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What's Next For The Dakota Pipeline?

Dec 6, 2016
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The Book Concierge is back and bigger than ever! Explore more than 300 standout titles picked by NPR staff and critics.

Open the app now!

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Trump vs. Boeing and the real cost of Air Force One

Dec 6, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Andrea Seabrook

Donald Trump says the U.S. is paying too much for its Air Force One program. Kai and Andrea talk with Gregory Sanders of the Center for Strategic and International Studies about what makes Air Force One so expensive and what Trump's tweets may tell us about his views on defense spending. 

On today's show, we'll talk about Trump's call for the government to cancel a Boeing contract for a new Air Force One plane; division among Republicans over Trump's 35 percent tariff plan; and the future of trade between Mexico and the U.S. 

Sarah Lohman has made everything from colonial-era cocktails to cakes with black pepper to stewed moose face. She is a historical gastronomist, which means she re-creates historical recipes to connect with the past.

Ground control to Buzz Aldrin!

The Apollo 11 astronaut is reportedly recovering well in a New Zealand hospital, after being evacuated with medical problems from Antarctica last week.

And he's being helped by none other than Dr. David Bowie. Not the late pop star David Bowie, whose 1969 Space Oddity song was released just days before Aldrin walked on the moon.

His doctor is named David Bowie. Aldrin's manager posted a photo of the the astronaut and his doctor on Twitter, noting, you can't make this stuff up.

Before he went to prison, Ernest killed his 2-year-old daughter in the grip of a psychotic delusion. When the Indiana Department of Correction released him in 2015, he was terrified something awful might happen again.

He had to see a doctor. He had only a month's worth of pills to control his delusions and mania. He was desperate for insurance coverage.

As an Asian-American woman, I've had any number of opportunities to see someone who looked like me on the big and small screen.

Since I was a little girl, I've seen Disney's Mulan, Trini Kwan from Fox Kids' Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, and Dr. Cristina Yang on Grey's Anatomy, to name a few. And while the portrayal of Asian-American women by Hollywood and television could use some work – too often they're over-sexualized or rendered exotic – at least we're present and have some depth.

The revelation of a phone call between President-elect Donald Trump and Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen last Friday startled leaders and diplomats in Washington, Beijing and beyond. In her first comments on the call, Tsai sought to dampen those fears.

"Of course I have to stress that one phone call does not mean a policy shift," Tsai said on Tuesday in a small meeting with American journalists in Taipei. "The phone call was a way for us to express our respect for the U.S. election as well as congratulate President-elect Trump on his win."

We live in a world of screens. And in this digital age — with so many devices and distraction — it's one of the things parents worry about most: How much time should their kids spend staring at their phones and computers? What's the right balance between privacy and self-discovery?

NPR's annual Book Concierge is back. And to mark the occasion, correspondent Lynn Neary joins Morning Edition's Rachel Martin to talk about the year in fiction — and to share a couple of her favorite titles from 2016.

If you're looking for the books mentioned on-air, here are links to:

Seventy-five years after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, some Americans have never stopped believing that President Franklin Roosevelt let it happen in order to draw the U.S. into World War II.

"It's ridiculous," says Rob Citino, a senior researcher at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. "But it's evergreen. It never stops. My students, over 30 years — there'd always be someone in class [who'd say], 'Roosevelt knew all about it.'"

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D Gorenstein

A measure to fund billions of dollars in medical aid and research moves to the Senate this week, after flying through the House last week. It pours billions of dollars into the so-called “Cancer Moonshot,” funding to combat the opioid addiction crisis, and many other areas of critical biomedical research.

And while it is enjoying a rare moment of broad bipartisan support, some critics warn that parts of the bill give pharmaceutical and medical device companies a sweetheart deal. 

Trump's stance on tariffs divides Republicans

Dec 6, 2016
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Andy Uhler

Donald Trump promised big changes in America's trade policy, and as president-elect he's busy tweeting about it. Over the weekend, he warned that companies that move production out of the United States could face a 35 percent fine on things they sell here. But now some Republican leaders are suggesting they might not be on board with this approach. It represents a distinct split within the Republican party. Representative Kevin McCarthy, a Republican from California, reacted to Trump's tweet by telling reporters he "didn't want to get into some kind of trade war."

