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The Two-Way
2:16 pm
Thu October 20, 2011

Obama: Libya's 'Dark Shadow Of Tyranny Has Been Lifted'

A year ago, President Obama just said, "the notion of a free Libya" seemed far-fetched.

But today, with the death of ousted dictator Moammar Gadhafi, the "dark shadow of tyranny has been lifted" in that North African nation, the president added.

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The Salt
1:56 pm
Thu October 20, 2011

A Coconut Cake From Emily Dickinson: Reclusive Poet, Passionate Baker

A daguerreotype of Emily Dickinson, taken in 1846.

William C. North University of Illinois at at Urbana-Champaign

Nelly Lambert is a PhD student in English at Catholic University. She's writing her dissertation on Emily Dickinson's poetry.

Poet Emily Dickinson withdrew from society for most of her adult life. And yet, she was known to lower a basket full of cakes from the window of the home she rarely left to crowds of expectant children on the street below. Dickinson probably never met these children, yet she connected with them through her baking.

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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Thu October 20, 2011

Gadhafi's Death: The View From The Arab World

Libyan children waving National Transitional Council (NTC) flags celebrate in the streets of Tripoli following news of Moammar Gadhafi's death.

Marco Longari AFP/Getty Images

The killing of Col. Moammar Gadhafi will most certainly go down as one of the important chapters of what's come to be known as the Arab Spring, or the popular uprisings across North Africa and the Middle East that have deposed three dictators.

In the region, one big question that will be answered in the coming weeks is how Gadhafi's killing will affect the opposition movements firmly in place in Syria and Yemen.

NPR's Ahmed Al-Omran, a production assistant on NPR's social media desk, has been sifting through social networks to gauge reaction from the region.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:09 pm
Thu October 20, 2011

Advice For The Golden Years: 'Don't Ever Retire Mentally'

iStockphoto.com

Retirement can be an endless golf game or constant trips to the doctor, depending on a whole host of factors, including luck. But either way, it's a stage of life that's usually more difficult and expensive than people expect.

Tell Me More's series on end-of-life issues continues today, with a roundtable discussion at a retirement home in Washington, D.C.

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Planet Money
12:59 pm
Thu October 20, 2011

What If We Paid Off The Debt? The Secret Government Report

This Feb. 1, 2010, file photo shows the National Debt Clock in New York.

Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 9:14 pm

Planet Money has obtained a secret government report outlining what once looked like a potential crisis: The possibility that the U.S. government might pay off its entire debt.

It sounds ridiculous today. But not so long ago, the prospect of a debt-free U.S. was seen as a real possibility with the potential to upset the global financial system.

We recently obtained the report through a Freedom of Information Act Request. You can read the whole thing here. (It's a PDF.)

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Thu October 20, 2011

Foreign Heads Of State, U.S. Politicians React To Gadhafi's Death

As news of the killing of Col. Moammar Gadhafi spread, politicians, world leaders and dignitaries have been issuing statements. We've collected some them on this post and we'll add more as we get them:

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said this in a statement at U.N. headquarters in New York:

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The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Thu October 20, 2011

Unemployment Claims Dip To Lowest Monthly Average In 6 Months

The Labor Department said today that claims of unemployment insurance dipped by 6,000 to 403,000. That brings the monthly average to to its lowest point in six months.

But careful, says The Wall Street Journal, the number still remains above 400,000, "indicating the labor market still is weak."

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Africa
11:43 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Gadhafi's Death A 'Historic Transition' For Libya

Ousted Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was killed Thursday as revolutionary forces overan his hometown of Sirte. U.N. General-Secretary Ban Ki-Moon called it a "historic transition for Libya."

Shots - Health Blog
10:54 am
Thu October 20, 2011

After A Half-Million Cholera Cases, Vaccination Will Begin In Haiti

A Haitian protester in Port-au-Prince last month spray-paints a wall, equating the UN mission in Haiti (abbreviated here as MINISTA) with cholera.

Thony Belizaire AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 11:38 am

A year after cholera burst upon earthquake-weary Haiti, plans are afoot to begin vaccinating people against the highly contagious disease.

Nearly half a million Haitians — about 5 percent of the population — have already been afflicted and more than 6,500 have died.

