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BOOTS is the most interesting new artist I've heard in 2015. I first discovered his sound by hearing his production on the FKA twigs album, a record filled with an ever-fascinating, warped and twisted sound. You may have first encountered him writing and producing songs on Beyoncé's self-titled 2013 album. Earlier this year we premiered BOOTS' self-directed engaging short film/music video Motorcycle Jesus, complete with five brand new songs: his own songs.

On TV, Katrina Has Gone Mostly Unseen

Aug 26, 2015

TV journalism was crucial to the country seeing what was and wasn’t being done to help the survivors of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Since then, however, there has not been a focus – in either fictionalized television or in journalism – on the underlying issues that were uncovered.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss why issues like poverty and class are generally unattractive to many TV audiences.

Mount Everest Reopened To Climbers

Aug 26, 2015

Japanese mountaineer Nobukazu Kuriki is heading up Everest. This week he became the first person granted a permit to climb the mountain since a 7.8 magnitude earthquake devastated much of Nepal in April.

After four attempts, Kuriki hopes to reach the top. He also says he hopes to send a message that the mountain is safe for climbers.

Seven-time summiter Peter Athans says Nepal needs tourists now more than ever. He speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

Ninety percent of students at Hobgood Elementary in Murfreesboro, Tenn., come from low-income households. Most of the school's teachers don't. And that's a challenge, says principal Tammy Garrett.

"If you only know middle-class families, you may not understand at times why they don't have their homework or why they're tired," Garrett says.

If the detective was the defining pop hero of the 20th century, in the 21st, it's the hacker. From The Matrix to The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo — not to mention Julian Assange and Edward Snowden — hackers have become inescapable.

Twenty years ago this week, Microsoft introduced its Windows 95 operating system on CD-ROM. One of the legacies of the operating system was its dreamy startup music, composed by legendary producer Brian Eno and titled "The Microsoft Sound." It lasts six seconds.

Amelia Boynton Robinson, who went from being beaten on a bridge in Selma, Ala., in 1965 to being pushed across the bridge in a wheelchair alongside the president of the United States, has died at age 104.

Her daughter, Germaine Bowser, confirmed to Troy Public Radio's Kyle Gassiott that Boynton Robinson died early Wednesday morning. She had been hospitalized after suffering several strokes this summer.

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

'Merkel' Has Become A Verb In German Youth Vernacular

Aug 26, 2015

On the international stage, she's seen as decisive and principled, especially when it concerns austerity measures in Europe. Domestically, however, Germany's chancellor is known for a wait-and-see approach to politics. Her political position on major debates, like gay marriage, is deemed as deliberately vague.

Merkel's propensity to hesitate before reacting publicly is seen by some as measured and methodical, an approach that speaks to her scientific training. Others consider her a pragmatist who adjusts her principles according to the political mood.

How volatile is the market? Let's consult the VIX

Aug 26, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

The Volatility Index (VIX) measures whether or not there’s too much fear or optimism in the markets. Robert Whaley, father of the VIX, says at the “beginning of the week it was about at a level of 12, at the end of the week it was at 28. That was the biggest percentage increase the VIX has ever had in its entire history.”

Currently, the VIX is around 34 percent. But what exactly does that mean? “It’s a measure of the volatility you expect over the next 30 days,” Whaley says. He adds that the VIX is usually around 20 percent.

People whose diabetes requires insulin injections usually have to make a series of visits to the doctor's office to fine-tune their daily dosage. But many low-income patients can't afford to take those few hours off to see the doctor. As a result, they often live with chronically elevated blood sugars for weeks or months until they can find time to get to the clinic.

No worries on China's streets

Aug 26, 2015
Kai Ryssdal, Rob Schmitz and Hayley Hershman

The Yuan devaluation and China’s market crash has caused global chaos. But Rob Schmitz, Marketplace’s China correspondent in Shanghai, says people on the street in China really aren’t that worried. A Sichuan restaurant owner told Schmitz “that business is really good.”

“Most importantly [China’s] got a growing economy," Schmitz says. "We've seen the headlines this week about China’s market crash ... [but] China’s economy is continuing to grow at around 6 or 7 percent, faster than nearly every other economy in the world.”

Nearly one month after its release, the Windows 10 operating system has been installed on more than 75 million devices, according to Microsoft. That figure reflects worldwide adoptions of the OS that, for now at least, is a free upgrade. Windows 10 is Microsoft's most substantial update since 2012.

Microsoft Vice President Yusuf Mehdi announced Tuesday that the new operating system is running in 192 countries, and on a wide range of devices, including ones made as early as 2007.

No, the economy is not like a roller coaster

Aug 26, 2015
Sam Weiner

When the market goes wild, people say the economy is like a roller coaster. And, frankly, I am sick and tired of this disgusting comparison. Someone has got to stick up for the inventor of roller coasters, my grandfather, Dr. Johann T. Rollercoaster.

And yes, laugh at his name if you must. It was changed at Ellis Island from the original Rollercoasterstein.

How Nevada could cast a shadow over solar

Aug 26, 2015
Scott Tong

A big bet on solar energy may be about to go sour in Nevada. State regulators are considering a utility's proposal to charge owners of rooftop solar systems a monthly fee for being connected to the grid.

