking about biotechnology. Private companies and university researchers spend hundreds of millions of dollars every year breeding better genetic varieties of food crops.

But organic farmers say those programs have a big blind spot when it comes to figuring out which new varieties are truly better. Few companies or researchers test those varieties under organic conditions.

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