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A prominent Muslim leader in Nigeria is making a point about a common practice in Islam. He says if people are worried about poverty or terrorism, they should consider how those problems can be made worse by polygamy. Here's NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton.

Interscope Geffen A&M CEO says industry has got to figure out streaming

Feb 22, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

When John Janick was an undergrad, he started a record company out of his dorm room called Fueled by Ramen. It went on to represent artists like Jimmy Eat World and Fall Out Boy, then later Panic! at the Disco, fun. and Paramore. Now he runs a considerably bigger company as the CEO of Interscope Geffen A&M Records. Janick was hand-picked by Jimmy Iovine to be the music industry legend's successor.

Riptide, Ore., is a place to get lost in — not that you'd necessarily want to. It's 1983, and the sleepy coastal town is starting to get weird: Mutilated animals are turning up on the beach at Wolf Point, and the discovery of the skeleton of a Native American girl from over a century ago sparks something even stranger. Some kind of supernatural force appears to be on a rampage in Riptide, although its residents have plenty of man-made horrors to be concerned about as well. A recent, fatal car accident has cast a pall of tragedy over the town.

Koshary is to Egyptian cuisine as the pyramids are to its culture. Emblematic. Iconic. Beloved.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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UNIDENTIFIED SINGER: (Singing in foreign language).

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2/22/2017: Let's talk about coal, again

Feb 22, 2017
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Marketplace

We’ve been hearing a lot about coal lately. Coal mining country came out strong for Trump, who has been promising to bring back mining jobs. We discuss the reality of the boom-and-bust industry with residents in one Illinois town who wonder if they’d be better off without it. From the latest installment of Corner Office, we’ll hear the unlikely story of how the “La La Land” soundtrack came to be from the man who made it happen: John Janick, CEO of Interscope Geffen A&M Records. Plus, how closely are you being watched at work?

Fake news has been, well, in the news a lot lately. But for the world's largest crowdsourced encyclopedia, it's nothing new.

"Wikipedia has been dealing with fake news since it started 16 years ago," notes LiAnna Davis, deputy director of the Wiki Education Foundation.

02/22/17: Watching $100 million go down the drain

Feb 22, 2017

We're exploring the financial turmoil that ABB, a Swiss engineering group, is currently facing. The company may lose $100 million because of a criminal scheme at a South Korean subsidiary. Next, we'll talk about a turnaround for U.S. coal mining companies and then take a closer look at one small California community where arsenic is contaminating its groundwater. 

Treating people for free or for very little money has been the role of community health centers across the U.S. for decades. In 2015, 1 in 12 Americans sought care at one of these clinics; nearly 6 in 10 were women, and hundreds of thousands were veterans.

In North Dakota, authorities set Wednesday as the deadline for the dwindling number of protesters against the Dakota Access pipeline to clean up and go home.

At the main protest camp, a massive cleanup effort has been underway. Semi trucks have been hauling debris out of camp and people here are piling garbage into bags.

"It looks like a trash pile. But it's getting picked up and every spot is starting to look better and better as we work together," Dotty Agard of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe says as she sorts through abandoned goods.

For Michael Childers, ice makes getting around a little easier.

When it's thick enough, the ice on Lake Superior creates a makeshift road between Bayfield, Wis., and Madeline Island, the small resort island where Childers and about 250 others live year-round.

But for the second year in a row, warmer winters have made it necessary for the ferries that usually don't operate during winter to continue to run.

It's a chilly midmorning in a clinic in the working-class neighborhood of Sweileh in Amman, Jordan. Children wearing winter coats donated by charity organizations sit on plastic chairs, waiting to see doctors and dentists.

Pamphlets in the clinic, published by the Muslim Brotherhood, offer advice on being a good Muslim and instruction on how to pray. But it's not really religion that brings people here.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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All right. The NBA returns to work on Thursday after this past weekend's All-Star game - the traditional mid-season break for Pro Basketball. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman hardly ever takes a break. And he's back with us. Hi, Tom.

