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It's All Politics
5:03 am
Wed November 19, 2014

Sen. Bernie Sanders On How Democrats Lost White Voters

Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent, says "the average person is working longer hours, lower wages, and they do not see any political party standing up and fighting for their rights."
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 11:09 am

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is one of two independents in the Senate. Now, the self-described socialist says he may run for president.

Sanders is aligned with Senate Democrats, but he has spoken lately of a problem with the Democratic coalition that elected President Obama. He says working-class white voters have abandoned Democrats in large numbers. The party, he says, has "not made it clear that they are prepared to stand with the working-class people of this country, take on the big money interests."

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Sweetness And Light
3:49 am
Wed November 19, 2014

Outside Of The Games, Are Sports Corrupt?

The executive committee of FIFA — the international organization that regulates soccer — was so suspected of taking bribes that FIFA ordered its own internal investigation. It's no surprise, says Frank Deford, that it found no wrongdoing.
Kirill Kudryavstev AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 19, 2014 9:03 am

We so regularly excuse the chicanery of sport. We fans suspect that our team is just as guilty as whatever ooze bubbles to the surface elsewhere, so let it go lest we be the next one caught. For us privileged to actually be down in the rabbit hole, the sins have been so present for so long, they simply become accepted as a benign part of the landscape. Hey, it's all just fun and games, so go along, be a — well, be a good sport.

Only, every now and then ...

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The Salt
3:48 am
Wed November 19, 2014

No 'Misteak': High Beef Prices A Boon For Drought-Weary Ranchers

Black Angus cattle in pens outside the sale barn at 44 Farms, a 3,000-acre ranch in Cameron, Texas. The cattle were on display for bidders ahead of 44 Farms' fall auction in October.
Andrew Schneider Houston Public Media

Originally published on Wed November 19, 2014 11:18 am

If you've shopped for meat recently, you no doubt have noticed that beef prices are up. Some grades are even at the highest levels ever recorded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Though the inflated prices may be hard on consumers, they're helping Texas cattle ranchers recover from a fierce drought.

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The Two-Way
6:22 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Senate Rejects Keystone XL Pipeline Bill, In A Close Vote

Pipes for Transcanada Corp.'s planned Keystone XL oil pipeline are stacked at a depot in Gascoyne, N.D. The House of Representatives approved the Keystone XL pipeline Friday; the Senate voted against it on Tuesday.
Andrew Cullen Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 6:52 pm

The controversial Keystone XL pipeline project to expand an oil pipeline running from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico has failed the approval of Congress, after the Senate voted against the project Tuesday. The House passed its version of the bill Friday.

An early tally showed 35 for and 30 against the bill; subsequent calls for senators' votes failed to net the 60 votes needed for passage. The decisive 41st "No" vote came with 55 votes in favor, and the final tally was 59-41.

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Goats and Soda
5:24 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Aid Groups See A Drop-Off In U.S. Health Volunteers To Fight Ebola

Nurses Bridget Mulrooney and Kelly Suter volunteered to work for the International Medical Corps at an Ebola treatment unit in Liberia. IMC is reporting a drop-off in recruits this fall.
Stuart J. Sia International Medical Corps

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 7:01 pm

The federal agency that oversees many American healthcare workers volunteering in Ebola-stricken regions of West Africa says there's been a significant decline in the number of people who are willing to go. International aid groups attribute that drop to the mandatory quarantine rules implemented by New York and New Jersey last month.

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New Boom
5:23 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Amid The Stereotypes, Some Facts About Millennials

Chart: U.S. Estimated Population, By Age
NPR

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 9:33 am

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

"Millennial" is the buzzword of the moment — with much of the national conversation focused on stereotypes and anecdotes. But are young adults today really all that different from those of previous generations?

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The Two-Way
5:22 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

FAA Can Regulate Small Drones: NTSB Reverses Judge's Ruling

A small drone hovers during a meet-up of the D.C. Area Drone User Group on Feb. 1.
Robert MacPherson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 6:09 pm

Overturning a federal judge's ruling that the Federal Aviation Administration had overstepped in fining a man $10,000 for flying a small drone, the National Transportation Safety Board says the agency has the authority to regulate such drones.

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Politics
5:21 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Sen. Landrieu Takes Up Keystone Cause Ahead Of Runoff Election

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 9:31 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
5:19 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Got A Thanksgiving Time Crunch? Food Is Just (A Few) Clicks Away

The Tyler Florence Thanksgiving meal from Williams-Sonoma goes for $399.95.
Courtesy of Williams-Sonoma

Is the Thanksgiving panic setting in? If so, you're not alone. 'Tis the season for many over-worked Americans to fret over how they're going to throw together a huge meal in a limited window of time.