That kind of fee, called a demand charge, would take the savings out of solar for most homeowners, undermining the business model of solar companies. Utilities in several states are pressing for similar charges. One big solar installer, Vivint Solar, has already stopped doing business in Nevada because of the uncertainty.

Blame low wages on slack

Aug 26, 2015
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

A new report from the Congressional Budget Office is shedding some light on why wages aren’t going up, even as the unemployment rate goes down. 

Blame it on slack, the CBO says. That is, extra workers in the labor market — people who’ve given up looking for a job. 

These extra workers aren’t officially counted as unemployed because they’re not looking for work. They might be boomers who are pushed toward an unexpectedly early retirement. Or millennials who decide to stay home with the kids.

Marketplace for Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Aug 26, 2015

What we've learned about the market's safety nets; Apple's "Sinodependency"; and stopping the roller coaster metaphor in its tracks.

Getting caught up in Wall Street's safety nets

Aug 26, 2015
Sabri Ben-Achour

For decades now, when stock markets have melted down for one reason or another, markets and regulators have created rules to keep it from happening again.

“We have a number of protections against fat-finger trades,” says James Angel, associate professor of finance at Georgetown’s McDonough school of business. Fat-finger trades are when someone just presses the wrong button. “This happens all the time — someone puts a decimal point in the wrong place or hits buy instead of sell.”

Brokers — or, more specifically, their computers — catch these sorts of things automatically. 

Apple, iPhone and the Chinese economy

Aug 26, 2015
Adrienne Hill

China’s Shanghai Composite Index continues to fall, causing a whole lot of hand wringing about U.S. companies that count on the growing Chinese middle class.

One of the most vulnerable companies appears to be Apple. The Chinese market accounted for about a quarter of the Apple's revenue last quarter; China is responsible for a lot of the company's growth.  

China's luxury buyers are an endangered species

Aug 26, 2015
Mark Garrison

China’s latest economic troubles could be the last thing luxury companies need. Once the great hope for growth for American and European makers of handbags, shoes and jewelry, the Chinese luxury buyer is now a threatened species, with China’s currency losing value and stock market slumping.

More than a month after Sandra Bland died in a Texas jail, a city is naming the street on which Bland was arrested after her. Bland, 28, was found dead in her cell on July 13; her mother and other supporters were present for Tuesday night's Prairie View City Council vote.

From Houston Public Media, Syeda Hasan reports for our Newscast unit:

Consumption of rosé wine is skyrocketing. U.S. imports of rosé from the Mediterranean region have grown in the double digits for the past 10 years running. This is good news for winemakers in the southern, Provence region of France, where many vintners used to make a few bottles of rosé only for themselves. Not anymore.

The Blanc brothers, Didier and Robert, are third-generation vintners near the town of Uzes, in southern France. The area is known for chirping cicadas, olive trees and chilled rosé wine in the summertime.

Tony Wagner

Starting with China's Black Monday, the Dow's brief 1,000-point drop and a couple more roller coaster days, we've been reporting, offering perspective and trying to answer your questions about this crazy week the markets are having.

While we've been doing all that, we've been getting emails from our personal financial advisers, who are doing more or less the same thing.

(This post was last updated at 3:43 p.m. ET.)

Two journalists for Virginia TV news station WDBJ were killed by a gunman Wednesday morning while they were broadcasting live at a waterfront shopping center about an hour southeast of Roanoke, Va.

Reporter Alison Parker and photojournalist Adam Ward were doing a live report from Bridgewater Plaza in Moneta when a gunman opened fire, killing Parker and Ward and injuring Vicki Gardner, the head of a local Chamber of Commerce who was being interviewed. Gardner is now in stable condition, hospital officials say.

PODCAST: Wall Street's rusty plumbing

Aug 26, 2015
David Brancaccio

Stocks are rallying early in the day, but after yesterday's last-minute drop, we try and figure out what we're in for. Then: all the recent volatility is exposing some issues with the way the markets are handling exchange traded funds. Finally: we look at the winners and losers in Corinthian College's bankruptcy plan.

The National Hurricane Center has put Puerto Rico, and some surrounding islands in the Caribbean, under a tropical storm warning as Tropical Storm Erika gains strength in the Atlantic.

The warning means that residents of the island should expect tropical storm winds and heavy rain in the next 36 hours.

Here's the five-day forecast put out by the Hurricane Center:

The Miami Herald explains:

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Australian Wombat Is Looking For Love

Aug 26, 2015
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Firewise is the name of a long-running campaign to get homeowners in wildfire country to take steps to reduce risk. Outside Omak, Wash., John Belles didn't just do the simple things. He built a futuristic, thin-shelled concrete dome house. It's now an unscathed beacon amid acres of hillside blackened by the Okanogan fire, the largest in state history.

Donald Trump has used his wealth, his celebrity and his blunt manner of speaking to blast his way to the top of the polls in the GOP presidential race. It's a phenomenon that's had pundits — and some voters — scratching their heads. Except in California, where larger-than-life celebrity candidates are, like, so 12 years ago.

That's when Arnold Schwarzenegger announced he was running for governor of California. And he did it in his own inimitable way, on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno.

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