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The rise of Paramount Pictures and anti-trust regulation

Oct 24, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about anti-trust concerns surrounding the AT&T-Time Warner merger, along with similarities between the deal and the rise of Paramount Pictures. Plus, we'll look at the price increases for presidential TV ads in swing states. 

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For Ross Roberts, it was a lack of resources that drove him from the classroom. For Danielle Painton, it was too much emphasis on testing. For Sergio Gonzalez, it was a nasty political environment.

Welcome to the U.S. teaching force, where the "I'm outta here" rate is an estimated 8 percent a year — twice that of high-performing countries like Finland or Singapore. And that 8 percent is a lot higher than other professions.

When scientists recently announced that they had discovered a new planet orbiting our closest stellar neighbor, Proxima Centuri, they also released an artist's conception of the planet.

The picture of a craggy canyon, illuminated by a reddish-orange sunset, looked like an image that could have been taken on Mars by one of NASA's rovers. But the alien scene was actually completely made-up.

A drive 30 minutes north of Omaha, Neb., leads to the Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant. It's full of new equipment. There's a white concrete box building that's still under construction. It's licensed until 2033. But the plant is closing Monday.

Nuclear power is expensive, especially when compared to some of the alternatives, so the U.S. nuclear power industry is shrinking. As more plants go offline, industry leaders are forced to reckon with what critics call a "broken system" for taking plants out of service and storing radioactive waste.

Jeffrey Goldberg, The Atlantic's new editor, has had a long career as a reporter, covering Israel, Pakistan and Iran, and spending hours interviewing President Obama.

And recently, Goldberg pressed for his magazine to endorse Hillary Clinton for president. He said it was right, even though it's only the third time in its history The Atlantic has endorsed a presidential candidate.

At the Marshfield Clinic dental center in Chippewa Falls, Wis., hygienist Karen Aslinger is getting her room ready. It's all quite routine — covering the chair's headrest with plastic, opening instruments, wiping down trays.

But then she starts getting creative.

David Brancaccio

It became official over the weekend: AT&T wants to buy Time Warner for $85.4 billion. Time Warner's properties include Warner Bros. movie studio, HBO, CNN and DC Comics, among others. 

The deal between AT&T (a company that distributes content) and Time Warner (a company that makes content) echoes a trend already underway in the industry.

Will Visa’s recent PayPal partnership stoke its earnings?

Oct 24, 2016
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Visa reports earnings Monday, and we'll see results for the first full quarter of its partnership with PayPal. Previously, PayPal actively steered its users away from using Visa to avoid the fees Visa charged on every purchase. Now Visa is getting those fees, and something more strategically important — an entry to the booming, and millennial-friendly, mobile payment space.

Political ad spending hikes prices, cuts inventory

Oct 24, 2016
Gigi Douban

Chances are good, especially if you live in a swing state, that you’re being bombarded by political ads. Between mid-September and mid-October alone, 117,000 presidential ads aired on television, according to the Wesleyan Media Project. This political ad-buying frenzy makes it a tough market for those who want to buy ad space. Prices have gone up substantially these past few weeks and there isn't much inventory out there. So some businesses are holding off on advertising until after the election, while others are turning to more affordable digital options.

Marketplace Tech for Monday, October 24, 2016

Oct 24, 2016

On today's show, we'll look at how Americans feel about voting online; a Politico report that predicted the media could be vulnerable to cyber attacks on election night; and a new study that shows the share of women in tech is declining. 

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It's no secret that this presidential campaign season has been tense, with disagreement and rancor even louder than usual.


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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Your reaction to the following words will probably determine whether this book is for you. If your heart speeds up and you find yourself making grabby hands at the screen, maybe hopping in your chair muttering, "Give it to me now," I'm happy to tell you this book is available and worth your time to read once, possibly twice.

Here are the words in question: "Gender-flipped Sherlock Holmes."

Saed Karzoun read self-help books like Think and Grow Rich. He carefully studied the YouTube videos of motivational speakers like Les Brown.

All of it helped Karzoun style himself as a motivational speaker hoping to inspire his fellow Palestinians.

There isn't much optimism in the Palestinian territories these days. Unemployment is high. Morale is low. The peace process is frozen. Foreign aid to the Palestinians has dropped drastically in recent years. An independent Palestinian state is nowhere on the horizon.

In most cases, when an employer pays a signing bonus to attract new workers, that payment is understood to be essentially unrecoverable. But the Pentagon has a different understanding — and it's ordering the California National Guard to claw back thousands of dollars paid to soldiers who reenlisted to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan.

A tour bus and tractor-trailer collided outside of Palm Springs, Calif., early on Sunday morning, injuring dozens of people and killing at least 13 passengers.

At a press conference on Sunday afternoon, the chief of the local California Highway Patrol division said the bus collided into the back of the truck so forcefully that it traveled some 15 feet into the truck's trailer.

Donald Trump's slogan "Make America Great Again" is an easy one to adapt for whatever your cause. There are ones like "Make America Gay Again," "Make America Skate Again," "Make America Read Again," "Make America Fair Again." You get the idea.

Bakers, of course, had to get in on the action. How could you pass up "Make America Cake Again"?

Astronauts used the International Space Station's robotic arm to grapple the Cygnus cargo spacecraft early Sunday morning, starting the process of bringing more than 5,100 pounds of supplies and research equipment aboard. The cargo's experiments include one thing astronauts normally avoid: fire.

"The new experiments include studies on fire in space, the effect of lighting on sleep and daily rhythms, collection of health-related data, and a new way to measure neutrons," NASA says.

Lalin St. Juste, leader of the seven-piece, genre-bending band The Seshen, wrote the song "Distant Heart" in memory of a friend.

"She struggled with a lot of darkness and addiction and trauma and things like that," she says. "And over the course of our relationship, I watched her struggle to be resilient with it."

Moshe the cat lives in an old brick house in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Washington, D.C. His owner, Cassandra Slack, moved in a little more than a year ago.

The first floor feels open and airy. Large windows bring a flood of light inside, making the original hardwood floors shine.

But downstairs, in the basement where Slack lives, the atmosphere is different. The floor is carpeted, the lights are dim, and the ceiling is low.

Slack had an eerie experience down here when she first moved in.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

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