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Around the Nation
5:05 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Who Are The 5 Million Immigrants Covered By Executive Action?

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 6:32 pm

n?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And we just heard Scott refer to as many as 5 million immigrants who could be covered by the president's executive action. There are nearly 12 million unauthorized immigrants in the United States. So who are the 5 million?

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Health Care
5:05 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Americans Think Ebola Is A Top Health Care Problem

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 6:32 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
5:05 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Dangerous Deliveries: Ebola Leaves Moms And Babies Without Care

A pregnant woman waits for help in a cab outside John F. Kennedy hospital in Monrovia, Liberia, in September. Then closed, the hospital's maternity ward reopened in October and is now one of the few places in Monrovia delivering babies.
The Washington Post Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 1:25 pm

For more than two decades, Lucy Barh has been helping women deliver babies. Even during Liberia's violent civil war, when other midwives left, Barh stuck around.

But none of this prepared her for a patient she saw a few months ago.

"I was on duty that day when the patient came in," says Barh, at the headquarters of the Liberian Midwives' Association in Monrovia. "We did the examination. She was not in labor."

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Sports
5:05 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Giancarlo Stanton Earns Record $325 Million Contract With Marlins

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 6:32 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Sports
5:05 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

NFL Suspends Adrian Peterson Without Pay

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 6:32 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
5:02 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Outreach Workers Look For Gains In Second Year Of Obamacare

Lee Ann Johnson, director of the Missoula Indian Center, encourages Native Americans in Montana to enroll in private coverage through Healthcare.gov at an outreach event on Saturday, November 15.
Eric Whitney

Originally published on Wed November 19, 2014 8:42 am

With the HealthCare.gov website working for consumers much more smoothly than last year, health officials are focused on reaching out to potential customers.

For starters, they want to people who bought insurance last year to take another look at those plans. And, of course, the exchange wants to bring in new customers who didn't need or skipped insurance last year.

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Goats and Soda
4:25 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Measles Still Kills 400 Kids A Day — And It May Be Making A Comeback

This month, a doctor gives a measles vaccine to a child in the Yemeni capital of Sanaa.
Mohammed Howais AFP/Getty Images

Measles might be preparing for a comeback tour.

Unlike Ebola, measles easily leaps between people. Virus-filled droplets linger, floating in the air or coating a coffee table for up to two hours after a contagious person coughs or sneezes. If you're susceptible to the disease and you breathe that air or touch a contaminated surface and then rub your eyes, you're screwed. Measles infects 90 percent of those who are not immune.

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Parallels
4:00 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

With Cash And Cachet, The Islamic State Expands Its Empire

The Islamic Youth Council in Derna, in eastern Libya, is among the local militant groups from Egypt to Libya that have reportedly pledged allegiance to the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 8:02 pm

Islamist militant groups from the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt to the coast of eastern Libya are pledging allegiance to the so-called Islamic State, or ISIS.

The Sunni extremist group primarily operates in the chaos of Iraq and Syria but is using chameleon-like branding and the draw of cash to get militants who focused on local issues to join their brutal empire.

In an audio recording posted online last week, the head of the self-declared Islamic State, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, announced that his group is going global.

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All Tech Considered
3:35 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

How A Feud Between Two Russian Companies Fueled A 'Spam Nation'

Don't install software from the Web unless it's directly from the company that made it. If you do install software, make sure you update it. And whatever you do, don't open attachments emailed to you by spammers.

These are just a few warnings from Brian Krebs, an investigative journalist and cybersecurity expert.

Krebs learned the ins and outs of how the spam industry works when he was given documents in the aftermath of a feud between two Russian companies — two of the largest sponsors of pharmaceutical spam.

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Author Interviews
3:35 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Norman Lear Looks Back On His Long Life In 'Even This I Get To Experience'

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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World Cafe
3:18 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

'Heathens From The Bayous': Cajun And Creole Culture In Lafayette

Michael Doucet.
John Vettese XPN

On today's installment of World Cafe's Sense Of Place visit to Lafayette, La., we speak with Michael Doucet, who plays Cajun, Creole, zydeco and other traditional music as a founding member and fiddler of Lafayette band BeauSoleil.

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NPR Story
2:59 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Cholesterol Drug Vytorin Found To Lower Heart Risk

A new study finds the drug Vytorin helps lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. (Schering-Plough via Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 3:57 pm

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Statins have long been the drug of of choice to lower cholesterol to reduce the rise of heart attacks and strokes.

But a new study — funded by Merck — finds that the drug Vytorin, which combines the statin Zocor with the drug Zetia, is more effective than statins alone at lowering cholesterol and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients who have had a heart attack or severe chest pain.

