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At Pride events in New York City this weekend, the emotional excitement about marriage equality was evident. But many people also were thrilled about the practical considerations.

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"It was Greek to me."

Shakespeare used that phrase in one of his tragedies to suggest that a complicated matter was beyond understanding.

Many Americans may be muttering those words again as this week's Greek tragedy plays out.

The situation in Athens really is complicated, but it's also important. So let's walk through the basics together, and then consider what it might mean to Americans.

Here's what has happened so far:

-- The Greek government has way too much debt and can't pay its creditors.

Bitcoin wants to be the answer to Greece's prayers

Jun 29, 2015
Stefanos Rapanis/Reuters

The Bitcoin community is having an "I told you so" moment.

The value of the virtual currency has been on the rise this past month amid the growing panic about Greek’s financial future. Across the country, banks are shuttered and capital controls are in place until the referendum on Sunday. By Saturday, a rush emptied as many as 500 ATMs, Bloomberg reported

There are a number of dramatic economic stories in the news today. In Greece, banks and markets are closed, as the country edges towards a default and or exit from the eurozone.

Meanwhile, Puerto Rico’s governor now says that the commonwealth cannot pay its $72 billion in debts. And in China, stocks have tumbled into a bear market, despite a move by the central bank there to cut interest rates to a record low.

President Obama won a series of huge victories in the Supreme Court last week, including health care and same sex marriage. And officials in South Carolina called for the removal of the Confederate flag from the state capitol grounds after nine African Americans were gunned down in a Charleston church. Here & Now’s Robin Young asks historian Julian Zelizer to put the week into historical context.

Our electricity system is changing rapidly around us. New sources of renewable power are meeting technologies that can crunch unprecedented amounts of data. It’s all leading to a major shakeup for how utilities do business. Dan Boyce from Here & Now’s contributor Inside Energy takes us to Fort Collins, Colorado, for a peek into our utility’s possible future.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Supreme Court has placed a stay on a lower court's ruling that upheld new abortion standards in Texas, to give opponents of a controversial 2013 law time to take their case to the nation's highest court.

The stay is temporary: If the Supreme Court refuses to hear the case, the stay will be lifted and the law will take effect. If the justices agree to hear the case, the stay would remain in effect until a ruling is issued.

The next time you dab wasabi on your sushi or spread mustard on your hot dog, take a moment to thank a caterpillar. It may sound unlikely, but the critters play a critical role in creating the sharp, pungent flavors that give those condiments a savory kick.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

NBCUniversal is ending its business relationship with Donald Trump following comments Trump made about Mexican immigrants. Trump's controversial remarks came as he was announcing his bid for the Republican Party's presidential nomination.

NBC said in a statement that:

The Supreme Court ruled last week that states cannot keep same-sex couples from marrying and must recognize their unions. The historic decision was welcomed by many, but there was much criticism, too, especially in some conservative states.

It's T minus four days until exam day, and Travis Driscoll is practically living at his desk.

"Each day, I'm easily here for five hours," he says. "I haven't done much of anything else but studying for the last two months."

Driscoll is one of 13,000 medical school applicants across the U.S. taking the new Medical College Admissions Test, or MCAT. He's got stacks of science books on his desk to help him prepare and a rainbow of biochemistry charts pasted to the walls: glycolysis, citric acid cycle, electron transport chain, mitosis, meiosis and DNA replication.

World Cafe Next: Boxed In

Jun 29, 2015

This week's World Cafe: Next artist is British keyboardist, producer and vocalist Oli Bayston, who records smart, indie-rock-influenced house music with Boxed In. Hear a few songs on this episode, and head over to the World Cafe Tumblr for more.

The world needs to count its girls!

That's the message that President Obama sent earlier this month when he signed the Girls Count Act into law. Congress had previously approved the act by unanimous vote.

There are 220 million children around the world who are uncounted. They were not registered at birth, and they don't have birth certificates.

In the longest leg of its planned around-the-world flight, the Solar Impulse took off from Nagoya, Japan, and is now headed to Hawaii. The plane is powered solely by the sun's energy that's stored in batteries; the current trip is expected to last 120 hours — five days and five nights.

James McMurtry On World Cafe

Jun 29, 2015

James McMurtry writes wonderfully detailed narrative songs, making his characters come alive with humor and poignancy. He remains an exquisite guitarist, whether he's playing electric or 12-string acoustic, as he is in this World Cafe session. Earlier this year, McMurtry released Complicated Game, his first new studio album in six years.

Ah, the bread basket. You sit down for a nice meal out, and there it appears: piping hot, giving off a waft of yeasty divinity.

Who can resist?

There's a reason this age-old tradition prevails. Even in the era of paleo and gluten-free, there are still hordes of us who will gladly nosh on crusty, chewy, soul-warming bread.

But the downside may be more than just some extra calories. Turns out, eating all those carbs before a meal can amp up our appetites and spike our blood sugar.

Conversations about mobility, live from Aspen

Jun 29, 2015
Marketplace staff

Monday's Marketplace was broadcast live from the Belly Up in Aspen, Colorado, and the Aspen Ideas Festival. We took a break from the usual Marketplace format for a series of conversations all around one theme: mobility and the economy.

Economic mobility (or lack thereof) in Greece (starts at 01:10)

First things first: we had to talk about Greece. The European Central Bank froze funding to Greek banks. As the latest deadline for the country looms over its creditors and citizens, tensions are understandably high.

Sri Lanka, a palm-fringed island in the Indian Ocean, is in the sixth year of peace. But as the country prepares for elections in August, the legacy of its long civil war still casts a shadow.

The intervening years have been especially painful for the families of the thousands who disappeared in three decades of conflict and remain unaccounted for.

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SCOTUS rules against EPA regulations

Jun 29, 2015
Alberta Cross, Adrienne Hill and Scott Tong

The Supreme Court handed President Barack Obama two victories last week: the Affordable Care Act will keep its subsidies and same-sex marriage became legal in all 50 states. But in a 5-4 decision on Monday, the Supreme Court decided against the Environmental Prote

Your first impulse on hearing "Fight Song," the latest single from Minneapolis trio Bad Bad Hats, might be to lean in. Lead singer Kerry Alexander's bright, lively lines swim over catchy acoustic guitar and velvety keyboard. Impeccable production by Brett Bullion (Bon Iver, Poliça) is programmed to fire all neural pathways associated with carefree indie rock fun. But beware: These lyrics will bite.

Marketplace for Monday, June 29, 2015

Jun 29, 2015

Airing on Monday, June 29, 2015: Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal is bringing the news to you from the Aspen Ideas Festival. First: Kai talks to David Leonhardt of the New York Times about the breaking news of the day and what it has to do with mobility. Plus: mountaineer Chris Davenport and Ted Sarandos, Netflix chief content officer, talk to Kai about the mobility of content and competition.

Europeans take refuge in gold

Jun 29, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Let's circle back to the lack of mobility Greeks and their money are dealing with right now.

Bloomberg News is reporting that Europeans have been buying gold — traditionally the safest of safe havens — at quite a clip this month.

The U.K. Royal Mint says sales of gold coins to Greeks was "double the five-month average in June." 

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