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Everyone knew Iowa would matter — and New Hampshire, too. The other February contests got a lot of attention, as did Super Tuesday and the mega-states like New York. And, yes, late in the season, you heard people saying, it might all come down to California.

But when did anyone know to get excited about Indiana?

It comes late in the season, with the great majority of states voting sooner and allocating the great majority of delegates, so no one seemed to give a hoot about the Hoosier State — the one and only primary on May 3.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After big wins in four states Tuesday, Hillary Clinton is on the verge of becoming the Democratic nominee for president. Clinton would become the first woman ever to top a major party's presidential ticket.

That milestone has been somewhat lost in the drama of this campaign, but is still "a really important moment in American society," said political science professor Andra Gillespie of Emory University.

"The impact is just as important for a woman to head the top of a major-party ticket as it was for an African-American to do so eight years ago," she said.

French and Belgian officials say they have extradited Salah Abdeslam to France. Abdeslam, a key suspect in last November's Paris attacks, was captured in March in Brussels after a months-long manhunt.

Abdeslam, 26, arrived in France at 9:05 a.m. local time, according to a statement from the French prosecutor's office. He's expected to appear before a French judge today.

It is a truth universally acknowledged that narratives about witchcraft — whether real or imaginary — are usually narratives about women surviving under circumstances that entirely justify the practice. That is, whether embracing the lush thrum of nature or signing one's name in the devil's book, it is never idle, never not-warranted.

The looming worry of another interest rate hike

Apr 27, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about concerns over another interest rate hike; Facebook's efforts to expand to developing countries; and Georgia's plans to open its first oyster hatchery. 

The latest results of the test known as the Nation's Report Card are in. They cover high school seniors, who took the test in math and reading last year. The numbers are unlikely to give fodder either to educational cheerleaders or alarmists: The average score in both subjects was just one point lower in 2015 compared with the last time the test was given, in 2013. This tiny downtick was statistically significant in mathematics, but not for the reading test.

But even though the changes are small, chances are you're going to be hearing about them in a lot of places.

Hillary Clinton hasn't won the nomination, yet. And Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders hasn't technically lost. But in a statement released after the results were in, Sanders' rhetoric took a notable turn.

"[W]e are in this race until the last vote is cast," he said, with no mention of winning the nomination.

Instead, "[T]his campaign is going to the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia with as many delegates as possible to fight for a progressive party platform."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

One evening in November 2014, Aissatou Sanogo's husband came to tell her some startling news.

"Aissatou," he said, "I'm leaving for Europe" — that very night. He earned a modest salary as a bakery deliveryman in Senegal but had dreams of making far more for his family in a European country.

The U.S. Supreme Court hears oral arguments Wednesday in a case that tests the corruption conviction of former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell.

At issue is a great deal more than one case.

The federal government contends that if the Supreme Court voids the conviction, it could cripple enforcement of laws against public corruption. The defense counters that if the conviction is upheld, it would turn ordinary political acts into crimes.

You probably know it's against the law in most states to text and drive — but studies suggest that many of us still peek at our smartphones when we're behind the wheel.

This habit, however, contributes to distracted driving. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, 3,179 people were killed in car crashes involving a distracted driver in 2014.

An hour south from the bright lights of the Las Vegas strip, a tiny town in Nevada is up for sale.

Cal-Nev-Ari, Nev. (pronounced Cal-Nev-Air) is off a lonely stretch of Highway 95, surrounded by distant mountains and endless desert. The town isn't far from the California and Arizona borders, which is how it got its name.

If you can afford the $8 million asking price, you'll get the airstrip, the diner and the town's only casino. That includes a dozen old slot machines and a smokey bar. This place has character.

Copyright 2016 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 KUNM-FM. To see more, visit KUNM-FM.

An annuity can be a very smart retirement investment for many people. That's not just because an annuity can provide a secure revenue stream — a monthly check — for the rest of your life, no matter how long you live. On top of that, the longer you live, the more you get what's called a "mortality credit" as you outlive other people who bought into the annuity. The income gain from that can be many times greater than any other secure investment you're likely to find.

