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A flood of migrants, including refugees from Syria and Afghanistan, were stranded in Budapest after the Hungarian government closed down the city's main train terminal.

Authorities had been allowing migrants to travel to Western Europe without checking passports, but on Tuesday, the station was closed and migrants began protesting.

We All Scream For Slower Melting Ice Cream

Sep 1, 2015
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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Here's a test of just how President Obama can take an issue when majorities in Congress differ with it.

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The issue is climate change, and the president's view, no long-term issue is more vital to address.

In less than 24 hours, Valerie Davidson has 50 people coming to her house for dinner.

She had planned to catch and cook enough salmon for the main course. But early in the morning, Alaska opened the Kuskokwim River to commercial fishing, which means subsistence fishermen like her can't fish on it.

So Davidson and I are in her bright orange 1983 Chevy pickup stalking the "free fish" container where state biologists deposit their test catches after conducting studies after each high tide.

So if you add up all the college costs that students and parents probably didn't plan for — the stuff that isn't tuition and room and board — how big is that number? The National Retail Federation estimates that, this year, it will total $43 billion. That's a hard number to grasp, so let's break it down to one family — mine.

With our daughter now beginning her fourth and hopefully final year in college, here's one thing I've learned: No matter how much you plan to spend, it won't cover everything. Not even close.

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The greater sage grouse is a peculiar and distinctly Western bird. It's about the size of a chicken and about as adaptable as the dodo bird, which is to say it's not very adaptable at all — at least not in a human-driven time scale.

In biological terms, the greater sage grouse is perfectly adapted for its habitat: the rolling hills of knee-high silver scrub that's sometimes called the sagebrush sea. It's the oft-forgotten parts of the fast-changing West — The Big Empty, as settlers used to call it.

This has been a banner year for employees seeking greater paid parental leave.

The title tells all: Sisters in Law: How Sandra Day O'Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Went to the Supreme Court and Changed the World. Author Linda Hirshman's joint biography of the first and second women to serve on the nation's highest court is a gossipy, funny, sometimes infuriating and moving tale of two women so similar and yet so different.

Sandra Day O'Connor, raised on a Western ranch and a lifelong Republican who cut her political teeth as majority leader of the Arizona Senate, was named to the Supreme Court by President Reagan in 1981.

Stories about how Amazon and Google want to deliver packages using drones have gotten a lot of attention. But in fact, some 1,300 businesses and individuals have already received permission from the Federal Aviation Administration to use drones for commercial purposes — everything from selling real estate to inspecting utility lines. But their operators are worried that recreational drone users who have been flying their vehicles near aircraft may spoil the party.

The viruses that cause the common cold are always lurking. But consider this: Even if we touch a doorknob or keyboard that's covered in cold germs from an infected person, we don't always catch the cold.

"Sometimes when we're exposed to viruses, we end up not getting sick," says Aric Prather, a psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco, who studies how our behaviors can influence our health.

PODCAST: Consumers love coupons

Sep 1, 2015
Noel King

On today's show, competition for the arctic heats up; medical debt collectors are up in arms over a new ruling by the FCC; and how habits adopted by consumers in the midst of recession are hard to shake.

Medical debt collectors up in arms over FCC ruling

Sep 1, 2015
D Gorenstein

Twenty-seven million Americans were contacted by a collection agency about unpaid medical bills last year.

A new Federal Communications Commission ruling makes it more difficult to track down those debtors on their cell phones, according to the collection industry. 

The new rule clarifies that collection agencies can "robo-call" someone on a cell, but only if that person consented to those calls for billing issues.

Airing on Tuesday, September 1, 2015: On today's show, global markets react as China's manufacturing contracts; why medical debt collectors are up in arms over a recent FCC ruling; and the tricks of the trade of luxury real estate brokers.

Stop thinking Netflix is a movie service

Sep 1, 2015
Gigi Douban

Netflix says it's giving up its partnership with the cable network Epix. So by the end of this month, if you want to watch "Hunger Games: Catching Fire," you'll have to go to Hulu, Epix's new partner. Netflix is focusing on original content for its 65 million members. Is Hulu's gain Netflix's loss?

Marketplace Tech for Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Sep 1, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Tuesday, September 1, 2015: On today's show, we'll have more on Apple's partnership with Cisco; Netflix's decision to let go of some big name movies; and potential U.S. sanctions against China for cyber spying/theft.

The recession changed how we shop

Sep 1, 2015
Mark Garrison

Susan Samtur’s bargain-hunting ability made her famous because of shopping trips like a recent one to Walgreens, where she sliced a $19.08 bill nearly in half at checkout by applying in-store savings and multiple coupons. To top it off, she had points on a loyalty card, which brought her out-of-pocket payment down to mere pennies.

“It cost us 68 cents. What do you think about that?” she beams.

iOriginal iProgramming

Sep 1, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

$200 billion

That's about how much cash (likely more) is at Tim Cook's disposal for spending at Apple. And according to new reports, one focus of expansion for the company will be original programming. As Variety reports, Apple has come under some criticism for allowing Netflix and other streaming services to completely dominate this corner of the market. 

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Terry Loewen, who pleaded guilty to attempting to drive an explosives-laden vehicle and detonate it at an airport in Wichita, Kan., has been sentenced to 20 years in federal prison. Loewen, an avionics technician, had an employee access card at the airport.

Loewen was arrested in 2013; investigators said he spent months planning his attack, discussing his work with what he thought was a group of conspirators — but was actually a team of undercover FBI agents.

From member station KMUW in Wichita, Abigail Wilson reports:

The latest batch of Hillary Clinton's emails from her time as secretary of state contains 125 the government now considers "confidential," the State Department said.

"We stand by our contention that the information we've upgraded was not marked 'classified' at the time the emails were sent," State Department spokesman Mark Toner said Monday in a press briefing.

Texas has a barbecue joint known as much for the line of people waiting outside as for its tender brisket.

At Franklin Barbecue in Austin, people start lining up around 5 a.m., waiting six hours, chatting with others in line until the restaurant opens at 11 a.m.

This barbecue place is such a big deal that entrepreneurs like Desmond Roldan are cashing in on its fans.

"People know me. I'm a big deal," he says, chuckling.

Foreign Buyers Scoop Up Abandoned Spanish Villages

Aug 31, 2015
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The ride-hailing service Uber has served more than 1 million customers in Philadelphia, despite operating under disputed terms for nearly a year. Now the city's regulators are taking the company to court.

Uber says it doesn't plan to stop operating in the city where it first launched service last October.

If, like me, you're an amateur taster of beer and wine, inevitably you've asked yourself why you don't taste that hint of raspberry or note of pine bark that someone else says is there.

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