Mexico ponders the future of trade with the U.S.

Dec 6, 2016
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Lorne Matalon

Mexicans are anxious about the future of  the North American Free Trade Act, and how the incoming administration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump may seek to change or even withdraw from the agreement.

Mexican officials are now speaking with Asian nations about how trade between Mexico and Asia might change in a post-NAFTA era.

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Adam Allington

The web retailer Amazon has just launched something sure to draw the attention of shoppers — a cashier-free grocery store.

It’s called “Amazon Go,” and the big idea is that shoppers can just grab the items they want and leave. Kind of like Uber for grocery shopping. Analysts believe the concept has the potential to change the face of retail.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll discuss how the Republican leadership feels about Trump's proposal for a 35 percent tariff; the president-elect's relationship with corporate America; and news that Lego's CEO has decided to step down. 

Traffic safety officials regularly warn us of the risks of driving while drunk or distracted.

But Americans still need to wake up to the dangers of getting behind the wheel when sleepy, according to a recent study of crash rates.

A report released Tuesday by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety suggests that drivers who sleep only five or six hours in a 24-hour period are twice as likely to crash as drivers who get seven hours of sleep or more.

It may sound like the plot of a movie: police find a young man dead with stab wounds. Tests quickly show he'd had Ebola.

Officials realize the suspects in the case, men in a local gang, may have picked up and spread Ebola across the slum. These men are reluctant to quarantine themselves and some – including a man nicknamed "Time Bomb" – cannot even be found.

This scenario actually unfolded in the West African nation of Liberia in 2015. And what followed was a truly unconventional effort by epidemiologists to stop a new Ebola outbreak.

Marketplace Tech for Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Dec 6, 2016
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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about Amazon's new cashier-free grocery store; Uber's purchase of Geometric Intelligence, a company with a multidisciplinary approach to artificial intelligence; and the European Commission's reminder to companies like Facebook and Twitter that they agreed to curb hate speech on their platforms.

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Leonhard Foege/Reuters

You could be forgiven for thinking Europe is coming undone these days.

First there was Brexit, when British voters chose to leave the European Union. And there's been the rise of parties opposed to European integration in several countries including France, the Netherlands and Germany.

This past weekend, voters in Italy rejected changes in their constitution, turning against their pro-EU leader Prime Minister Matteo Renzi. He has announced his resignation.

Guess which city has the strictest Airbnb laws

Dec 5, 2016
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Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters 

There's a showdown in Europe that involves housing.

Simply put: There's a shortage of affordable places to live. Especially places to rent.

Residents put some of the blame for that on home-sharing websites like Airbnb. They say these sites allow landlords to fill their apartments with lucrative short-term rentals instead of more affordable long-term ones.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Since her son Tommy went to jail, Dawn Herbert has been trying to see him as much as she can. He's incarcerated less than a 10-minute drive from her house in Keene, N.H. But he might as well be a lot farther.

"He's in that building and I can't get to him," Herbert says.

Dawn's visits probably don't look like what one might picture, where she's sitting across a table, or behind a pane of Plexiglas looking at and talking to her son.

Italian archaeologists discovered the plundered tomb of Queen Nefertari in Egypt's Valley of the Queens in 1904, and amid the debris, they found a pair of mummified knees.

Now, for the first time, researchers have conducted a broad array of tests on the knees and say they are confident they belong to Nefertari, who was the wife of Pharaoh Ramses II and one of the most famous of Egypt's queens.

More and more of the things we use every day are being connected to the Internet.

The term for these Internet-enabled devices — like connected cars and home appliances — is the Internet of things. They promise to make life more convenient, but these devices are also vulnerable to hacking.

Security technologist Bruce Schneier told NPR's Audie Cornish that while hacking someone's emails or banking information can be embarrassing or costly, hacking the Internet of things could be dangerous.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Eleven Americans describe what it's like to be transgender in Timothy Greenfield-Sanders' new HBO documentary, The Trans List. Though the individuals in the film come from varied backgrounds, there is at least one common thread to their experiences: "We all come out publicly," lawyer Kylar Broadus tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "There is no hidden way to come out as a trans person."

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