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NPR Story
2:59 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Record-Breaking Cold Sweeps The U.S.

A commuter walks along Market Street in freezing temperatures Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014, in Philadelphia. The National Weather Service says parts of northwestern Pennsylvania are bracing for nearly 2 feet of snow as arctic air continues to produce lake-effect conditions. A lake-effect snow warning remains in effect for northwest Pennsylvania, northeast Ohio and parts of western New York through 7 a.m. Wednesday. (Matt Rourke/AP)

We know Buffalo, New York is no stranger to snow, but the season’s first big snowfall was a whopper and is being measured in feet, instead of inches. Nearly 3 feet of snow blanketed the Buffalo area, closing major highways and shutting schools.

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NPR Story
2:59 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Outspoken Olympic Runner Nick Symmonds Pens Memoir

Nick Symmonds of the United States celebrates winning silver in the Men's 800 metres final during Day Four of the 14th IAAF World Athletics Championships Moscow 2013 at Luzhniki Stadium on August 13, 2013 in Moscow, Russia. (Mark Kolbe/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 4:04 pm

Nick Symmonds has won his share of races, but he often gets as much attention for what he does off the track.

Symmonds is a two-time Olympian, a World Championship medalist and a multi-title winner in college, but he rubs some people the wrong way because he rails against the organizations that govern track and field and he speaks out on issues such as gun control.

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Indonesia Urged To Stop 'Virginity Tests' For Female Police Recruits

Only some of these officers, seen in Banda Aceh, Indonesia, on Jan. 13, are exempt from a "virginity test." Human Rights Watch wants Indonesia to scrap the practice for its female police recruits.
Hotli Simanjuntak EPA /LANDOV

A human rights group is calling on Indonesia to scrap "virginity tests" given to female police recruits.

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Shots - Health News
1:51 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

More States Adopt Laws To Ease Access To Experimental Treatments

When should a patient in dire condition be allowed to try an experimental treatment?
BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 19, 2014 12:00 pm

On Election Day, Arizona voters approved a referendum that allows terminally ill patients to receive treatment with drugs and devices that haven't been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Arizona became the fifth state to approve a so-called right-to-try law this year.

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The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Baby, It's Cold Outside: All 50 States Hit 32 Degrees

A commuter walks along Market Street in freezing temperatures on Tuesday in Philadelphia.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 1:46 pm

You probably noticed: It's really cold outside. But it's not just you.

According to the National Weather Service and meteorologist Eric Holthaus, all 50 states hit 32 degrees or lower on Tuesday.

Yep. Even Hawaii, where Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano reaching 13,800 feet above sea level, was below freezing.

This map from the National Weather Service's Twin Cities office shows you that:

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Code Switch
12:19 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

The Many Stories Behind Double-Eyelid Surgery

Double eyelids, single eyelids — ” why do we change our eyes, or keep them the way they are?
Claire O'Neill/NPR

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 2:10 pm

This is the second half of a look at the history and motivations behind the Asian blepharoplasty, popularly known as "double-eyelid surgery." On Monday, we dug into its background and some of its history. Today, we'll explore the "why."

A lot of assumptions are made about why people undergo double-eyelid surgery. Assumptions like: They wanted to look more white, or they wanted to look less Asian.

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Parallels
12:12 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

Once Tolerated, Westerners Are Now Targeted By Radical Islamists

Islamic State fighters march in Raqqa, Syria. The group has killed five Western hostages in recent months. In the 1990s, many radical Islamist groups gave interviews to journalists and refrained from kidnapping Westerners.
AP

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 2:43 pm

The Islamic State isn't the first Middle East extremist group to make a gruesome spectacle of kidnapping and killing Westerners. The first wave came in the 1980s, when Hezbollah in Lebanon seized dozens of Westerners amid an anarchic civil war.

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The Salt
12:04 pm
Tue November 18, 2014

As Espresso Rises, Will 'Greek Coffee' Be Left To The Turks?

"Greek coffee" may be a matter of national pride in the Mediterranean nation. But increasingly, Greeks are embracing espresso, an imported brew, as their cup of Joe of choice.
Pawel Loj Flickr

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 1:08 pm

Greeks have loved coffee for centuries. Today, they drink more per capita than even the French and Italians, and almost as much as Americans, and they may spend hours each week in cafes.

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It's All Politics
11:51 am
Tue November 18, 2014

How Many Louisiana Jobs Are Actually At Stake In Keystone Debate?

The State Department's Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement on the Keystone XL pipeline defines a job as lasting for only one year.
United States Department of State

With the Louisiana Senate runoff driving votes in both chambers of Congress on the Keystone XL pipeline, here's a question: How many of those jobs will actually be in Louisiana?

The answer: zero.

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