Accidents happen, and if they are someone else's fault, you can go to court to try to get compensation for your medical expenses, lost wages and pain and suffering. If you win, though, the pot of gold you receive may be considerably smaller than you expect. Your health plan may claim some — or all — of the award as reimbursement for money it spent on your medical care.

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D Gorenstein

February is Black history Month. March: National Nutrition Month and April? April is Distracted Driving Month, so named to draw attention to something that is nothing short of a public health crisis.

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Nova Safo

Facebook is looking to grow its 1.6 billion monthly active user base by focusing on the infrastructure that carries the Internet.

The social networking giant is looking for growth in developing countries such as those on the African continent, but it has been hampered by networks that can be slow and expensive.

Politics, regulation and inferior infrastructure all play a role, said Mark Mahaney, an analyst with RBC Capital Markets.

"Anything they can do to remove friction between consumers around the world and the Internet benefits them," Mahaney said.

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D Gorenstein

The nation’s most storied medical journal is facing criticism for failing to share enough data and for the way it handles errors. Those raising questions say the New England Journal of Medicine’s editorial policies make it less dependable than in the past.   

This is a fight over how to deliver the most reliable medical information.

Coming soon to your plate: Georgia oysters

Apr 27, 2016
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Molly Samuel

Oysters already grow wild on Georgia’s coast, but they’re not those big, individual ones that restaurants usually serve. They grow in clusters, with lots of them stuck together. Great for throwing over a fire at an oyster roast, but not what people expect at a nice restaurant.

“The locals love them, they know how to deal with them,” Joe Maley said, who harvests oysters on the coast south of Savannah. “But get too far up the road and people go, ‘What’s that?’”

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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about Comcast's possible purchase of DreamWorks; criticism toward a celebrated medical journal's editorial policies; and SunEdison's bankruptcy filing. 

Marketplace Tech for Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Apr 27, 2016
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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about Apple's quarterly sales drop;  a powerful coalition that's lobbying for autonomous vehicles; and a drone program that delivers health care supplies.

In his victory speech Tuesday night, having swept all five primary states that voted, Donald Trump made a comment about Hillary Clinton that went viral on social media.

"Well, I think the only card she has is a woman's card," he said. "She's got nothing else going on. And frankly if Hillary Clinton were a man, I don't think she'd get 5 percent of the vote. The only thing she's got going is the women's vote. And the beautiful thing is women don't like her, OK?"

Hillary Clinton now has 2,141 delegates (with pledged and superdelegates combined), as of midnight Wednesday.

That means she is 90 percent of the way to the 2,383 delegates she needs to clinch the Democratic nomination.

Taking superdelegates out of the equation, she leads Bernie Sanders by 351 pledged delegates. (Clinton has 1,622 to Sanders' 1,282.) Sanders would need two-thirds of all remaining pledged delegates to overtake Clinton in that count.

The Indian government will require all new mobile phones to have a "panic button" beginning in 2017, "to help our women in distress," the communications and information technology minister tweeted on Tuesday.

The Telecommunications Ministry said the emergency call would be made by holding down a designated key on the phone, according to Bloomberg.

This post was updated at 7:45 p.m. ET.

A central neighborhood in Boston had been left out of Amazon's plans for free same-day delivery in the city. The company said on Tuesday that will change.

A Bloomberg analysis last week showed that the predominantly black Roxbury community did not have access to the Amazon Prime service, which is offered to all adjacent neighborhoods. After looking at nationwide data, Bloomberg called the disparity in Boston "the most striking."

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton took definitive steps toward solidifying their respective party's presidential nomination on Tuesday, making their rivals' task to beat them nearly insurmountable.

Trump won all five of the delegate-rich GOP primaries in Connecticut, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Rhode Island. Clinton notched four victories in Maryland, Delaware, Connecticut and Pennsylvania, while Bernie Sanders won the Rhode Island Democratic primary.

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