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Some Twitter users pulled up their feed Tuesday and saw changes involving the reply, retweet and "fav" buttons.

Guest DJ: Leon Bridges

Jul 28, 2015

Science journalist Anil Ananthaswamy thinks a lot about "self" — not necessarily himself, but the role the brain plays in our notions of self and existence.

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Jen Welter, an athlete and sports psychologist, will become an NFL coach in what is believed to be a first. The Arizona Cardinals have hired Welter to coach the team's inside linebackers during this summer's training camp and preseason.

"I am honored to be a part of this amazing team," Welter said in a tweet Monday night. She thanked the Cardinals and head coach Bruce Arians.

Scott Pelley earnestly delivers the news.

Jimmy Fallon slow jams the news.

Jamestown, Virginia — the first successful English colony in North America — was a difficult place, to say the least. Most of the colonists who arrived in 1607 died shortly thereafter.

Now archaeologists have discovered the remains of some of the colony's first leaders — Jamestown's elite.

"Well, if I ever ran for office, I'd do better as a Democrat than as a Republican," Donald Trump told Playboy in 1990. "And that's not because I'd be more liberal, because I'm conservative. But the working guy would elect me. He likes me."

Joyce Mitchell, the Clinton Correctional Facility worker who was charged last month with aiding two convicted killers' escape, has pleaded guilty after reaching a deal with prosecutors.

Mitchell, 51, was an instructor in the tailor shop at the prison in northern New York — a position that officials say allowed her to pass tools such as hacksaw blades and a screwdriver to prisoner Richard Matt.

Even the clearest recollections from childhood tend to be coauthored by time and imagination. Looking back on early memories, fun or frightening, we know the mind can play tricks on itself. Did everything happen exactly as our adult brains remember?

How did Volkswagen conquer the world?

Jul 28, 2015
Gigi Douban

Volkswagen's very public goal has been to be the biggest car maker in the world. And it reached that goal in the first six months of this year, selling 5.04 million vehicles and moving past Toyota.

If you think of Volkswagen’s car brands as if they were part of a stock portfolio, it would be pretty diverse. And that’s a good thing, says Thilo Koslowski, vice president and automotive practice leader at Gartner. 

"As a large company that owns multiple brands, it is important that you have to have a balanced approach,” he says, “a premium brand and volume brands.”

Microsoft hoping for a revival with Windows 10

Jul 28, 2015
Kim Adams

Microsoft is rolling out its new operating system, Windows 10, tomorrow. Analysts say the company is hoping for a smooth deployment that might mend fences with customers and businesses still bitter about the last big update in 2012.

The Fed and your feelings

Jul 28, 2015
Sabri Ben-Achour

Consumer confidence is one measure of how we feel about the economy – and our confidence was way down in July. 

You might think the Federal Reserve, which is meeting this week on interest rates, would be concerned with how we feel. But while feelings are important, on their own, an economy they do not make.  

“Consumer confidence is a low-ranking indicator to policymakers at the Federal Reserve,” says Richard DeKaser, corporate economist for Wells Fargo & Company.  “The Fed’s primary focus remains on two indicators: the labor market and inflation.”

Twitter's earnings report in one tweet

Jul 28, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Twitter reported profits on Tuesday afternoon. Turns out it's doing pretty well; revenue is up 61 percent. No news on a full-time CEO. Boom.

140 Characters.

Not counting this bit, after "boom."

Rio de Janeiro adapts as it prepares for the 2016 Olympics

Jul 28, 2015
Kai Ryssdal, Mukta Mohan and Bridget Bodnar

The Summer Olympics will be coming to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 2016, but is the city prepared for it? Since the country won the bidding process, it has undergone all sorts of economic changes. Juliana Barbassa, author of "Dancing with the Devil in the City of God: Rio de Janeiro on the Brink," has been covering Rio de Janeiro's evolution as it prepares for an influx of visitors and worldwide attention. 

Marketplace for Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Jul 28, 2015

Airing on Tuesday, July 28, 2015:  A key measure of consumer confidence is out today. The Fed is meeting Tuesday It doesn’t care how we feel about the economy. Fed decisions are all about the data. Why don’t our feelings matter? And should they? Marketplace explores. Plus, Volkswagen reached its goal: for the first half of 2015, it was the biggest car-maker in the world. What’s the value of being no.1 and how did Volkswagen get there? Marketplace explores. 

Jia Jia, a giant panda living at an amusement park in Hong Kong, celebrated her 37th birthday on Tuesday and, along with it, broke two Guinness World Records.

Jia Jia became the oldest giant panda ever living in captivity and the oldest giant panda currently living in captivity.

CNN reports that a Guinness representative was on hand at Ocean Park to congratulate Jia Jia. Blythe Ryan Fitzwilliam said Jia Jia had achieved "an amazing longevity achievement."

Lions, and Tigers, and Bears! Well, just Lions

Jul 28, 2015
Tobin Low and Janet Nguyen

Yelp is good for a couple of things — finding restaurants in your neighborhood, locating the nearest free Wi-Fi. Now, it would seem public shaming could be added to that list.

Today we have a lengthy conversation with The Tallest Man on Earth, the stage name for Swedish artist Kristian Matsson, as our Sense of Place visit to Stockholm continues. Matsson started making folk-inspired music on his own in 2006, recording by himself and giving charismatic one-man performances. He added instruments and other players for the first time on his new album, Dark Bird Is Home, expanding the sonic possibilities.

Here's a bit of good news for Medicare, the popular government program that's turning 50 this week. Older Americans on Medicare are spending less time in the hospital; they're living longer; and the cost of a typical hospital stay has actually come down over the past 15 years, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Twitter has started taking down jokes for copyright infringement. The removals were first spotted by @PlagiarismBad, which traced the takedown notices to Olga Lexell, a freelance writer in Los Angeles.

President Obama capped a five-day trip to Kenya and Ethiopia by becoming the first sitting American president to address the African Union.

In a speech intended for the entire continent and delivered from the AU headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Obama called on African leaders to create jobs and foster democracy. NPR's Gregory Warner reports that Obama spoke of Africa's bright future and called on leaders to end corruption and political intimidation.

Gregory filed this report:

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During a meeting with all 27 members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization on Tuesday, Turkey said it wanted to give the members a heads up that at some point it may need their help fighting against the self-declared Islamic State.

Turkey called a rare Article 4 meeting of the NATO allies after it began an air campaign against ISIS targets in Syria.

Cancer patients who do rehabilitation before they begin treatment may recover more quickly from surgery, chemotherapy or radiation, some cancer specialists say. But insurance coverage for cancer prehabilitation, as it's called, can be spotty, especially if the aim is to prevent problems rather than treat existing ones.

A mega-economic story is playing out globally. It involves U.S. interest rates, the Chinese stock market and jobs in Minnesota, Arizona and North Dakota.

And your wallet, too.

No kidding. It's all related. To see how, let your mind wander back.

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A court in Tripoli has sentenced the son of Moammar Gadhafi to death in connection with killings during the 2011 uprising that ended Gadhafi's rule.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo that because the country is in such disarray, the sentence was handed down in absentia. She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"A spokesman for Tripoli's self-declared government said Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi is one of nine former regime figures who were sentenced to death today. The rest, including Libya's former spy chief, are all in a prison in Tripoli.

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(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROADHOUSE BLUES")

THE DOORS: (Singing) Let it roll, baby.

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