But the goal of the vaccinators isn't to stop cholera in its tracks. They can't do that in Haiti with just 200,000 doses — enough for only 100,000 people — that's all the manufacturer can offer.

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Africa
10:32 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Moammar Gadhafi Ruled Libya With An Iron Fist

Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, shown in a 2008 file photo, ruled Libya for 42 years. Libya's new leaders say he was killed Thursday in his hometown of Sirte.

Sergei Grits AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 12:19 pm

Moammar Gadhafi ruled Libya with an iron fist for more than four decades. He was an unpredictable, often brutal leader with a grand vision of himself. In the end, he squandered his country's wealth and lost the support of his people.

During his 42 years of rule, Gadhafi reinvented his image many times — from revolutionary to Arab nationalist, freedom fighter and self-styled leader of Africa.

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Africa
10:07 am
Thu October 20, 2011

On The Scene In Tripoli: Reports Of Gadhafi's Demise

Multiple reports say Libya's Moammar Gadhafi may be dead. A photo of a body purported to be Ghadafi has been shown on television and websites after earlier reports that he had been captured and wounded. NPR News producer Grant Clark is in Tripoli and joins Renee Montagne by phone.

The Salt
10:05 am
Thu October 20, 2011

The Historic Allure Of A Late Night Oyster

Late night oysters may be discounted, but they're usually no less fresh than oysters served at any other hour.

Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 10:25 am

Despite its proximity to the Chesapeake Bay, Washington, D.C. isn't a seafood town in its own right, with a proper port. But just steps away from the White House, in the most straight-laced section of a straight-laced town, is a kind of temple to the most sensual of seafood – the raw oyster.

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Africa
10:00 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Developments In Libya: Sirte Defeated; Gadhafi Dead?

Reports streamed in Thursday morning that Libya's Moammar Gadhafi had been captured and killed. A Libyan transitional government official told CNN that Gadhafi is dead. A NATO official cautioned that it will take time to confirm the reports. NPR foreign editor Loren Jenkins talks with Renee Montagne about the latest developments.

Shots - Health Blog
9:47 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Look Around: 1 In 10 Americans Takes Antidepressants

Prozac, the pill that launched the modern antidepressant era, and drugs like it are now taken by 11 percent of Americans.

Stephen Chernin Getty Images

We really are Prozac Nation now.

About 11 percent of people in the U.S. are taking antidepressants according to fresh figures out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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The Two-Way
8:36 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Top Stories: Gadhafi's Fate; Animals In Ohio; World Series

Good morning.

We'll have to make this roundup short and sweet so that we can get back to following the day's hottest breaking news:

-- Reports: Gadhafi Stronghold Has Fallen; His Status Uncertain.

Our other headlines so far today:

-- In Ohio: All Animals Accounted For, Sheriff Says.

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Africa
8:29 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Reports: Libya's Ghadafi And His Hometown Captured

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 11:50 am

Renee Montagne talks with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro about multiple reports of the possible capture of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

The Two-Way
7:34 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Gadhafi Is Dead, Tripoli Rejoices

Anti-Gaddafi fighters celebrate the fall of Sirte in the town October 20, 2011.

Esam Omran Al-Fetori Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:19 am

The end has come for Col. Moammar Gadhafi, who ruled Libya for more than 40 years and over the decades became one of the world's most notorious dictators and sponsors of terrorism.

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The Two-Way
7:16 am
Thu October 20, 2011

In Ohio: All Animals Accounted For, Sheriff Says

After a harrowing night and day spent hunting escaped bears, lions, tigers and other dangerous animals, authorities in Muskingum County, Ohio, believe they have killed, captured or otherwise accounted for 56 animals that were freed Tuesday from a private reserve by a man who it's believed then killed himself.

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Around the Nation
7:14 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Giant Cell Phone Bill Shocks Florida Woman

Celina Aarons' deaf brother communicates via text message. She usually pays about $175 a month for his cellphone. But when he went to Canada without an international plan, the bill was more than $200,000. A Miami TV station intervened, and now T-Mobile says Aarons only owes $2,500. She has six months to pay.

Animals
7:05 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Forget The Tux, Little Blue Penguins Need Sweaters

The Little Blue Penguins off the coast of New Zealand are in trouble, and they need sweaters to save them. The birds are being rescued from a big oil spill. The sweaters keep the penguins from preening. That way they don't ingest the oil.