Dangerous passage: Refugees in Minnesota risk death to reach Canada

Feb 22, 2017
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Dan Gunderson and Laura Yuen

This story was first published on MPRnews.org 

Bashir Yussuf had survived Somalia's violence, fled to South America, then struggled through dense Panamanian jungle to make it north and seek asylum.

Now he stood freezing in waist-high snow in the desolate Minnesota-Canadian borderlands, wondering if these last few miles of his journey might be the ones that finally killed him.

Mining companies bounce back after years of losses

Feb 22, 2017

Some of the world’s biggest mines are reporting profits again after a rocky few years. Commodity prices are up, and mining companies are leaner. They’ve sold off underperforming mines, and paid off debt. Miners and steel makers are also hoping President Trump will give them a boost with new spending on infrastructure in the U.S. But they’re also hoping he doesn’t start any trade wars, because they rely on global trade. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Why it might be a good thing if your boss is an introvert

Feb 22, 2017
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David Brancaccio

Turns out that the most effective leader isn't necessarily the one who's the most outgoing, the most outspoken, the most assertive. 

Adam Grant, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, conducted a study at a national pizza chain with his colleagues to discover the connection between personality type and management style. They found that an introvert's or extrovert's success depended on conditions like how active or passive their employees were. 

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Scott Cohn

The crisis in Flint, Michigan, drew national attention to the issue of safe drinking water. The Trump administration has offered few specifics on what it plans to do about it. But Flint is just one example. Other communities are tackling water problems too, like Kettleman City, California, which has been dealing with unsafe drinking water for years.

Six Flags reports its quarterly earnings today. It's one of the top five players in the amusement park industry, Disney being the biggest. The company is starting to hold job fairs for its busy summer season, but in today's tightening labor market, hospitality companies could have trouble getting the workers they need.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

A new 3-D pen lets kids create their own toys

Feb 22, 2017
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Bruce Johnson and Danielle Stephens

When you think of the term "3-D," you may think of glasses. Maxwell Bogue thinks of a pen. 

Bogue is the CEO and co-founder of WobbleWorks Inc., a company that created the 3Doodler Start Pen, which allows children to draw pictures that turn into 3-D sculptures when they're finished. The pen uses specially developed bio-plastic material at a much lower temperature than 3-D pens for adults, making it safer for children to use.

Nation’s mayors hold 'day of action' on ACA

Feb 22, 2017
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Amy Scott

Mayors around the country are holding what they’re calling a “day of action” Wednesday to warn of the risks to their cities if Congress repeals the Affordable Care Act without an effective replacement. More than 50 mayors are hosting town halls and other events pressing lawmakers to preserve key parts of the law, which has helped reduce the country’s uninsured rate to a record low.

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Marketplace

Mayors around the country plan to warn their cities about what will happen if the Affordable Care Act is repealed. We'll explore the financial consequences of a potential end to Obamacare, and then look at why amusement parks may have a harder time hiring workers this year. Plus: A look at the connection that exists between personality type and management style. 

02/22/17: What does the future of Uber look like?

Feb 22, 2017
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Marketplace

A former Uber employee has written a blog post about being the target of sexual harassment and sexism at the company. Jessi Hempel, head of editorial at Backchannel, joined us to discuss how she thinks CEO Travis Kalanick should have handled the issue. Next, we'll discuss some of the products we discovered at Toy Fair 2017, which included a children's 3-D pen that'll let you create sculptures.

When you think of an old map or manuscript, you might picture something yellowed, tattered or even torn because of how long it has been around. But millions of historic documents, from presidential papers to personal slave journals, are facing an issue apart from age: a preservation method that has backfired.

In a cold, white room on the first floor of South Carolina's state archives, a dehumidifier keeps a mass of old documents safe.

The Polish-born conductor and composer Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, who led the Minnesota Orchestra for nearly two decades and worked with that symphony for well over 50 years in total, died Tuesday at age 93.

Thaer al-Tahli has spent three years trying to make it to the United States. He's finally giving up the dream.

Al-Tahli is a familiar face in Amman, Jordan. He's a television news anchor and a Syrian in exile. The 29-year-old supported the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad. As an activist, he organized demonstrations and set up a student union at his university in Homs.

That didn't please the Syrian regime.

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