Around the Nation
6:02 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Occupy Wall Street: From A Blog Post To A Movement

The Occupy Wall Street protests have inspired similar events around America, and in dozens of countries. Here, a truck has been painted with a sign supporting the Occupy Portland protests in Oregon.

Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 11:26 am

After more than 30 days, the Occupy Wall Street movement has evolved from a protest in New York City into a growing international movement. And it all started in July, as a single blog post inspired by the Arab Spring.

Here's a look at significant developments in the Occupy Wall Street timeline, as the movement gathered momentum and spread to other U.S. cities.

Timeline: Tracking Occupy Wall Street's Growth

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Sports
4:06 am
Thu October 20, 2011

World Series Opener: Cards Beat Rangers 3-2

The St. Louis Cardinals won the first game of the World Series Wednesday night. On a chilly, wet evening in St. Louis, the Cards scratched out a 3-2 win over the Texas Rangers. It was a dramatic, hard-fought beginning to what promises to be a close series.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Thu October 20, 2011

European Leaders Try To Keep Debt Crisis From Spreading

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 11:50 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

More demonstrations are being staged today in Greece as its parliament votes on another round of stinging austerity measures. Yesterday's protests ended in vicious street battles between police and protesters. Meanwhile, European leaders seem deadlocked on plans to stop the Greek debt crisis from spilling into the rest of the eurozone. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Athens.

And, Sylvia, how are people reacting to yesterday's turmoil and clashes over these austerity measures?

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Business News

Ari Shapiro has business news.

Business
4:00 am
Thu October 20, 2011

The Last Word In Business

Renee Montagne has the Last Word in business.

Election 2012
4:00 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Romney Campaigns In Iowa

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 11:50 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And I'm Ari Shapiro, updating you now on a story we've been following all morning: Libya's longtime former dictator Moammar Gadhafi is dead. The country's prime minister has confirmed. Stay with MORNING EDITION for more on that story. Now, we turn to domestic news.

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Afghanistan
4:00 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Clinton To Meet Afghan President Karzai

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrived in Afghanistan yesterday on an unannounced visit to encourage the country's leadership to keep up reconciliation efforts with the Taliban. Today she's meeting with Afghan President Hamid Karzai.

Monkey See
12:01 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Amy Poehler: Playing Politics, But Only On Television

Amy Poehler, seen here with Aubrey Plaza as April Ludgate and Chris Pratt as Andy Dwyer, plays idealistic bureaucrat Leslie Knope on NBC's Parks And Recreation.

Ron Tom NBC

Amy Poehler joined Saturday Night Live in 2001 — a time, she says, when no one was really sure comedy was going to ever be okay again. She left in 2008 after playing Hillary Clinton during the show's coverage of an election cycle when, she tells Ari Shapiro on Thursday's Morning Edition, "the country was really paying attention to politics."

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Afghanistan
12:01 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Afghan Civilians Allegedly Forced Onto Mined Roads

Afghanistan's Panjwai district, southwest of Kandahar city, was a Taliban stronghold until the U.S. troop surge in 2010 began to displace the insurgents.

Allauddin Khan AP

Villagers from a violent part of southern Afghanistan say that Afghan troops, along with several American mentors, forced civilians to march ahead of soldiers on roads where the Taliban were believed to have planted bombs and landmines.

No one was hurt. But if the allegations are true, the act would appear to violate the Geneva Conventions governing the treatment of civilians. The episode also raises questions about how civilians are caught between the two sides in the war.

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Election 2012
12:01 am
Thu October 20, 2011

A 'Spirited' Primary Could Be What The GOP Needs

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (left) and Texas Gov. Rick Perry got into a heated exchange about immigration during Tuesday's GOP presidential debate in Las Vegas.

Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 11:50 am

Tuesday night's brawl of a debate in Las Vegas erased any doubt that the fight for the Republican presidential nomination would get bitter. Texas Gov. Rick Perry aggressively parried former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who looked rattled for the first time.

If that hand-to-hand combat continues, the Republican primary could just become a long, drawn-out fight. Whether that's a good thing or a bad thing for the eventual nominee is unclear.

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